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Ketone Levels Chart

Testing For Ketones

Testing For Ketones

Testing for Ketones 3 Types of Ketones How to go about testing for Ketones? There are 3 types of ketone bodies. Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB, though technically not really a ketone body) The body (the liver) converts long and medium chain fatty acids into BHB and Acetoacetate. BHB and Acetoacetate live in reversible equilibrium (they can transform back and forth). Acetoacetate can also be turned into acetone. After converted to acetone, it can not be converted back. Acetone is typically excreted through the urine or breath. If your body has been in ketosis for a while, you will see a reduction in acetoacetate. Muscles begin to use acetoacetate and turn it into Beta-Hydroxybutryate for fuel, so less is present in urine as you get more keto-adapted. This is the flaw of the urine test. It only tests for acetoacetate so it will go down as your body gets more efficient at using ketones for fuel. 3 Methods for Testing Ketones Urine strips only test acetoacetate. Ketonix only tests acetone in breath. Blood Strips test for Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB), what your body uses for fuel. 1. Urine Test Strips Pros: Cheap. Cons: Very inaccurate in testing level of ketosis. Our bodies excrete excess ketones in two ways. Through the urine or through the breath. When you are testing for ketones in urine you will typically see higher levels in early stages of a ketogenic diet because your body isn’t using ketones for fuel yet. After you are fully Keto-Adapted (2-4 weeks or so), you will see less and less ketones in your urine because your body in now using more ketones for fuel instead of excreting them through the urine or breath. The urine test strip is also very susceptible to changes based on your state of hydration. The more hydrated you are (and we should all b Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing

Ketone Testing

Tweet Ketone testing is a key part of type 1 diabetes management as it helps to prevent a dangerous short term complication, ketoacidosis, from occurring. If you have type 1 diabetes, it is recommended that you have ketone testing supplies on your prescription. Ketone testing may also be useful in people with other types of diabetes that are dependent upon insulin. Why test for ketones? Ketones are produced by the body as an alternative source of energy to sugar. The body produces ketones by breaking down fats, this process is known as ketosis. Ketones may be produced as part of weight loss, however, it’s important for people with diabetes on insulin to note that ketones can be produced when the body has insufficient insulin. When the body has too little insulin, it means that cells of the body cannot take in enough sugar from the blood. To compensate for this, the body will start to break down fat to provide ketones. However, if a high level of ketones is produced, this can cause the blood to become acidic which can lead to illness and even potential danger to organs if not treated in time. This state is referred to as diabetic ketoacidosis. Where can I get ketone testing kits and sensors? The most accurate way of testing for ketones is to use a meter that measures blood ketone levels. The following blood glucose meters are able to test blood ketone levels in addition to blood glucose levels: Abbott - FreeStyle Optium Neo Menarini - GlucoMen LX Plus If you take insulin, you should be able to get these prescribed by your GP. You can also test urine for ketone levels, however, urine ketone testing is not as accurate as blood ketone testing as the levels of ketones in the urine will usually only reflect a level of up to a few hours previously. When to test for ketones? Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

Ketones Urine Test

Ketones Urine Test

Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that you can buy at a drug store. The kit contains dipsticks coated with chemicals that react with ketone bodies. A dipstick is dipped in the urine sample. A color change indicates the presence of ketones. This article describes the ketone urine test that involves sending collected urine to a lab. A clean-catch urine sample is needed. The clean-catch method is used to prevent germs from the penis or vagina from getting into a urine sample. To collect your urine, the health care provider may give you a special clean-catch kit that contains a cleansing solution and sterile wipes. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate. Continue reading >>

Sick Day Management And Ketones

Sick Day Management And Ketones

Children with diabetes generally do not become unwell any more frequently than children without diabetes. When a child with diabetes is unwell, however, they need extra care and attention from an adult who has received training from a specialist diabetes team. Children with diabetes generally do not become unwell any more frequently than children without diabetes. When a child with diabetes is unwell, however, they need extra care and attention from an adult who has received appropriate training from a specialist diabetes team. It is important that you notify the diabetes team urgently if your child with diabetes is unwell with fever, vomiting, or diarrhoea. Illness associated with vomiting and diarrhoea (for example, gastroenteritis) may result in low blood glucose levels. Illnesses, particularly those associated with fever, raise blood glucose levels because of higher levels of stress. If the blood glucose level remains persistently high (more than 15 mmol/l) for a number of hours, a child will likely develop symptoms such as thirst, drinking a lot and going to the toilet frequently. They may become very tired and lethargic and feel unwell. Ketones can develop with illness. High levels of ketones, can contribute to nausea and vomiting, leading to decreased food and fluid intake, higher levels of ketones, and dehydration. Ketones and ketone monitoring Ketones in diabetes indicate that there is too little insulin in the body. Ketones are chemicals in the blood which come from the breakdown of fat. The body makes ketones as an alternative source to glucose in some situations. When there are ketones in the blood they will also be found in the urine. Ketone testing should be done more frequently when your child with diabetes is unwell and particularly if blood glucose leve Continue reading >>

