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Ketones And Kidney Failure

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Kidney Complications

Chronically elevated blood sugars damage the kidneys. The final stage of untreated or uncontrolled diabetic nephropathy is kidney failure, requiring dialysis or transplant. Kidneys filter out waste products from the blood stream and control water and salt levels in the blood stream. The kidney also influences the blood pressure and helps keep glucose levels, red blood cell production and mineral balance on target. Kidney Disease Chronically elevated blood sugars damage blood vessels and filtering units in the kidneys. This condition is known as diabetic nephropathy. Here are four facts you should know about this preventable condition. Early damage can go unnoticed for as long as a decade. The first sign of a problem is increased protein or microalbumin in the urine. Damage is less likely to occur in individuals whose blood sugars and blood pressures are controlled. Early detection and treatment may successfully stabilize and maintain kidney function. Control blood glucose. Control blood pressure. Control blood cholesterol Don’t smoke Avoid pain medications that can hurt your kidneys (such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) Test urine for kidney function and urine microalbu Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. FitChutney

    Hi
    I'm new to the paleo diet and would like to get an opinion on the dangers of a high protein intake and kidney damage. I understand ketosis may cause the body to form dangerous compounds known as ketones, which can cause organs, specifically kidneys, to fail. Ketosis is believed to be avoided by consuming a minimum of 100 grams of carbohydrates per day. Dosen't the paleo diet limit carb intake?
    Should I be worried? to less than 50 grams per day.
    Thanks!

  2. DFH

    The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D. » Metabolism and ketosis

    The other response to the Atkins diet has been to say it was unhealthy.
    Yeah, there're two factors. The Atkins diet, because it's very low in carbohydrates, it can be ketogenic. That's why your body, in effect, stops running on glucose, on blood sugar, and starts running on fat, and the fat's broken down into these ketone bodies. Ketosis is a mild version of diabetic ketoacidosis, which is the state that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes, and it's fatal.
    This whole medical society grew up basically thinking ketosis is bad, ketoacidosis is bad, and therefore ketosis in these diets is bad and you should do anything you can to avoid these ketogenic diets. In fact, many of the compromise diets from the 1930s through the 1990s were diets that cut back carbohydrates to just the level above which you won't have ketosis.
    So on one level, ketosis is bad. That was always the message, and the other level was, these diets are high in fat, and if they're high in fat, they're going to cause heart disease. One study was done by this fellow John La Rosa, who went on to be a big administrator in the American Heart Association. He did a study in 1981 where he said he put these people on a Atkins diet and their cholesterol levels skyrocketed. Their weight plummeted, and if you actually look at the study, it's almost impossible [that] what he says happened. It's really fascinating that you take somebody from the American Heart Association, you have him do a study on the Atkins diet in 1981, and the cholesterol levels skyrocket, even though the people lose like 20-30 pounds. What he said happened should not happen, even if the diet was atherogenic, as they say.
    Read more: Interview - Gary Taubes | Diet Wars | FRONTLINE | PBS

  3. Lewis

    Originally posted by FitChutney
    Hi
    I'm new to the paleo diet and would like to get an opinion on the dangers of a high protein intake and kidney damage. I understand ketosis may cause the body to form dangerous compounds known as ketones, which can cause organs, specifically kidneys, to fail. So what are you asking?
    Are you asking: "Is a high-protein diet potentially harmful to the kidneys?"
    Or are you asking: "Are ketones (at any level) harmful to the kidneys?"
    The sentence seems to go from the one to the other.
    On protein: The Primal Blueprint, like most low-carb diets, is not actually a high-protein diet. Rather, it's high fat, moderate protein, low-carb.
    On ketosis: Ketoacidosis (which is a state of uncontrolled production of ketones that can occur in, for example, alcoholism) is dangerous. However, if having a moderate quantity of ketones in your blood were dangerous then (before modern times) everyone who lived in Northern latitudes—at least during the winter, when carbohydrate-rich foods were very scarce—would have suffered kidney damage ... which is not the case. Ketosis is a normal human metabolic state.
    But those are just thoughts from me. Here is an answer to the question from a qualified medical doctor who uses ketogenic diets therapeutically with patients (scroll down to question number 5):
    Dr. Jay's Blog: Jay Wortman, M.D. on the science & clinical experience related to low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets & traditional First Nations style diets

