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Ketone Breath Causes

High Protein Diets And Bad Breath

High Protein Diets And Bad Breath

BULLETINS • Overview • Issues HEALTH A-Z HOT TOPICS NEWSLETTERS High Protein Diets and Bad Breath The Better Life Experts | July 15, 2009 An embarrassing side effect of low carbohydrate diet programs is halitosis (bad breath), commonly experienced within a few days of increasing protein consumption, a frequent companion to the low carb diet. Ketones (smelly chemicals) are produced as the body burns fat and exits through breath, urine and perspiration. A malodorous breath is the curse of dieters (just ask the co-workers, friends, family and just about any other person who comes into close contact with people who consume low carb-high protein foods). Ironically, it is one of the signals that a high protein diet is working, much to the dismay of many people who are on the breath receiving end of conversations with such a dieter. The problem with low carb, high protein diets is that there is an insufficient amount of carbohydrate available for the body to burn off to supply its energy needs. When carbohydrate intake is too low, the liver converts fat molecules into fatty acids and ketone bodies, an alternative to glucose as a source of energy. When excess ketones (acetones) are produced, it can create an unhealthy state we call ketosis. Ketosis can lead to many health problems and is actually dangerous in extreme cases. Since most high protein diets limit the amount of carbohydrates you are allowed to eat, your body has no choice but to break down fat and other tissues, releasing ketones into your system. “Keto breath” is sometimes noticeable on people who are on very low calorie diets or on people with poorly controlled diabetes. Some people describe the odor as smelling like a combination of nail polish and rotten pineapple. Another source of bad breath is the bac Continue reading >>

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

A lot of people are confused by the term “ketosis.” You may read that it is a “dangerous state” for the body, and it does sound abnormal to be “in ketosis.” But ketosis merely means that our bodies are using fat for energy. Ketones (also called ketone bodies) are molecules generated during fat metabolism, whether from the fat in the almonds you just ate or fat you were carrying around your middle. When our bodies are breaking down fat for energy, most of it gets converted to energy, but ketones are also produced as part of the process. When people eat less carbohydrates, their bodies turn to fat for energy, so it makes sense that more ketones are generated. Some of those ketones (acetoacetate and ß-hydroxybutyrate) are used for energy; the heart muscle and kidneys, for example, prefer ketones to glucose. Most cells, including the brain cells, are able to use ketones for at least part of their energy. Is ketosis a bad thing? There is an assumption that if a body is burning a lot of fat for energy, it must not be getting “enough” glucose. However, there is no indication, from studying people on reduced carbohydrate diets, that this is the case (though there is usually a short period of adjustment, less than a week, in most cases). It takes about 72 hours to burn up all of the reserve glycogen (sugar loads). Although it’s true that our bodies can’t break fat down directly into glucose (though, interestingly, they easily use glucose to make fat), our bodies can convert some of the protein we eat into glucose. Indeed, this works well for people who don’t tolerate a lot of sugar, because this conversion happens slowly so it doesn’t spike blood glucose. What is the danger of ketosis? It is important that if you are following a ketogenic nutritional pro Continue reading >>

6 Simple Ways To Get Rid Of Ketosis Breath

6 Simple Ways To Get Rid Of Ketosis Breath

Is your breath starting to smell a little funky on the ketogenic diet? Don’t worry, ketosis breath is a common side effect. Here are easy, simple ways to get rid of it. Going on a low carb diet has become a popular way of losing fat and helping to treat some health conditions. The essence of low-carbing is to get most of your calories in the form of fat, protein, and leafy greens, rather than starchy carbs. Do you struggle with bloating, gas, constipation, or other digestive issues? We’ve created a FREE guide to healing your gut naturally. Click here to get your FREE copy of our Digestion Guide! While there are many benefits to starting a low carb diet, you can also experience several unpleasant side effects. The common one we’re going to discuss here is ketosis breath and how you can get rid of it. What is Ketosis Breath? When you go on a strict low carb diet, you’ll probably notice that your breath begins to have a unique, fruity, and sometimes even nail-polish-like smell. To understand why this happens, it helps to have a little background on how your body reacts to a low carb diet. Firstly, the body’s main energy source is glucose, which comes from carbohydrates. When you go on a low carb diet, your body is unable to find any of this fuel, so it enlists it’s backup option: burning fat for energy (1). The problem with ketones is that they contain acetone as part of their makeup, which is what gives them their characteristic smell. When your body begins to burn fat for fuel instead of sugar or carbs (yay, fat loss!) it produces substances called ketones in the process. This state is also referred to as “ketosis,” which is where the nickname “keto” in keto breath comes from. The main way your body burns off ketones is through urine and, you guessed Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath Symptoms

