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Ketone Meter Singapore

Abbott's New Precision Neo Meter Lacks Features, Aims To 'skip The Copay'

Abbott's New Precision Neo Meter Lacks Features, Aims To 'skip The Copay'

If a glucose meter could make cappuccino, I’d be all over that. That's what I expected with Abbott Diabetes Care’s newest meter, the FreeStyle Precision Neo, launched here in the States earlier this Spring. But sadly, the meter doesn’t deliver on the promise of delivering my metaphoric cappuccino. It hardly even brews drip coffee, if we’re keeping to the caffeine analogy. An international version of this meter has been available outside the U.S. for more than a year, going by the FreeStyle Optimum Neo name, and the FreeStyle Precision Neo finally made it to the American market in mid-April following FDA regulatory approval last fall. Since both go by the “Neo” name, you might think this Americanized version would offer the same features as its international cousin does -- checking glucose, testing blood ketones, tracking insulin, and warning us of high or low patterns. But that’s not the case, unfortunately. The Precision Neo is as skinny as a supermodel and looks pretty good for a glucose meter, but that’s about all it has going for it. Once again, as it has done in the past, Abbott has castrated an innovative device for the American market by eliminating the bells and whistles that made it special. The reason, according to Abbott, is by design: they’re marketing this to people with diabetes in the States who don’t want to fuss with insurance, or worry about excessive copays or high costs of test strips. The lower-cost Precision Neo goes for $22 to $28 for the meter itself, and the strips range from $14 to $17 for a box of 25. Of course, lower-cost meters and strips have been around in some stores for a long time, but traditionally they haven’t been from the big-name brands. Not until recently, that is. With this Precision Neo meter targeted at th Continue reading >>

Diagnostic Accuracy Of Point-of-care Testing For Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Emergency-department Triage

Diagnostic Accuracy Of Point-of-care Testing For Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Emergency-department Triage

OBJECTIVE In the emergency department, hyperglycemic patients are screened for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) via a urine dipstick. In this prospective study, we compared the test characteristics of point-of-care β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) analysis with the urine dipstick. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Emergency-department patients with blood glucose ≥250 mg/dL had urine dipstick, chemistry panel, venous blood gas, and capillary β-OHB measurements. DKA was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS Of 516 hyperglycemic subjects, 54 had DKA. The urine dipstick had a sensitivity of 98.1% (95% CI 90.1–100), a specificity of 35.1% (30.7–39.6), a positive predictive value of 15% (11.5–19.2), and a negative predictive value of 99.4% (96.6–100) for DKA. Using the manufacturer-suggested cutoff of >1.5 mmol/L, β-OHB had a sensitivity of 98.1% (90.1–100), a specificity of 78.6% (74.5–82.2), a positive predictive value of 34.9% (27.3–43), and a negative predictive value of 99.7% (98.5–100) for DKA. CONCLUSIONS Point-of-care β-OHB and the urine dipstick are equally sensitive for detecting DKA (98.1%). However, β-OHB is more specific (78.6 vs. 35.1%), offering the potential to significantly reduce unnecessary DKA work-ups among hyperglycemic patients in the emergency department. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This prospective, observational study was conducted at a large, urban emergency department. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and study participants provided written informed consent. The cohort studied represents a convenience sample of emergency-department patients with triage capillary blood glucose ≥250 mg/dL enrolled on 320 individual days over a 2-year period based on research-assistant availability. Subjects we Continue reading >>

About Centrivet™ Gk Blood Glucose & Ketone Monitoring System

About Centrivet™ Gk Blood Glucose & Ketone Monitoring System

The CentriVet™ Blood Glucose & Ketone Monitoring System is a dual glucose and ketone meter made specifically with animals in mind. The species specific code chip technology means that you get accurate results for every animal, the way it should be. With fast test timing, 5 and 10 seconds for glucose and ketones, you can have your animal’s result in the palm of your hand, wherever that is. • Small 0.8 µL and 1.2 µL sample size for glucose and ketones • 5 seconds for glucose results and 10 seconds for ketone results • Clinically proven accuracy • Audible fill detection reduces wasted strips The CentriVet™ GK Blood Glucose & Ketone Monitoring System is compatible with the CentriVet™ Blood Glucose Test Strips and the CentriVet™ Blood Ketone Test Strips as well as the CentriVet™ Glucose Control Solution and CentriVet™ Ketone Control Solution. The CentriVet™ GK Blood Glucose & Ketone Monitoring System is ideal for use in veterinary clinics, emergency animal hospitals, for mobile vets, farm, and home use because of its portability and size. Feature Specification Measurement Range Glucose: 10-600 mg/dL (0.6 – 33.3 mmol/L) β-Ketone: 0.0 – 8.0 mmol/L Minimum Sample Size Glucose: 0.8 µL β-Ketone: 1.2 µL Test Time Glucose: 5 seconds β-Ketone: 10 seconds Sample Glucose: capillary, venous β-Ketone: capillary, venous Battery Life 3,000 tests Memory Up to 450 records with date and time Automatic Shutoff 2 minutes after last action or after strip removal Meter Size 90.3 x 58 x 19.4 mm Display Size 40.2 x 36 mm Operating Temperature 41-113˚F (5-45 ˚C) Operating Relative Humidity 10-90% (non-condensing) Hematocrit Range 20 – 60% for both Glucose and Ketone Item Contents Item Code For customers ordering in the United States CentriVet™ GK Blood Gluc Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

