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Ketones And Breastfeeding

I Am Breastfeeding My Baby And I Want To Lose Weight. Is A Low Carbohydrate Diet Safe For A Breastfeeding Mother?

I Am Breastfeeding My Baby And I Want To Lose Weight. Is A Low Carbohydrate Diet Safe For A Breastfeeding Mother?

Many women are anxious to get back in shape after childbirth, but we must remember that pregnancy weight wasn’t gained overnight, and won’t disappear quickly, either. It is wise for mothers to wait until two months postpartum to purposely lose weight, as the mother’s body needs time to recover from childbirth and establish a good milk supply. Many mothers find that by following a sensible diet they are able to lose weight steadily while breastfeeding. Anyone who wants to start a weight loss diet should consult with their physician to rule out any health problems that would contraindicate the diet. If a breastfeeding mother is interested in any type of weight loss diet, there are several factors she should consider. Nutritional balance-- A breastfeeding mother should receive adequate and balanced nutrition, for her breastfed baby’s sake, and the sake of her own health. Otherwise, she risks depleting her body’s nutritional stores. A malnourished mother may have inadequate levels of vitamins A, D, B6 and B12 in her milk, and may risk decreased milk supply. Hunger-- Inadequate caloric intake results in feeling weak, tired, and drained. When a mother feels this way, taking care of a baby is very difficult, and these very real feelings can result in lowered milk supply and inhibited milk ejection (letdown) reflex. The Subcommittee on Nutrition during Lactation advises breastfeeding mothers to take in 1500-1800 calories per day. Rate of weight loss-- Gradual weight loss has not been found to affect either the mother’s milk supply or the baby’s health. However, there are documented concerns when a breastfeeding mother loses weight rapidly, defined as more than a pound (.45 kg) per week. Toxins, such as environmental contaminants PCBs and pesticides, are stored in Continue reading >>

Ketones While Pregnant &/or Breastfeeding – Dr Andi Campitelli

Ketones While Pregnant &/or Breastfeeding – Dr Andi Campitelli

Full Transcript: what what about pregnancy and what about breastfeeding and what would your answer be to that good question we do get that one a lot so the first thing to remember is breast milk already contains ketones and babies when they’re born are naturally in a state of ketosis to begin with so their bodies are really great at breaking down and using those fats in the source of fuel so it’s something that’s happening naturally in that process that said though I would say that if you are pregnant breastfeeding you should still consult your healthcare practitioner just to make sure that it’s right for you right but there’s that’s really good to hear because I can’t think of a better product for a woman who’s pregnant and struggling with energy and you also don’t want to do caffeine yeah so this would act as an energy source when they can’t have yeah yeah so that’d be pretty key so yeah just check with your doctor but all natural Continue reading >>

Is Keto Dangerous While Pregnant, Breastfeeding, Or For Children?

Is Keto Dangerous While Pregnant, Breastfeeding, Or For Children?

A question I’ve come across seemingly increasingly in the past few months, is a variation of, is it safe for kids to eat keto, including women during pregnancy and breastfeeding? This is where a simple disambiguation between a well and poorly formulated diet should end the discussion but let’s dig a little bit deeper into the concerns themselves, studies on children, the validity thereof, what a good diet is and context. One of the applications of a well formulated ketogenic diet has been in treatment of PCOS with much success, though more research is needed. You can search for yourself to find more info on this and the specifics with lots of other blogs and anecdotes covering it out there, but between weight loss and improved hormone regulation from better food choices it’s a way to manage symptoms and issues associated with the disorder. Many women who see improvements have noted they end up with a surprise pregnancy after starting low carb. Though usually planned or at least semi-planned, you can find near endless anecdotes of despite several years of trying, a sudden ketobaby happened after a few weeks or months of low carb. Just search through //www.reddit.com/r/xxketo and /r/ketobabies for personal accounts thereof. If you’ve done prior research into keto, you should already know that improvements in endocrine function are one of the benefits with plenty of evidence to support it. So if you’ve found yourself with a surprise baby thanks to keto the next question is, can you, should you, or is it dangerous to continue while pregnant? Ketosis and Pregnancy: Thanks to Japan and low carb as a treatment for diabetes we do have some research done regarding the application of a low carb diet in pregnant mothers on ketone levels and their role. Aside from this, c Continue reading >>