Ketosis Breath Symptoms

If you eat foods with strong odors, such as garlic or onions, the smells will accompany your breath. ” Stomach Discomfort / Mild Nausea / Cramping Trouble Sleeping or Staying Asleep (early waking) Water weight loss (perhaps an excessive loss of weight within the first two weeks) Frequent Urination Allergies or cold like symptoms may flair up. It's probably not as bad as I made it sound but you will experience bad breath. The body then 17 Oct 2017 Sometimes a low-carb diet or ketogenic can cause bad breath. The most infamous symptoms of ketosis is a smelly mouth. However, we've constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you've Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions for Bad Breath. 7 Oct 2016 Positive Symptoms of Ketosis. A breath analyzer monitors acetone, one of the three main ketones present in your blood during ketosis. It could be “fruity” — it's been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic. The change in the way your 28 Jul 2015 Many diets come with unexpected side effects that could cause your friends and family to steer clear of you. The process of burning fat via Ketosis releases compounds known as Ketones, which result in foul smelling breath and can even cause general body odor problems. ” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you're in ketosis. This is however not a 100% solution and it is still possible that people will notice your ketosis breath. Prior to starting one of these nutrition plans, it is imperative that you purchase Diabetic ketoacidosis symptoms. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. 5 Sep 2017 Although the long-term risks of ketosis are not clear, there is some evidence t Continue reading >>

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The keto (low carb, LCHF or whatever you want to call it) diet isn’t all bacon, weight loss and happiness. One of the side effects of being in ketosis can be bad breath, also known as keto breath. Sometimes you get it when you’re starting out with a ketogenic diet and have the keto flu. I’ve learned how to keep keto breath under control so it doesn’t bother me much these days. But when I get dehydrated I start getting that metallic taste in my mouth and know it’s probably keto breath. Luckily I know how to fix it now! Who gets it? Since I’ve been on my keto journey, I’ve encountered 3 types of people: People who don’t get keto breath at all – I don’t know why they’re so lucky. Ketosis just doesn’t seem to affect their breath at all. I have no idea why their bodies react differently. People who sometimes get keto breath – Some people don’t feel the keto breath for days and then suddenly it hits them. It can also be worse around the same time each day. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s when they’re starting to get hungry. People who constantly have keto breath – They have it 24/7, some of them can get rid of it temporarily with tricks (I´ll list some below) but some are unfortunately just beyond that. Honestly, I’m not a medical professional and I can’t explain why everyone’s different when it comes to keto breath. You can have two people who eat the exact same low carb food, one of them gets it and the other one doesn’t. Maybe it has something to do with the individuals metabolism. I’d love to hear from anyone who can explain this to me. What is keto breath like? Most people describe it as a fruity, acetone like smell. It can be quite strong. Some people who suffer from it say that they can feel it and almost taste it, like a Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes And Prevention