How To Read Blood Ketone Test Results

How To Read Blood Ketone Test Results

If you are living with diabetes, chances are you've probably had your blood or urine tested for ketones. When your body doesn't have enough insulin to absorb glucose it breaks down fats for energy, creating ketones as a byproduct. Everyone produces ketones, but if you have diabetes, you have a greater risk of ketones building up in your blood, which can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis. Both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes can develop diabetic ketoacidosis. That said, it is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. Interpreting Your Blood Test Results Ketone blood testing is the preferred method for assessing the presence of ketones during times of sickness. Urine test strips can be used, but the American Diabetes Association recommends using blood ketone tests because they are more accurate and timely. Blood ketone tests use different measurements than the numbers you are familiar with on your glucose meter. When using a combination home blood glucose and ketone meter, such as the Precision Xtra Meter by Abbott Labs, or if you have your blood drawn and assessed at a lab, the results will fall into one of the following three ranges: Below 0.6 mmol/L: If your reading is below 0.6 you are in the normal range. 0.6 to 1.5 mmol/L: If your number is in this range you have the presence of ketones in your blood, which may develop into a problem if not treated. You should be in touch with your healthcare provider and follow his or her instructions. Above 1.5 mmol/L: Readings above 1.5 indicate a greater risk for developing ketoacidosis (DKA). You should immediately contact your healthcare provider for advice. Readings above 3.0 mmd/L may warrant a trip to the nearest emergency room for immediate treatment. If you are testing your blood or urine at home and are concerned ab Continue reading >>

Reference Range

Reference Range

Acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone are ketone bodies. In carbohydrate-deficient states, fatty-acid metabolism spurs acetoacetate accumulation. The reduction of acetoacetate in the mitochondria results in beta-hydroxybutyrate production. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, the predominant ketone bodies, are rich in energy. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate transport energy from the liver to other tissues. Acetone forms from the spontaneous decarboxylation of acetoacetate. Acetone is the cause of the sweet odor on the breath in persons with ketoacidosis. [1, 2] Ketone bodies fuel the brain with an alternative source of energy (close to two thirds of its needs) during periods of prolonged fasting or starvation, when the brain cannot use fatty acids for energy. The reference range for ketone is a negative value, at less than 1 mg/dL (< 0.1 mmol/L). [3] Continue reading >>

Smackfat Ketone Strips: Urine Ketone Testing Strips For Keto Dieters

Smackfat Ketone Strips: Urine Ketone Testing Strips For Keto Dieters

Those who subscribe to a high fat and low carbohydrate diet have very good reasons for doing so—whether they are diabetic or need to change their diets for their own health and well being, gaining energy or to lose weight. The ideal state for many who subscribe to a low-carbohydrate diet is called ketosis where the body uses ketones as fuel rather than glucose. So, if you are here, you probably want to know if you are in ketosis or not. The Smackfat Ketone Strips are essential in reading your ketone levels easily and painlessly, so you can have time to do other things, eliminating stress and allowing you to focus on other needs and enjoying the delicious food that comes with your new ketogenic lifestyle. The last thing you’ll want to worry about is complications with reading your ketone levels: Smackfat’s Ketone Strips make the process easy and adjusting your diet a breeze. Features You can expect to find 100 easy-to-read testing strips in their own container, so there will be enough to last through frequent testing. Smackfat Ketone test strips are formulated for easy urinalysis—just insert a strip into a urine sample and wait a short time for the strip to change color. A handy chart on the side of the container will tell you if your ketone levels are too high, too low or where they should be, allowing you to adjust your diet accordingly. A color chart on the side of the container ranges from beige, indicating very low levels, to burgundy, indicating very high levels. With the Smackfat Ketone test strips, you’ll never be in the dark about your own ketone levels. Smackfat provides much more than just easy ketone testing—you can find educational videos both on how to use the strips and how to lead a healthy ketogenic lifestyle. For easy and supportive ketone t Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Ketone Testing

