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Experiment: Optimal Ketosis For Weight Loss And Improved Performance

Experiment: Optimal Ketosis For Weight Loss And Improved Performance

Can measuring ketones help you lose weight and improve performance? Let’s try to find out. Today my ketone experiment reached goal #1: achieving stable optimal ketosis*. After getting my blood ketone meter I’ve eaten a stricter LCHF diet than I usually do. More fat, less carbs. No bread, no potatoes, pasta, rice or fruit. Instead I’ve eaten meat, fish, vegetables, egg and extra large amounts of high-fat sauces and butter. In the mornings coffee with plenty of butter/coconut fat in it. I’ve occasionally cheated with some nuts, root vegetables, berries, cream and a little wine. After just a few days I entered light nutritional ketosis (over 0.5 mmol/L on the meter). But it took a full three weeks to achieve stable optimal ketosis (1.5 – 3 mmol/L) in the mornings. It was also interesting that it was much quicker to get high ketone readings during daytime and in the evenings (data not shown in the chart above). I’ve also tested keto sticks for measuring urine ketones (cheaper and simpler). In my case the results so far track the blood ketones reasonably well, even if urine ketones is a more inexact and unreliable test. So what do you think I’ve noticed? Does it feel different? What do you think happened to my weight & waist measurement (I started at a normal satisfactory weight) and training/mental performance? Answers are coming up, but feel free to guess in the comments! Ketosis */ Ketosis is a natural state where the body is almost only burning fat.The secret of ketosis is to eat very low amounts of carbs and only moderate amounts of protein. Then add fat to satiety. Some less informed people still confuse natural ketosis with the pathological state ketoacidosis. The latter has completely different causes, usually extreme insulin deficiency in type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

Tracking ketone levels is a large part of success on the ketogenic diet. It helps you know how far you are into ketosis and where we might need to make changes. But did you know that there’s an even better way to step it up a notch? The glucose ketone index is a simple calculation that allows you to find out how ketosis works best for you individually. Without it, you could be in full, high-level ketosis yet still not getting the full benefits. In this post, we’ll be looking at how to easily track your glucose ketone index for different aspects of health along with your ketogenic diet. Basics of the Glucose Ketone Index Here’s what you need to know about the glucose ketone index (GKI): Researchers have used the index in studies on the ketogenic diet, fasting, and more. Additionally, it has been used for tracking changes and progress regarding weight loss, athletic performance, management of metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and even cancer treatment. Now that we’ve covered the basics of what the GKI does, let’s talk about how you can use tracking it to your advantage. Tracking Your Glucose Ketone Index What’s so special about the glucose ketone index is that it lets you track both glucose and ketones at the same time, taking into account how they work together. It’s a way to know your optimal state for addressing all sorts of health conditions. Tracking this number benefits you over simply measuring ketone levels. That’s because even if you’re deeply in ketosis, you could still have high blood glucose levels that throw things off and affect your health. Essentially, it gives you a more full picture of your metabolic health. The numbers you can expect to target depend on your intentions for being in ketosis. Is your goal weight loss, better overa Continue reading >>

How To Find Your Ketogenic Diet Macronutrient Numbers

How To Find Your Ketogenic Diet Macronutrient Numbers

To get started with your ketogenic diet macros, it’s a good idea to first put the Cronometer app on your phone or computer to track what you eat. It’s a 1-time $3.99 payment I believe, and fully worth it. Any preferred macronutrient tracking method will work, but Cronometer is the only one I’ve used and it’s great. Any other macronutrient tracking app, tool or method will work, but Cronometer is the one I prefer to log and track with. Logging food is a bit laborious, but I found it fun and educational. It becomes automated once you’re in the groove and have put your go-to keto foods/recipes and their macronutrients saved. It makes it easy to work with. If you’re like me, you are a creature of habit, and will soon turn to the same handful of meals on any given day throughout the week. Even if you have a meal plan made up for you, you still need to come up with your personal macronutrient numbers: protein, carbohydrate, fat. Once you have your macro targets, you’ll need to stock up on the essential keto foods and get a ketone tester. There are 3 methods used to test ketones: Blood testers monitor how much beta-hydroxybutyrate you have in your blood. Abbott’s Precision Xtra is a solid option. It also reads blood glucose levels. It doesn’t come with glucose or ketone strips so you’ll have to pick those up separately (these are affiliate links). The Ketonix breath ketone analyzer is a cheaper long-term solution. Breath Ketone analyzers like the Ketonix, test for acetone levels in your breath. Acetone levels are in line with how much BHB you have in your blood, so this is the second best option as far as accuracy. To learn more about how breath testing works, here is an informative presentation from Michel Lundell, the creator of Ketonix. Urine strips are Continue reading >>