Ketosis Breath: Causes And Prevention

Bad breath isn’t life threatening or a health problem but rather socially embarrassing. Usually, bad breath is associated with poor oral hygiene or from eating garlic for lunch. However, adopting a ketogenic diet may be the cause of bad breath. The ketogenic diet has a plethora of amazing health benefits such as, improving fat burning, brain function and reduces inflammation. House of Keto Monitor™ is an accurate breath based device developed to measure the ketone levels in your system. Shortly after starting a ketogenic diet many people report foul breath or a bad taste in their math. This is extremely common and fortunately can be overturned. Find out more: House of Keto Monitor™ Causes Excess Protein People often consume protein as their primary source of calories when adopting a ketogenic diet as they’re reluctant to eating high amounts of fat. When someone consumes higher amounts of protein, ammonia is set free from the body through the breath. The smell varies from fruity or similar to apples that are fermenting or rotting. A high protein diet inhibits the ability to get into ketosis because excess proteins can actually be converted into sugar through gluconeogenesis. It’s also difficult to digest and can have negative impacts on the gut. Ketone Release When we begin burning fat as our primary fuel source as an outcome the body tends to churn out different byproducts. The main byproduct is the ketone compounds which are what are necessary for energy in a ketogenic diet. However, one type of ketone, acetone, is released into the breath and may have a fruity odor, just like the ammonia from the excess protein. Solutions Reduce Protein Intake It’s completely possible to eat a low carb diet without producing a foul odor. The key here is to only eat as much Continue reading >>

Reference Range

Reference Range

Acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone are ketone bodies. In carbohydrate-deficient states, fatty-acid metabolism spurs acetoacetate accumulation. The reduction of acetoacetate in the mitochondria results in beta-hydroxybutyrate production. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, the predominant ketone bodies, are rich in energy. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate transport energy from the liver to other tissues. Acetone forms from the spontaneous decarboxylation of acetoacetate. Acetone is the cause of the sweet odor on the breath in persons with ketoacidosis. [1, 2] Ketone bodies fuel the brain with an alternative source of energy (close to two thirds of its needs) during periods of prolonged fasting or starvation, when the brain cannot use fatty acids for energy. The reference range for ketone is a negative value, at less than 1 mg/dL (< 0.1 mmol/L). [3] Continue reading >>

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

On measuring Ketones. Like many people, when I first started a Ketogenic diet in early 2014 I bought the Ketostix and just couldn’t wait to see the color change. And change it did! It was neat, and it provided motivation for me to continue. Eventually, I got a blood meter, a breath meter and spent lots of time (and money) testing ketones. Between a Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer, as well as dozens of blood ketone test strips, I’ve probably spent well over $500 testing ketones. The main thing I learned from my extensive ketone testing regimen is that the results vary widely and there’s little application to my goals. Eventually, I stopped testing and here are several reasons why: 1. Burning fatty acids from fat is the main benefit of a ketogenic diet On a ketogenic diet, some of the brain’s energetic demand is fueled by ketones, but the heart, muscles, etc. are fueled by fatty acids. Most of the energy we utilize both at rest and at sub-maximal exertion on a ketogenic diet is fatty acid, not ketones. Quoting Dr. Ron Rosedale on chasing ketones at the Keto Summit: “I don’t want people to have the mindset that it’s the ketones that are the benefit of the diet. They are a beneficial side effect, but the main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids from fat. The more fatty acids from fat you are burning, the less glucose you need to burn. And that’s really where you are getting the benefit…So ketones are great but the term ketogenic diet indicating that the diet is so good because you are generating all these ketones is a misinterpretation of the benefit. The main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids, and as a side effect of burning fatty acids you are producing ketones that your body can burn too!” 2. Urine Ketones aka “peetones” are ridic Continue reading >>