Babies Thrive Under A Ketogenic Metabolism

Babies Thrive Under A Ketogenic Metabolism

Some people, even some scientists who study ketogenic metabolism, have the idea that ketogenesis is somehow abnormal, or exceptional; an adaptation for emergencies only. We disagree. One reason we think a ketogenic metabolism is normal and desirable, is that human newborns are in ketosis. Despite the moderate sugar content of human breast milk, breastfeeding is particularly ketogenic. This period of development is crucial, and there is extensive brain growth during it. Although the composition of breast milk can be affected by diet [1], it is reasonable to assume that breast milk has always been ketogenic, and this is not an effect of modernisation. When the brain is in its period of highest growth, and when the source of food is likely to be close to what it evolved to be for that period, ketones are used to fuel that growth. If nothing else, this suggests that learning is well supported by a ketogenic metabolism. It is also consistent with the ability of ketogenic diets to treat a variety of seemingly unrelated brain disorders and brain trauma. Newborn infants are in ketosis. This is their normal state. Breastfeeding is particularly ketogenic (compared to formula feeding). Breastfeeding longer (up to a point) is associated with better health outcomes. This suggests the hypothesis that weaning onto a ketogenic diet would be healthier than weaning onto a high-carb diet. (Mark-up ours) Human babies are in ketosis Soon after birth, human babies are in ketosis, and remain so while breastfeeding [2]. They use ketones and fats for energy and for brain growth. When this has been studied, in the first couple of hours after birth, babies aren't immediately in ketosis. There is a short delay [3]. During that brief period before ketogenesis starts, lactate (confusingly not to do Continue reading >>

Keto-os Ketone Drink Conference Call Episode #10 With Dustin Schaffer & Sara Banta

Keto-os Ketone Drink Conference Call Episode #10 With Dustin Schaffer & Sara Banta

These audio recordings are to help you learn about one of the most innovative and life-changing health products to hit the mass market: Keto-OS Ketosis Drink In this episode, Dustin Schaffer of schaffermethod.com talks with Sara about why Keto-OS works for basically everybody, even vegetarians who typically have a hard time with a low carb diet. He discusses how new mothers can safely and successfully use exogenous ketones, even while breastfeeding. Dustin touches on concerns over saturated fat and cholesterol. Also, why ketones are such a powerful fuel source for healthy brain functions and even more important to the brain during times of stress or trauma. Plus a special announcement about the New Keto Cream Product and new and improved Keto-OS Version 2.1! Click the play button below to listen and learn more. What You Will Hear: Dustin Schaffer’s background [0:26] The low-down on Ketosis and Exogenous Ketones [1:45] The History of the Ketogenic Diet for Curing Disease [3:30] Why does this product work for basically everybody? [6:15] The Typical Low-Calorie Diet Cycle vs Fat Loss using Keto-OS [7:20] Ketones preserve muscle tissue during calorie restriction [8:45] When you have exogenous Ketones in your system you are less cranky, less hungry, you have less cravings, your mood is better, so you can get more done during the day [9:15] What happens if you’re a vegetarian? Can you successfully use the product? [10:20] Dustin’s recommendations for a safe protocol for new mothers wanting to use Keto-OS [13:23] Why are Ketones such a powerful fuel source for healthy brain functions and so important during times of stress or trauma? [15:21] Dustin touches on concerns over saturated fat and cholesterol [17:20] NEW Keto Cream Product [20:02] NEW Version of Keto-OS being r Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Prof Noakes is on trial for ‘advising’ a mom to wean her baby onto low carb, high fat foods. Could babies’ innate ketosis – a state more often associated with low-carb, high-fat diets – be an arrow in Prof Noakes’ defence’s quiver? By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD Did you know that human newborns and exclusively breastfed babies are in ketosis? 1 I am a dietitian, with two years of intensive postgraduate training in nutrition, and I didn’t realise this until just over a month ago. The fact that human babies are naturally in ketosis is an inconvenient truth because it implies that ketosis (which also occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet) is not only a natural metabolic state for human infants, but that it’s probably beneficial too. Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. 2 “Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. ” A word on ketones and ketosis Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body uses fat as fuel in preference to carbohydrates – as occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. The body makes ketones from fat, when dietary glucose (from carbohydrates and sugar) is low. Ketones can be used as fuel to produce the energy your body and brain needs to function. The human brain only has two options for fuel: glucose or ketones. The other body orga Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding

Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding

High protein, low carbohydrate diets like the Atkins diet and the South Beach diet are very popular. These diets can be helpful for diabetics and people with gluten intolerance. In these diets, protein and high fat foods are not restricted; vegetables are limited. The main difference between Atkins and South Beach seems to be that the South Beach diet is less structured and emphasizes eating healthier, mostly unsaturated fats. The primary objections I’ve seen to these and similar diets — and this applies to everyone, not just nursing mothers — is simply the fact that they are not balanced and thus have the potential to make you feel unwell. These diets tend to be low in phytochemicals, antioxidants and folic acid. They also tend to be low in fiber and minerals (including calcium, magnesium, phosphorus & potassium), and the Atkins diet may be high in saturated fats. Because of this, long-term adherence to these diets may increase your risk for various health problems. Since some of the weight loss from these diets is simply due to water loss, dehydration is a risk if the dieter is not careful to drink plenty of water. Some moms have found that very low carb diets decrease milk supply. Going off the diet generally brings milk volume right back up again. This decrease in milk supply may be due to several factors: Dehydration. The sudden decrease in calories when mom goes on the diet. If a woman is used to a certain level of calories, an abrupt drop due to dieting (or illness) may reduce her milk supply. This sudden decrease in calories can tell mom’s body that she is in “starvation mode” and to conserve on all fronts (thus less of her body’s resources go into making milk). Insufficient caloric intake. With a low carb diet, many people are not nearly as hungry Continue reading >>

Lactation Ketoacidosis: An Unusual Entity And A Review Of The Literature

Lactation Ketoacidosis: An Unusual Entity And A Review Of The Literature

Go to: CASE PRESENTATION A 31-year-old woman who was 10 months postpartum and was breast-feeding presented to the Emergency Department with nausea, fatigue, vertigo, malaise, and 1 episode of emesis. She had been well until 20 hours earlier when her symptoms began somewhat suddenly and progressed in severity such that she sought treatment in the Emergency Department. She denied having fever, chills, or diarrhea and reported having consumed nothing out of the ordinary; no one else in her household was ill. She had not ingested or used any illicit substances, alcohol, or over-the-counter or prescription medications in the days preceding her presentation. Her medical history included mild asthma, for which she took no medications on a regular basis. She had an ectopic pregnancy 6 years earlier and hyperemesis gravidum 7 years ago when pregnant with her first child. She was breastfeeding her second child, a 10-month-old daughter. She had 2 hospital admissions in the preceding 3 months, with symptoms similar to those at current presentation. In each case, she was given intravenous fluids, her symptoms quickly resolved, and she was discharged from the hospital the following day. No cause was established for her illness in either of her prior hospital admissions. On physical examination, she appeared ill but was not in acute distress. She was alert and fully oriented. Her temperature was 35.8°C, respiratory rate was 16/min, heart rate was 92/min, blood pressure was 157/125 mmHg, and oxygen saturation was 100% breathing room air. Results of her physical examination revealed no abnormalities of her head or neck. She had clear breath sounds, normal heart tones and no murmurs, and a soft nontender abdomen. She had no abnormalities of the extremities or nervous system. Results of Continue reading >>

Have You Had A Ketone Experience?

Have You Had A Ketone Experience?