    Ketosis is believed to be avoided by consuming a minimum of 100 grams of carbohydrates per day. Dosen't the paleo diet limit carb intake?
    Actually, no, most current versions of the so-called Paleo Diet don't—although their proponents often describe them as low-carb, since if you throw out all cereals, as most if not all do, then you have a pretty low-carb regimen unless you really go crazy on starchy vegetables or fruit.
    Mark's version of a hunter-gatherer-inspired diet, which he calls the Primal Blueprint, suggests that one eat carbohydrates at a level appropriate to one's current metabolic state. See his Primal Blueprint 101, specially his "Carbohydrate Curve":
    Primal Blueprint 101 | Mark's Daily Apple

    Should I be worried? to less than 50 grams per day.
    As I say, the precise level that's best for you depends on your current metabolic state. Mark himself suggests 50 to 100 grammes a day for weight-loss. Most people seem to be OK on that—and, indeed, on less than that—but, of course, check with your GP.

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Kidney Disease

The Facts The kidneys, each about the size of a fist, play three major roles: removing waste products from the body, keeping toxins from building up in the bloodstream producing hormones that control other body functions, such as regulating blood pressure and producing red blood cells regulating the levels of minerals or electrolytes (e.g., sodium, calcium, and potassium) and fluid in the body After the blood has circulated through the body, it passes into the kidneys. The kidneys filter waste products and excess salt and water out of the blood, and pass these out of the body as urine. The kidneys also make hormones that control blood pressure, as well as maintain bone metabolism and the production of red blood cells. It's a serious problem when the kidneys stop working. Waste products that build up in the body cause imbalances in chemicals needed to keep the body functioning smoothly. There are many different types of kidney diseases. Kidney diseases can lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a condition in which the kidneys fail to work normally. People with kidney failure need to receive dialysis or a kidney transplant. Causes The most common causes of kidney disease include di Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. FitChutney

    Hi
    I'm new to the paleo diet and would like to get an opinion on the dangers of a high protein intake and kidney damage. I understand ketosis may cause the body to form dangerous compounds known as ketones, which can cause organs, specifically kidneys, to fail. Ketosis is believed to be avoided by consuming a minimum of 100 grams of carbohydrates per day. Dosen't the paleo diet limit carb intake?
    Should I be worried? to less than 50 grams per day.
    Thanks!

  2. DFH

    The Blog of Michael R. Eades, M.D. » Metabolism and ketosis

    The other response to the Atkins diet has been to say it was unhealthy.
    Yeah, there're two factors. The Atkins diet, because it's very low in carbohydrates, it can be ketogenic. That's why your body, in effect, stops running on glucose, on blood sugar, and starts running on fat, and the fat's broken down into these ketone bodies. Ketosis is a mild version of diabetic ketoacidosis, which is the state that occurs in uncontrolled diabetes, and it's fatal.
    This whole medical society grew up basically thinking ketosis is bad, ketoacidosis is bad, and therefore ketosis in these diets is bad and you should do anything you can to avoid these ketogenic diets. In fact, many of the compromise diets from the 1930s through the 1990s were diets that cut back carbohydrates to just the level above which you won't have ketosis.
    So on one level, ketosis is bad. That was always the message, and the other level was, these diets are high in fat, and if they're high in fat, they're going to cause heart disease. One study was done by this fellow John La Rosa, who went on to be a big administrator in the American Heart Association. He did a study in 1981 where he said he put these people on a Atkins diet and their cholesterol levels skyrocketed. Their weight plummeted, and if you actually look at the study, it's almost impossible [that] what he says happened. It's really fascinating that you take somebody from the American Heart Association, you have him do a study on the Atkins diet in 1981, and the cholesterol levels skyrocket, even though the people lose like 20-30 pounds. What he said happened should not happen, even if the diet was atherogenic, as they say.
    Read more: Interview - Gary Taubes | Diet Wars | FRONTLINE | PBS