Ketosis Bad Breath Remedy For Dry Mouth

Ketosis Bad Breath Remedy For Dry Mouth

Individuals following a ketogenic or low carb diet often see significant results. However, there are often various side effects. One of the most common side effects is what some call “keto breath” or diet bad breath. With little or no carbs, ketosis dry mouth is common. Few know that a prolonged dry mouth, however, can cause lasting damage to your teeth and gums. Although it is expected as normal with this way of eating, it should always be taken seriously. Keto Breath – Why does it Happen? Keto breath is a term used to describe intensely bad breath that occurs in individuals who are using a low-carbohydrate and high-fat diet. This stimulates the ketosis process within the body. Ketosis is a specific metabolic state in which the number of ketones present in the body’s tissues is higher than what is considered normal. Low carb dieters believe ketosis is the ideal state because it encourages the body to burn stored fat. Ketones, especially acetone, a specific form of ketone, are excreted by the breath and through urine. Keto breath often creates a fruit-like smell that is particularly strong. It is not only possible to smell it, but also to taste it. A metallic, dry-mouth feeling tends to occur. Acetone Breath — An Unpleasant Realty For those on a low carb diet, keto breath seems like a distraction. However, it is a warning sign for a potential problem. In terms of the diet and your overall health, this type of breath is not necessarily a bad thing. However, it causes changing conditions within the mouth. The drying out of the mouth is very worrisome for a number of reasons. Most importantly, it encourages the production of potentially harmful bacteria. These bacteria can cause significant damage to your gums and teeth if left unchecked. It is also important to Continue reading >>

Why Do We Develop Bad Breath While Fasting?

Why Do We Develop Bad Breath While Fasting?

Friends and others who come into contact with the sufferer hesitate to apprise him of the condition for fear of hurting his sentiments. Some people believe that it is incurable! According to a recent post by cosmetic dentist Houston assistant, Jennifer, Bad breath usually results from periodontal diseases – disease of the gums and other structures supporting teeth, ill-fitting dentures, carious teeth, poor oral hygiene, metabolic activity of bacteria in plaque or putrefaction of sulfide-yielding food (proteins), etc. Contributory factors are smoking, alcohol, sinusitis, lung disease and less commonly diseases of the esophagus. Locally retained bacteria metabolize sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine, methionine) in protein to yield volatile hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptane. These gases have foul smell. Not only do they stink but they also damage the surrounding tissue. Thus they perpetuate bacterial retention and periodontal disease. At night and between meals conditions are optimal for odor production. That is one reason why we develop bad breath while fasting. So eating regularly may help prevent bad breath. (Breath fresheners may help). Some people advise brushing the tongue, a practice common in India. Periodic scaling will, of course, help. Prolonged fasting may cause a condition called Ketosis. This is from burning of too much fat. Ketosis does not result from just overnight fasting. Fasting has to be longer than that to give rise to ketosis. The body has enough glucose stored as glycogen to see it through about 24 hours. Beyond that it relies on its fat reserves. All the fat that is mobilized is not burnt in the final common pathway of metabolism — the citric acid cycle. The excess fatty acid — acetic acid — gets diverted to the pathway for the f Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Gerrards Cross, England (for one year) then Dresher, Pennsylvania, USA: My six year old adopted son has had acetone breath consistently for several weeks. I've tested his urine with the strips for glucose and ketones twice, and they are both negative. He has had this previously only when he was slightly dehydrated from bouts of nausea and vomiting. He is otherwise perfectly healthy and active and has no symptoms of diabetes. We have a dog with diabetes which is why I am familiar with the signs and the breath odor and have the urine strips. Are there other causes of acetone breath in an otherwise normal six year old? In view of the negative strips should I still have his blood glucose tested? Answer: Not everyone can smell acetone, but if you can, the most sensitive vehicle is the breath which may explain why urine testing has been negative. Ketosis in children can occur when the body is unable to get sufficient basal energy needs from the metabolism of carbohydrate and resorts to the breakdown of fat stores with the production of ketones. This can occur because of diabetes, but, as you have noticed, this is most likely to occur when appetite is diminished by intercurrent illness. The same can happen if energy consumption is increased and a child is too busy to eat sufficiently. I think it very unlikely that what you describe has anything to do with diabetes, but if you have a diabetic dog and the means of measuring blood sugars you might test your son after a period of energetic activity to see if it is low because the phenomenon I have described is called ketotic hypoglycemia. Additional comments from Dr. Andrea Scaramuzza: When you have excluded diabetes, as in the case of your son because both urine and blood glucose are in normal range, you can take i Continue reading >>