Which interests you the most? Reducing Brain Fog Stimulating Fat Loss Increasing Energy All of the above Please comment at the end of the article on which one of these is the most important to you! And keep reading to find out how elevated ketones may give you these benefits and more. If you already know the many benefits of taking ketones and don’t have time to read my entire article, then click here to start your ketone experience. For those of you who want to read more, you can read the entire Prüvit review or click on the section that interests you the most. What do you do to stay healthy? Are you eating organic foods and exercising? Do you make sure that you eat whole foods that are non-GMO? Are you interested in releasing heavy metals from your system? All of these questions are on my mind in between chasing around my three little boys. And of course weight loss too! I really want to knock out that last 20 pounds of baby number three! In my quest to get healthy, I have been researching various ways to burn fat. That’s when I came across a powerful macronutrient called ketones. Why is it so special? It helps your body burn fat rather than carbohydrates. This is something that I am definitely interested in! So I started taking Keto OS and then I wrote this ketone supplement review. What are exogenous ketones? Have you ever wondered what are exogenous ketones? Let’s start with the word exogenous which is something that is created from external factors. In this case this means that these ketones are made by scientists and then eaten to accelerate ketosis. Your body produces ketones organically when you experience starvation or you eat a diet that restricts carbohydrates and increase your intake of fats. The ketones are used as a fuel source for your body and fo Continue reading >>

7 Postpartum Stressors You Should Know About

7 Postpartum Stressors You Should Know About

Congratulations! You made it through a 9-month rollercoaster of blood sugar swings, weight changes, mood shifts and some bizarre food cravings. Your beautiful new baby is taking up most of your time and attention... but don’t forget to take care of yourself too. Managing your blood sugar is still important to the safety and development of your baby. In most cases, insulin levels return to near pre-pregnancy levels soon after delivery. Sure, there may be a day or two immediately after giving birth when insulin requirements are unusually low (due to the sudden elimination of placental hormones and your temporary ability to secrete some insulin). But all good things do come to an end. I always recommend that my clients keep a written record of their pre-conception insulin doses so that they can revert to them after delivery. So that’s it, right? Not quite. New times call for new challenges. Nursing Nuances Many moms choose to breastfeed their baby. And for good reasons. Breastfeeding provides more than just ideal nutrition for the baby. There is also evidence that it leads to better immune function and may offer long-term protection against type-1 diabetes. Moms who breastfeed tend to recover faster from the trauma of delivery. Resumption of menstrual cycles is delayed. The risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer later in life is reduced. And few moms will argue that breastfeeding may be the most intimate bonding time they ever get with their baby. What’s more, breastfeeding can promote weight loss -- something desired by many new moms. Breastfeeding women use approximately 200 calories daily from their fat stores to produce breast milk. Weight loss will almost always result in reduced insulin requirements. Basal/long-acting as well as bolus/mealtime doses will ne Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding On A Low-carb Diet – Is It Dangerous?

Breastfeeding On A Low-carb Diet – Is It Dangerous?

Is it dangerous to breastfeed while on a low-carb, high-fat diet? Recently, the journal of the Swedish Medical Association published a case report (summary in English) of a woman who, six weeks after giving birth, had to be hospitalized for severe ketoacidosis. Luckily, she recovered quickly and her numbers were back to normal the next day. Ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition, most often seen in type 1 diabetics with acute insulin deficiency. In rare cases, ketoacidosis may occur in non-diabetics after prolonged periods of starvation or inadequate food intake, in which case it typically occurs in combination with stress or other medical conditions. The woman in this case had been eating low-carb, high fat for a long time before the incident. After giving birth however, she had suffered flu-like symptoms of fever, nausea and a complete loss of appetite. Despite this, she was still able to breastfeed her baby, which of course ramped up her nutritional requirements. The case study report brings up the woman’s low-carbohydrate diet as one possible contributing factor to the situation. However, as soon as the media found out, they immediately exaggerated this possible contributing factor to the guaranteed sole cause of the condition (which, as we shall see, is unikely): Metro: Woman Falls Seriously Ill of LCHF Diet During Lactation (Google translated from Swedish) In the woman’s own words The woman described in the case report in the journal contacted me of her own accord through common acquaintances. She tells a different story from the one perpetuated by the media: What isn’t made clear is that I, the breastfeeding woman, had been eating LCHF for approximately six years before this incident, but, because of stress during my second pregnancy and after childbirth I s Continue reading >>

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

KETO//OS is quite safe during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. It is recommended to choose the caffeine free Keto//OS and drink plenty of water. Ketones naturally exist in the body, and are created as a normal process of fat metabolism. KETO//OS simply provides these ketones from an exogenous source, but they have the same beneficial impact. However, if you suffer from any medical conditions, it is always safe to consult your health care provider prior to starting any new nutritional supplement. Continue reading >>