Precision Xtra

Precision Xtra

SIMPLE BLOOD GLUCOSE & KETONE TESTING IN THE SAME METER The Precision Xtra system offers intuitive setup and simple icon-driven menus that help simplify blood glucose monitoring. The Precision Xtra system tests both blood glucose and blood ketone all with the same meter using the Precision Xtra blood glucose test strips and Precision Xtra blood ketone test strips. EASY, EVERYDAY TESTING Simple 2-Step Testing Insert strip, add adequate blood sample, and test begins Smart Icon-Driven Menu Intuitive setup and easy navigation Easy-to-Use Buttons Easy to review results—with ability to scroll back and forth PRECISION XTRA BLOOD GLUCOSE TEST STRIPS No coding means one less step Accurate results in 5 seconds Small sample size – only 0.6 µL Individually wrapped for easy testing on-the-go PRECISION XTRA BLOOD KETONE TEST STRIP No coding means one less step Accurate results in 10 seconds Sample size - only 1.5 µL Individually wrapped for easy testing on-the-go QUICK LINKS The Virtual Product Manual Owner’s Guide: English | Español Log Book Precision Xtra Glucose Test Strips - Instructions for use Precision Xtra Ketone Test Strips - Instructions for use Data Management Software Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

Ketostix: What Are Ketostix And How Do I Use Them?

Ketostix: What Are Ketostix And How Do I Use Them?

If you’ve been reading up on keto dieting for a while, you’ve no doubt come across people talking about Ketostix (sometimes improperly spelled as ketosticks or keto sticks). What are ketostix? Why do you need them? We answer all that and more in our complete guide to Ketostix and ketone urinalysis testing. What are Ketostix? Simply put, Ketostix are small, thin plastic strips with a small reagent area on them. When Ketostix are dipped in urine (or passed through a stream of urine), the reagent area changes color to indicate the amount of ketones that are present in your urine. This is an important indicator for those on ketogenic diets because it lets us know that our body has adapted to ketosis and we are doing the diet right. Do I need to buy Ketostix? Yes and no. Ketostix serve two very important functions for ketogenic dieters: Troubleshooting: Beginners find Ketostix useful because it is an indicator that they are doing the ketogenic diet correctly and have indeed limited their carbohydrate consumption sufficiently to force the body into ketosis, thereby starting the process of burning fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. More advanced keto dieters use the strips to help figure out exactly how many carbohydrates they can eat before they are kicked out of ketosis. It can also help determine how different foods affect one’s ability to stay in ketosis. For example, some people’s bodies can handle sugar alcohols without having trouble staying in ketosis, and Ketostix can help diagnose this. Psychological Motivation: Quite simply, it feels great seeing Ketostix turn purple. It’s a little bit of positive reinforcement that those of us on keto diets sometimes require to keep us motivated. It might seem stupid to some, but committing to a ketogenic diet is no Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management.

Type 1 Diabetes In Adults: Diagnosis And Management.