  3. Lewis

    Originally posted by FitChutney
    Hi
    I'm new to the paleo diet and would like to get an opinion on the dangers of a high protein intake and kidney damage. I understand ketosis may cause the body to form dangerous compounds known as ketones, which can cause organs, specifically kidneys, to fail. So what are you asking?
    Are you asking: "Is a high-protein diet potentially harmful to the kidneys?"
    Or are you asking: "Are ketones (at any level) harmful to the kidneys?"
    The sentence seems to go from the one to the other.
    On protein: The Primal Blueprint, like most low-carb diets, is not actually a high-protein diet. Rather, it's high fat, moderate protein, low-carb.
    On ketosis: Ketoacidosis (which is a state of uncontrolled production of ketones that can occur in, for example, alcoholism) is dangerous. However, if having a moderate quantity of ketones in your blood were dangerous then (before modern times) everyone who lived in Northern latitudes—at least during the winter, when carbohydrate-rich foods were very scarce—would have suffered kidney damage ... which is not the case. Ketosis is a normal human metabolic state.
    But those are just thoughts from me. Here is an answer to the question from a qualified medical doctor who uses ketogenic diets therapeutically with patients (scroll down to question number 5):
    Dr. Jay's Blog: Jay Wortman, M.D. on the science & clinical experience related to low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets & traditional First Nations style diets

    Ketosis is believed to be avoided by consuming a minimum of 100 grams of carbohydrates per day. Dosen't the paleo diet limit carb intake?
    Actually, no, most current versions of the so-called Paleo Diet don't—although their proponents often describe them as low-carb, since if you throw out all cereals, as most if not all do, then you have a pretty low-carb regimen unless you really go crazy on starchy vegetables or fruit.
    Mark's version of a hunter-gatherer-inspired diet, which he calls the Primal Blueprint, suggests that one eat carbohydrates at a level appropriate to one's current metabolic state. See his Primal Blueprint 101, specially his "Carbohydrate Curve":
    Primal Blueprint 101 | Mark's Daily Apple

    Should I be worried? to less than 50 grams per day.
    As I say, the precise level that's best for you depends on your current metabolic state. Mark himself suggests 50 to 100 grammes a day for weight-loss. Most people seem to be OK on that—and, indeed, on less than that—but, of course, check with your GP.

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Patient Education: Polycystic Kidney Disease (beyond The Basics)

POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE OVERVIEW Normally, the kidneys filter out excess toxic and waste substances and fluid from the blood. In people with polycystic kidney disease (PKD), the kidneys become enlarged with multiple cysts that interfere with normal kidney function. This can sometimes lead to kidney (renal) failure and the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation. There are two major forms of PKD: autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD). ADPKD is the most common hereditary kidney disease, occurring in approximately 1 in every 400 to 1000 people. Autosomal dominant means that each child of an affected parent has a 50 percent chance of inheriting the disease. In addition, autosomal dominant means that it does not skip generations (ie, if a patient with the disease does not pass it along to one of his or her children, then the disease disappears from that family and grandchildren cannot inherit the disease). However, some patients with ADPKD are not diagnosed during their lifetimes, due to very few symptoms. This means that a family member may have the disease without knowing it. ARPKD is uncommon and is typica Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Prairie-dawg

    So I went to the pharmacy yesterday to pick up a new scale and some Ketostix. The pharmacist (who works right next door to me and I've become friendly with) asked me if I was "starting some kind of crazy diet." I told him I've started a ketogenic diet and I'm just trying it out to see if it's right for me. He asked me a few questions about it, mostly about macro ratios and if it's been working so far. When I told him about the higher fat ratio (as opposed to high protein) he seemed somewhat intrigued, but still a little skeptical. The other pharmacist who was working with him chimed in at that point. He said apparently in some Scandinavian countries, they've found that a higher fat content and fewer simple carbs in a person's diet is ideal and actually recommended. However, they both agreed that ketosis for an extended period of time can be very hard on the kidneys. I did a little investigating on my own and there's very little info regarding the long-term effects of the high fat/moderate protein/low carb keto diet. So my question is, has anybody experienced any kidney issues on this diet? Has anyone received any similar warnings from their physician?
    TL;DR
    Pharmacist warned about kidney issues caused by long term ketosis. Seeking out facts/sources to prove or disprove this claim.

  2. cloudmind

    When I first started keto I ended up going to hospital because I had severe internal pain that wouldn't go away. Turns out I was eating far too much protein so my kidneys were giving me grief. Fixed it by upping the fat macros in my diet and I went back to being pain free. Hooray for butter and coconut oil!
    Given my experience, I can understand where the pharmacists are coming from since I think there might* have been a spate of people doing atkins-like diets with kidney problems in the past (too much protein, not enough fat).
    *rampant speculation on my part

  3. Prairie-dawg

    I don't blame them for that at all. In fact, before I really started doing my homework on keto, I used to internally roll my eyes when people would talk about low carb dieting. I think there's a lot of risidual negativity held over from the early days of Atkins regarding low carb diets. Fortunately, I'm always happy to have a teaching moment when the chance arises!

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