Ketones are harmful chemicals which your body produces when there is too little or no insulin Ketones are harmful chemicals which your body produces when there is too little or no insulin. When you detect ketones in your body, it is a warning sign that your blood glucose level is too high and you need to bring it down immediately. How to Check for Ketones?​​ ​The easiest way to check for ketones is to use a urine or blood ketone test. Your doctor or nurse can advise you on which ketone test to use. Most ketone test kits come in packages of strips or individually wrapped strips (which can be kept longer). To get accurate results from ketone tests, follow instructions carefully. If you are not sure, always ask your doctor or nurse to show you. ​​​​​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Here’s how most urine ketone tests work: ​​ ​ First, check that the strips are not beyond their expiry date. ​ ​Collect a sample of your urine in a clean container. ​ Place a strip in the urine sample. Alternatively, pass it through your urine stream. ​ Shake off excess urine from the strip. ​ Wait for the strip to change colour. ​ Compare the strip to the colour chart on the strip bottle to get an indication of the amount of ketones in your urine. ​​ Record your results​​ ​​ ​ When to Check for Ketones? Check for ketones if you have any of these symptoms: your blood glucose is 14 mmol/L or higher ​​ ​fatigue ​ constant thirst or a dry mouth ​ frequent urination ​ blurry vision (as if you’re looking through a dirty window) ​ vomiting ​ diarrhoea ​ have trouble breathing ​ ​ When to Seek Help? If the ketone test shows small or trace amounts of ketones, it could mean that ketone is starting to build up in your Continue reading >>

Assessment Of A Hand-held Blood Ketone Meter In Clinical Practice

Assessment Of A Hand-held Blood Ketone Meter In Clinical Practice

Assessment of a Hand-Held Blood Ketone Meter in Clinical Practice Aim: Point-of-care blood keton Aim: Point-of-care blood ketone testing is useful in distinguishing between ketosis and simple hyperglycaemia. This is especially so in cases where urine ketone testing is either not possible due to anuria or in cases where urine ketones are falsely negative. The aim of our study was to validate the usefulness of a hand-held blood ketone meter in the diagnosis of hyperglycaemic emergencies in the emergency department and to establish guidelines for the interpretation of blood ketone levels.[br]Methods: In this prospective study, patients with known or newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus presenting to our tertiary care emergency department and found to have a random capillary glucose of [ge] 14 mmol/l were eligible for inclusion. Measurements of capillary blood beta-hydroxybutyrate ([beta]-OHB) (Optium meter, Medisense/Abbott[trade]) and urine ketones (Ketostix[reg]) were done for all these patients. [beta]-OHB of 0.6 mmol/l and above is considered elevated by the manufacturer. Patients with elevated [beta]-OHB but without acidosis (i.e. pH [gt] 7.3) are classified as diabetic ketosis (DK). [br]Results: 111 patients (7 with type 1 diabetes) were enrolled during the study period. 7 patients had diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), 14 had DK and 90 had simple hyperglycaemia. The median [beta]-OHB levels were 5.7 (4.3 [ndash] 6.0) mmol/l, 1.7 (0.6 [ndash] 3.2) mmol/l, and 0.0 (0.0 [ndash] 0.5) mmol/l, respectively. There was a positive correlation between capillary [beta]-OHB and urine ketones (r=0.673, p[lt]0.001). One patient with DKA had negative urine ketone but [beta]-OHB level of 5.7 mmol/l at point-of-care. Plasma glucose was statistically different between the DKA and DK groups, 4 Continue reading >>

Ketone, Blood

Ketone, Blood

Back To Previous Page Lab Section Category Clinical Biochemistry Click here to find out more about the write-up. Specimen Required 3mL Heparin blood Do not centrifuge as whole blood is required. Method Electrochemical Reference Interval/Value From 0 day : 0.0 – 0.6 mmol/L Turnaround Time Mean = 4 hrs, Range: 3 - 5hrs Day(s) Test Set up Daily, 24 hrs STAT Back To Previous Page Continue reading >>