Go to: 12.1. Ketone monitoring [2015] 12.1.1. Introduction Ketosis and ketonuria reflect a greater degree of insulin deficiency than hyperglycaemia alone. The presence of ketones indicates that insulin concentrations are too low not only to control blood glucose concentrations but also to prevent the breakdown of fat (lipolysis). Because ketones are acid substances, high ketone concentrations in the blood may create acidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency and in its established state carries a 0.7–5% mortality in adults.459,476,784 High ketones in the blood are associated with high levels of fatty acids and together create insulin resistance. The patient with significant ketonaemia will require more insulin than usual to control the blood glucose. Traditionally, ketonaemia has been assessed by urine testing. This has been applied in three main settings: it is recommended as part of guidance for patient self-management of acute illness at home, when patients are advised to increase their usual corrective insulin doses in the presence of significant ketonuria; in the assessment of patients presenting to emergency services with hyperglycaemia, where presence of ketonuria may influence management decisions, including need for admission and in the management of established DKA, where resolution of ketonuria is an important indication of recovery. However, not all ketone bodies are detected by urine testing. For example, beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) is not detected with current strip tests and if there is a high β-OHB:acetoacetate ratio, urine testing may give a falsely low estimate of ketosis. Furthermore, after an episode of ketoacidosis, where measurement of blood ketones may provide a more accurate assessment of re-insulinisation than blood glucos Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Sugar And Ketones

Checking Blood Sugar And Ketones

Checking blood sugar and ketone levels regularly on a restricted ketogenic diet for cancer is an important part of reaching and maintaining the target blood sugar and ketone levels recommended for slowing cancer growth. Here's how to do both, step by step: Getting Started: Calibrate the Ketone and Glucose Meters You'll only need to do this step when you start a new box of ketone or glucose strips. There will be a plastic calibration tool included with the new Ketone strips. Plug the calibration strip into the Ketone meter and wait for it to confirm the calibration numbers. Once that is done, the meter is ready to use. The glucose meter will also have a calibration strip, so if you are starting with a new box, do the same thing with the glucose meter. A separate glucose meter is not required, as the Precision Xtra meter can check both glucose and ketones, but I just happened to already have a glucose meter, so I use it. Now that both meters have been calibrated, we are now ready to take a blood glucose and blood ketone reading. For the glucose test especially, your hands must be clean and dry. Using warm water to wash your hands will make the blood flow better. Since you will be washing your hands and don't want to contaminate them afterwards, get the strips ready first. This will also ensure that the meter doesn't shut off before you can get the strip out and insert it. Open one of the individual ketone strips and take the strip out. You can just place it on top of the meter until you are ready to insert it. Do the same thing with a glucose strip. Using the lancet tool which comes with the Ketone meter, prick your finger and squeeze out a small drop of blood. Now insert the glucose strip into the meter and wait for the indication it is ready to test. Then touch the end Continue reading >>

Jimmy Moore’s N=1 Experiments: Nutritional Ketosis Day 1-30

Jimmy Moore’s N=1 Experiments: Nutritional Ketosis Day 1-30

Before I went on the 2012 Low-Carb Cruise last month, I started reading a book that my low-carb research friends Dr. Jeff Volek and Dr. Steve Phinney had written as a follow-up to their fantastic 2011 release The Art And Science of Low Carbohydrate Living (listen to my interview with Dr. Phinney about this book in Episode 479 of “The Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb Show”). The sequel is called The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Performance and was written specifically to share the latest science behind ketogenic diets for athletes who are keenly interested in optimizing their exercise performance with fat and ketones serving as their body’s primary fuel source once they reach what Dr. Phinney refers to as “keto-adaptation.” But the information these low-carb stalwarts provide in this handy dandy little book goes much deeper than that as you will read about in this blog post. Most low-carbers have traditionally been using urine ketone sticks under the brand name Ketostix to measure their level of ketones being produced by color (from pink to dark purple) as a result of their low-carb diet. But as I previously shared in this YouTube video, this can be a frustratingly inaccurate way of measuring whether you are producing enough ketones in your blood to see the kind of results you are hoping for on your low-carb lifestyle change. But thanks to the cutting-edge information provided by Volek and Phinney in The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Performance, we now have a new and better way to measure the actual ketones that are in your blood which determines whether you have become keto-adapted and burning fat and ketones for fuel. They refer to getting into this state as “nutritional ketosis” to obviously distinguish it from ketoacidosis which is only an issue Continue reading >>