Hyperglycemia And Ketone Testing

Background Hyperglycemia means high blood sugar. For people with type 1 diabetes, hyperglycemia caused by insufficient insulin can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a very serious situation that requires emergency medical treatment. Hyperglycemia can also be caused by eating too much food, which requires treatment to lower blood sugar levels but which does not lead to DKA. The only way to determine between the two situations is through ketone testing. Causes of Hyperglycemia Eating too much food relative to the amount of insulin injected Missing an insulin injection Blockage in insulin pump tubing Disconnected insulin pump infusion set Illness or stress Symptoms of Hyperglycemia Frequent urination Frequent thirst Blurry vision Dry mouth Fatigue Testing for Ketones There are two ways to test for ketones: urine testing and blood testing. Just as blood glucose testing proved to be superior to urine glucose testing, so too is blood ketone testing proving to be better than urine ketone testing. Ketones appear first in the blood, then in the urine after being filtered by the kidneys. Thus the body has been producing ketones for a while before you can detect them in the urine. Children with Diabetes Highly Recommends blood ketone testing over urine ketone testing. Since ketones in the blood can be detected well before ketones in the urine, there is the possibility to treat sooner than you would if you waited for urine testing to show a positive result. Blood ketone testing can be easier for parents who have very young children with diabetes who do not always have the ability to urinate on command. Also, being able to test with a finger stick eliminates the need to find a bathroom to test if you're away from home or when kids are at school. Two recent studies (February 2006) demon Continue reading >>

Getting To Know Ketones

Getting To Know Ketones

People with diabetes, particularly those with Type 1 diabetes, have been at least vaguely aware of the word ketones for a long time. With the recent resurgence of popular interest in low-carbohydrate diets, however, just about everyone seems to be talking about ketones these days. But does anyone really know what ketones are? Are they a danger to your health (as in diabetic ketoacidosis), or a sign that you have lowered your carbohydrate intake enough to cause weight loss (as some people who follow low-carbohydrate diets believe)? What are ketones? Ketones are end-products of fat metabolism in the body. That is, they are formed when fat is burned for energy by the muscles. Chemically, they are acids known as ketone bodies, and there are three types: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, aceto-acetic acid, and acetone. But you don’t have to be a chemist to understand what role they play in the body. To get to know ketones, it’s helpful to understand how your body burns fuel. A simple analogy is that of an automobile. For a car engine to run, the engine must burn fuel (gasoline), and when the fuel is burned, exhaust (carbon monoxide) is created. The carbon monoxide is the end-product of gasoline combustion. Your body also has an engine that must burn fuel to operate. The engine is muscle, and the fuel is fat, carbohydrate (glucose), and, in certain conditions, protein. When fat is burned, the “exhaust” is ketones, and when glucose is burned, the “exhaust” is lactic acid. Fat is more desirable as a fuel than glucose because there are more calories in a gram of fat (9 calories per gram) than there are in a gram of glucose (4 calories per gram), so you get more energy per gram of fat burned. In a sense, you could call fat a high-test fuel. But there is one catch to burning f Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Guidelines