Safe Dieting While Breastfeeding

Safe Dieting While Breastfeeding

For a new mom, weight loss after delivery of her child can be an important goal for a mom's self-esteem and happiness. But for moms who are breastfeeding, it is important that weight loss occur slowly and in a healthy manner. Below, I provide a few comments on three of the more popular diet plans, specifically regarding how to implement them in a way that is safe for breastfeeding moms and for their new babies. Here are the three that I've selected to touch on for this post: Atkins South Beach Weight Watchers Weight Watchers... This diet is by far the most appropriate and healthy diet for breastfeeding women of the three discussed in this blog post... Breastfeeding moms SHOULD NOT participate in the first phases of this diet due to the fact that low-carb diets can cause mom’s body to release ketones that could pose risks for a baby. [Ketones are chemicals made when the body does not have enough insulin in the bloodstream. Serious illness and even comas can result when ketones build up too quickly in the bloodstream.] Phase 1 NOT RECOMMENDED for Breastfeeding Women The Induction Phase is meant to kick-start the weight loss process by burning fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. Phase 2 NOT RECOMMENDED for Breastfeeding Women Phase 2 of the Atkins Diet is an "Ongoing Weight Loss Phase" designed to keep carbohydrate consumption low (25 grams/day) so that fat continues to be burned. Phase 3 Breastfeeding Women May Begin the Diet at this Phase and eat a Well-rounded Diet Atkins' Pre-maintenance Phase helps the dieter lose the last 10 pounds towards their goal. Phase 4 Breastfeeding Women May Engage in this Phase The Maintenance Phase. Visit the South Beach website This diet has three fundamental phases for moms. If you are breastfeeding, DO NOT engage in Phase 1. Skip Continue reading >>

Ketones And Breastfeeding

Ketones And Breastfeeding

“Is it true that Keto/0S helps to put you in Ketosis?” Fact or Fiction?” Addressing Ketogenic diets and exogenous ketones while breastfeeding. Please ask your questions below. More from my site DO I HAVE TO FOLLOW A STRICT KETOGENIC OR LOW CARD DIET WHILE DRINKING KETO//OS Pruvit What happened after 250 days on Keto OS? Pruvit weight loss ketogenic low carb diet ketopia Pruvit Keto OS Honest Review / Buyer Beware / Don’t Waste Your Time (Must Watch) from Keto Os Review via IFTTT Continue reading >>

Low Carbohydrate Diets And Breastfeeding

Low Carbohydrate Diets And Breastfeeding

Article written by Dr Susan Tawia, Manager, Breastfeeding Information and Research team, for the January 2017 health professional member eNewsletter. Low carbohydrate (carb), high fat diets continue to be popular and women of reproductive age are following them. They will often change their diet to a more ‘conventional’ one during pregnancy, but are often keen to return to a weight-loss diet, that they have had success with, after the pregnancy. So, what do we know about the effect of low carb, high fat diets on breastmilk composition and on the metabolism of the breastfeeding woman? The lack of research on this type of diet, and the possible effect on breastmilk composition, breastfeeding women and their infants, was highlighted by both breastfeeding experts and dietitians in 2004 (Heinig & Doberne, 2004; Wood & Hilldebrandt, 2004) at the height of the popularity of the low carb, weight loss diet advocated by Dr RC Atkins — the Atkins diet. Research on low carb, high fat diets has been undertaken, but surprisingly, only one study has been done. Mohammad, Sunehag, & Haymond (2009) looked at maternal breastmilk production, infant intake and maternal glucose metabolism and broadly looked at the macronutrients in breastmilk. Two moderate hypocaloric diets (1785 ± 22 kcal/day) were assessed in a cross-over design: seven, healthy lactating mothers and their infants were studied on 2 occasions in random order for 8 days separated by 1 to 2 weeks. On one occasion, the subjects received the low carb, high fat (LCHF, 30% of energy as carbohydrate and 55% as fat) and on the other occasion received the high carb, low fat diet (HCLF, 60% of energy as carbohydrate and 25% as fat). It is important to note that the amount of carbohydrates consumed during the LCHF was around 150 Continue reading >>

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