Caveman Breath

Caveman Breath

When I first tell people I’m on a Primal Blueprint diet emulating our ancient ancestors, the witty ones are usually quick with a clever comment or two, usually referencing the Flintstones, heavy brow ridges, monosyllabic grunts, or some combination of the three. A hearty laugh is shared (mine being exceedingly polite), and they’ll go on to ask if I’ve experienced increased hair growth, whether or not I met my wife by clubbing her over the head, and if I’ve got caveman breath (always accompanied by a theatrical, exaggerated step backward). What would I do without such comedians? I gotta admit, though, they might have a point about the caveman breath. Although I don’t have a problem with it personally (unless my wife has kept quiet all these years), bad breath is a common complaint I hear about low-carb dieters. Strangely enough, I rarely hear it from actual low-carbers, but rather from overly critical skeptics. Still, bad breath does happen to everyone, and I for one would be wary of engaging Grok in a close heart to heart talk over some fermented mammoth milk. Even on our own comment boards, reader madMUHHH complained about having constant bad breath. Of course, he was also eating loads of garlic and onions, which are notorious causes of bad breath (regardless of the overall diet), but it does go to show that just because we’re eating healthy Primal foods, it doesn’t mean we’re immune to the ravages of bad breath. Bacteria/Tooth Decay Most bad breath you encounter is probably due to poor dental hygiene. Brushing isn’t enough for some people; sometimes you need to physically remove chunks of food from between your teeth. I doubt Grok was a big brusher, but he probably picked his teeth with bones or sharpened sticks (I think the annoying sensation of mea Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

What Can I Do About Bad Breath While Dieting?

What Can I Do About Bad Breath While Dieting?

During weight loss, ketones (the by-product of fat burning) are excreted through your breath as well as through the urine. Unfortunately, that can cause unpleasant breath for some people who excrete quite a few ketones that way. We generally suggest that people use sugarless gum or breath spray to combat “keto-breath”. It’s also helpful to keep your mouth moist by sipping water throughout the day. Adding a thin, fresh lemon slice to your water also helps. Some people chew a bit of the lemon rind for the fresh flavor. Parsley is also a natural breath freshener, so you may want to chew a sprig of fresh parsley, when convenient. An effective treatment is chlorophyll capsules (one brand recommends taking 90-100 mg a day, usually at night). We generally don’t recommend using sugar- free mints or sugarless candy because many people end up mindlessly consuming more than they realize. In addition, most people forget to account for the carbohydrates and calories contained in the mints or sugarless candy when they calculate their daily intake. Bad breath can be an unpleasant side effect of being in ketosis during Weight Loss; but look at it this way, you’re having this problem because you’re burning so much fat, and that’s not bad at all! Continue reading >>

Ketone Body Metabolism

Ketone Body Metabolism

Ketone body metabolism includes ketone body synthesis (ketogenesis) and breakdown (ketolysis). When the body goes from the fed to the fasted state the liver switches from an organ of carbohydrate utilization and fatty acid synthesis to one of fatty acid oxidation and ketone body production. This metabolic switch is amplified in uncontrolled diabetes. In these states the fat-derived energy (ketone bodies) generated in the liver enter the blood stream and are used by other organs, such as the brain, heart, kidney cortex and skeletal muscle. Ketone bodies are particularly important for the brain which has no other substantial non-glucose-derived energy source. The two main ketone bodies are acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) also referred to as β-hydroxybutyrate, with acetone the third, and least abundant. Ketone bodies are always present in the blood and their levels increase during fasting and prolonged exercise. After an over-night fast, ketone bodies supply 2–6% of the body's energy requirements, while they supply 30–40% of the energy needs after a 3-day fast. When they build up in the blood they spill over into the urine. The presence of elevated ketone bodies in the blood is termed ketosis and the presence of ketone bodies in the urine is called ketonuria. The body can also rid itself of acetone through the lungs which gives the breath a fruity odour. Diabetes is the most common pathological cause of elevated blood ketones. In diabetic ketoacidosis, high levels of ketone bodies are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Ketone bodies The term ‘ketone bodies’ refers to three molecules, acetoacetate (AcAc), 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and acetone (Figure 1). 3HB is formed from the reduction of AcAc i Continue reading >>

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