Blood Sugar Guidelines

Absolute numbers vary between pets, and with meter calibrations. The numbers below are as shown on a typical home glucometer while hometesting blood glucose, not necessarily the more accurate numbers a vet would see (though many vets use meters similar to those used in hometesting). For general guidelines only, the levels to watch are approximately: mmol/L mg/dL(US) <2.2 <40 Readings below this level are usually considered hypoglycemic when giving insulin, even if you see no symptoms of it. Treat immediately[1] 2.7-7.5 50-130 Non-diabetic range[2] (usually unsafe to aim for when on insulin, unless your control is very good). These numbers, when not giving insulin, are very good news. 3.2-4.4 57-79 This is an average non-diabetic cat's level[3][4], but leaves little margin of safety for a diabetic on insulin. Don't aim for this range, but don't panic if you see it, either. If the number is not falling, it's healthy. 5 90 A commonly cited minimum safe value for the lowest target blood sugar of the day when insulin-controlled. 7.8 140 According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)[5], threshold above which organ and pancreatic dysfunction may begin in hospitalized humans[6] and the maximum target for post-meal blood glucose in humans.[7] 5.5-10 100-180 Commonly used target range for diabetics, for as much of the time as possible. <10-15 <180-270 "Renal threshold" (varies between individuals, see below), when excess glucose from the kidneys spills into the urine and roughly when the pet begins to show diabetic symptoms. See Hyperglycemia for long-term effects of high blood glucose. 14 250 Approximate maximum safe value for the highest blood sugar of the day, in dogs, who are more sensitive to high blood sugar. Dogs can go blind at this level. Cats Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver breaks down fat to produce ketones. Ketones, on a ketogenic diet, are the primary fuel source for the body. If you’re new to the ketogenic diet and you still have questions, consider reading our Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Keto > There are three main ways to measure the ketones in your body, all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The most common ways to measure are: Blood Ketone Meter. Very accurate but the strips are extremely expensive. Breath Ketone Meters. More accurate than the urine strips, but can sometimes vary in accuracy. Cheaper than blood strips in the long-run. Urine Stricks. This will answer the question “Am I in ketosis?” but will not provide an accurate measure of blood ketones. Scroll down to read a more in-depth analysis of each, and what we recommend for you. Measuring Ketones with Urine Sticks Urine sticks will always be the cheapest and easiest way to measure ketosis. For beginners, this should cover everything you need – there is no point in getting more complex blood strips so early on when you are still trying to understand the nuances of a ketogenic diet. Ultimately, keto sticks are very easy to use – you hold the sticks in your urine stream for a few seconds, and within 10-15 seconds you should notice a color change in the strip (if you are in ketosis). The color of the stick typically is measured in red: light pink being low in ketone production and dark purple being high in ketone production. While keto sticks can be ideal for a general answer to the question “Am I in ketosis?”, they aren’t precise with their accuracy. They measure the acetoacetate in your urine, which is an unused ketone by the body. As you get deeper into ketosis and your body adapts, your b Continue reading >>

Urine Ketone Testing

Urine Ketone Testing

Your body cells use sugar for energy. Insulin must be present for your body cells to use sugar for energy. When there is not enough insulin present your cells cannot use sugar to obtain the energy they need. If your body cannot get energy from sugar, fat is used instead. When fat is broken down, ketones are made. Ketones are strong acids and are harmful to your body. Ketones in your urine may be a sign that you are developing diabetic ketoacidosis. When should you test your urine for ketones? If your blood sugar tests are higher than 250 mg/dL for two or more tests in a row If you are feeling like your blood sugar is high If you think you have an infection If you are throwing up or feel sick to your stomach If you are ill or stressed If you have Type 1 diabetes, you should always have a supply of the strips used for urine ketone testing and know how to use them. If you have Type 2 diabetes, your doctor or nurse will tell you if you need to do urine ketone testing. If you are pregnant your doctor or nurse will tell you when to test your urine for ketones. How do you test your urine for ketones? There are several products that can be used to test the urine for ketones. The test strips can be purchased at a pharmacy and usually do not require a prescription. Ketostix® test strips are commonly used to test the urine for ketones. This is the way you test with a Ketostix®: Dip the test end of the strip into fresh urine. Remove the strip from the urine and wait 15 seconds. Compare the color on the strip with the color chart on the bottle. The urine ketone test will tell you whether you have no ketones present or if you have trace, small, moderate, or large ketones present. If your urine has moderate or large ketones present, call your doctor or nurse right away. Follow the d Continue reading >>

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous and potentially life threatening complication of diabetes, with thousands of preventable cases each year. DKA most commonly happens in people with Type 1 Diabetes although it occasionally occurs in people with insulin-treated Type 2 Diabetes. DKA occurs when there is persistently high glucose and a severe lack of insulin. 10,434 people with Type 1 diabetes hospitalised at least once during 2011-12 ¹ 9% of children experienced DKA in 1 year ² Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period, with the first sign often being hyperglycemia. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) Confusion and sometimes even coma Click here to download the full DKA Information Brochure What are Ketones? Ketones are the by-product of fat metabolism. Ketones can provide the body with energy when glucose is not available. As you know, in order to derive energy from the carbohydrates in the foods that we eat, the body needs insulin. Insulin is the key that unlocks the body’s cells in order to allow glucose to enter to provide energy. In the absence of sufficient insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells and the glucose levels build up in the blood. Without insulin, the body begins to metabolize fat and produces ketones. Ketones can be very dangerous when the blood glucose level is high. If the blood glucose and ketones levels continue to rise, one can get very sick very quickly. The person begins to get dehydrated and acidotic, meaning that the body loses water and salts and the pH falls with a build up of acids, the ketones, developing DKA. What are blood ketones versus urine ketones You may have heard about or learned how to check urine ketones Continue reading >>

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