Ketone Strips To Measure Fat Burn

Ketone Strips To Measure Fat Burn

[trafficplayer_skin padding: 19px 0 0 22px; margin: 0 auto; width: 432px; height: 365px; background: url(no-repeat top left; text-align: left;][trafficplayer_youtube_video width=”400″ height=”301″ src=”][/trafficplayer_youtube_video][/trafficplayer_skin] You're eating right, working out…doing all the right things, but you aren't seeing the difference in the mirror yet. This is where people tend to break down and move off that momentum back into a world of being fat! But what if there was a way to monitor your fat burn, on a daily basis to help keep you motivated? There is when using Ketone Strips. These strips are usually used by Diabetics to see how large their Ketones are, but Ketones are also a sign of burning fat. With that said, you are able to use Ketone Strips on a daily basis to see if you are, indeed, burning fat! As explained in the video, using Ketone Strips is a very easy process and you, instantly know if you were a good boy or girl that day! You can buy Ketone Strips at Target or Walgreens or any other drug store. I get my Ketone Strips at Target for about 10 bucks and they have played an integral part of my weight loss success (along with the BENew™ Metabolism Booster). The Balance You Need Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

The Principle Of The Urinalysis Test

The Principle Of The Urinalysis Test

URS-K • URS-3 • URS-10SG • URS-UTIProfessional Urinalysis Reagent Test Strips Professional urine reagent test strips for the rapid determination of Ketones (URS-K), Glucose, Protein and pH (URI-3) plus Leukocytes, Nitrites, Ketones, Bilirubin, Blood, Urobilinogen, and Specific Gravity (URI-10) levels in urine. The URS-UTI is a single use test specific for detection of urinary tract infections. These are the diagnostic reagent strips used by physicians, clinics and hospitals to initially screen for suspected and/or existing health conditions. Simple to use, urine diagnostic reagent strips can provide early indications of developing health problems and identify potential abnormal functions requiring more extensive testing. Additionally, routine use is frequently recommended by physicians for monitoring certain existing and chronic health conditions. THE PRINCIPLE OF THE URINALYSIS TEST These urinalysis test strips, URS-K (Ketones) URS-3 (Glucose, Protein, pH) and URS-10 (Glucose, Protein pH, Leukocytes, Nitrites, Ketones, Bilirubin, Blood, Urobilinogen, and Specific Gravity) and URS-UTI (leukocytes and Nitrite) are simple, easy to use reagent strips for the detection of key diagnostic chemical markers in human urine. They are the same urinalysis test strips used routinely by doctors, laboratories and healthcare professionals in preliminary diagnosis of, and initial screening for potential health problems. URS-Strips are plastic strips to which chemically specific reagent pads are affixed. The reagent pads react with the sample urine to provide a standardized visible color reaction within 30 seconds to one minute depending on the specific panel screen. The color is then visually compared to the included color chart to determine the level of each chemical factor. Test Continue reading >>

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind The Scenes Data On The Ketogenic Diet

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind The Scenes Data On The Ketogenic Diet

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind the Scenes Data on the Ketogenic Diet I’ve tried a lot of diets. I first went vegetarian, then slow carb, then gluten-free, then Paleo. I even did a 28-day Chipotle diet, which is exactly as awesome as it sounds. Eventually I found the Ketogenic diet. For me, like for many people in our communities, this all started with a health concern. I was born with a heart condition. It never impacted my life, but it was there, lingering. When I was a junior in college, a few classmates and I were out enjoying late night pizza. Out of nowhere, one classmate suddenly jolted upright and fell off his stool. He died. I found out the next morning it was from a lingering heart condition, not too unlike my own. I started to think about my health a lot more after that. I read about nutrition and started exploring the confusing world of diets. As I learned more and as I became more involved in Quantified Self, I found myself wanting to quantify these diets. That’s what drew me to Keto. It’s the most measurable diet. Quick Summary of the Ketogenic Diet Keto is a high-fat, very-low-carb diet, usually with 70% of calories coming from fat. The idea is to switch your body from using glucose as its primary energy to breaking down fats into ketones for energy. You can measure the macros that you eat and you can measure the ketones in your urine, breath, and blood. In 2013, I did my first experiment with the ketogenic diet. In that experiment, I tracked everything I ate in MyFitnessPal and compared it to other data I was collecting. I found my energy increased, my sleep quality went up (according to my Zeo data), my cholesterol levels improved, and my food cravings went away. However, I also found that measuring everything I ate was a pain, I didn’t really kn Continue reading >>

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