A New Toy Measuring Blood Ketones

A New Toy Measuring Blood Ketones

I just got a new toy: a device for measuring blood ketones. This is a far more exact and reliable measurement than testing for urine ketones using cheap dipsticks. Ketosis is of course the state the body is in when eating very low carb. Ketones, made from fat, will then fuel the brain instead of glucose. So who needs one of these gadgets? Perhaps nobody. Obviously it’s easy to eat LCHF without it. This is for curious nerds (like me) and for those who want definite proof that they are eating so little carbs that insulin levels are low and fat burning is maximized. A ketone level somewhere between 1.5 – 3 is said to be an optimal level for maximizing weight loss. It means that insulin levels are very low. As you can see my first measurement was 0.2, after a caesar sallad dinner. I’m not surprised as I’ve probably eaten at least 50 grams of carbs a day lately. I will try it out fasting in the mornings during the coming days. Perhaps I’ll try being really strict with the carbs for a while to see what happens. Have you tried one of these or are you interested in doing it? Continue reading >>

Glucose Ketone Meter

Glucose Ketone Meter

The European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology, Diabetes UK, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Australian Diabetes Association, and American Diabetes Association, concur that glucose levels > 14 mmol/L (250 mg/dL) combined with elevated blood ketones indicate DKA, a potentially life threatening complication of hyperglycemia. All cases of hyperglycemia (glucose > 14mmol/L or 250mg/dL) in combination with an acute clinical condition1 All cases of hyperglycemia when a diabetic patient is hospitalized1 During acute illness or stress or when blood glucose levels are consistently elevated (e.g. >17 mmol/L or 300 mg/dL) 2 DKA patients monitored by ß-OHB left the ICU 6.5 hours earlier than patients monitored with urine ketones: - 29.8% cost savings for lab tests and - 70.2% reduction in clinical assessment5 DKA patients monitored by blood ketone reached an end-point for intravenous therapy after 17 hours versus 28 hours for patients monitored by urine ketone testing6 1 Guerci N et al. Advantage to using capillary blood B-hydroxybutyrate determination for the detection and treatment of diabetic ketosis. Diabetes & Metabolism, Vo 31, No 4, 2005 2 American Diabetes Association. Tests of Glycemia in Diabetes. Diabetes Care 2004; 27(suppl.1). 3 Sheikh-Ali M et al. Can Serum B-Hydroxybutyrate Be Used to Diagnose Diabetic Ketoacidosis? Diabetes Care, Volume 31, No 4, April 2008. 4 Charles R A et al. Point-of-care blood ketone testing: screening for diabetic ketoacidosis at the emergency department. Singapore Med J. 2007 Nov;48(11). 5 Vanelli M et al. The direct measurement of 3-beta-hydroxy butyrate enhances the management of diabetic ketoacidosis in children and reduces time and costs of treatment. Diabetes Nutr Metab, 2003 Oct-Dec;1(5-6) 6 Noyes KJ et al. Hydroxybutyrate near-p Continue reading >>

Research Paper Implementing Point Of Care Blood Ketone Testing In The Emergency Department

Research Paper Implementing Point Of Care Blood Ketone Testing In The Emergency Department

Summary Background Rapid and accurate testing of blood ketone levels (BKL) can assist in the assessment of insulin insufficiency and detection of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in the acute care setting. We assessed the potential for introducing point of care measurement of BKL into an Australian emergency department. After providing informed consent, 72 patients (80 separate presentations) with insulin-requiring diabetes who presented to an emergency department with hyperglycaemia (capillary blood glucose level of ≥10.0 mmol/L) underwent testing for BKL at triage. Staff were guided by a protocol developed for interpretation of elevated BKL ≥ 1.0 mmol/L and subsequent actions. Urine ketones and arterial blood gas testing occurred as usual. Time to testing was recorded for all measures. BKL testing occurred immediately in 91% of the presentations, whereas urine ketones and arterial blood gas testing was uncommon (24% and 15% respectively) and not immediate. Elevated BKL (≥1.0 mmol/L) occurred in 17% of presentations, of whom five were diagnosed with DKA within the Emergency Department. However, testing for BKL decreased over the duration of the study. Patients most frequently tested for BKL were younger (58.59 years) than patients who were not tested (79.5 years) (p = .011). Conclusions Implementation of point of care BKL testing in the Emergency Department can assist in the detection of significant numbers of patients with insulin insufficiency, however, ongoing education and support is required to sustain the change in practice. Continue reading >>

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