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Ketone Bodies In Urine

Urine Ketones

Urine Ketones

Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for fuel. Normally these ketones will be completely broken down (metabolised) so that there are very few ketones in the urine. If for any reason the body cannot get enough glucose for energy it will switch to using body fats, causing an increase in ketones in the body. This results in more ketones present in the urine. What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy. Normally, your body gets the energy it needs from carbohydrate in your diet. But stored fat is broken down and ketones are made if your diet does not contain enough carbohydrate to supply the body with sugar (glucose) for energy or if your body can't use blood sugar (glucose) properly. Ketones are usually formed in the liver and are broken down so that very small amounts of ketones appear in the urine. However, when carbohydrates are unavailable (for example, in starvation) or can't to be used as an energy source (for example, in diabetes), fat becomes the main source of energy and large amounts of ketones are made. Therefore, higher levels of ketones in the urine indicate that the body is using fat as the major source of energy. High levels of ketones in your body can cause tummy (abdominal) pain, feeling sick (nausea), being sick (vomiting) and diarrhoea. The ketones that most often appear in the urine when fats are burned for energy are called acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. What are the causes of ketones in the urine? The causes of high levels of ketones and therefore ketones in your urine include: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Starvation: not eating for prolonged periods (for example, 12 to 18 hours). Ketogenic diet (high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet). This can cause an increase in body ketones but much less than DKA and not Continue reading >>

Ketones Urine Test

Ketones Urine Test

Definition A ketone urine test measures the amount of ketones in the urine. Alternative Names Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test How the Test is Performed Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that you can buy at a drug store. The kit contains dipsticks coated with chemicals that react with ketone bodies. A dipstick is dipped in the urine sample. A color change indicates the presence of ketones. This article describes the ketone urine test that involves sending collected urine to a lab. A clean-catch urine sample is needed. The clean-catch method is used to prevent germs from the penis or vagina from getting into a urine sample. To collect your urine, the health care provider may give you a special clean-catch kit that contains a cleansing solution and sterile wipes. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate. How to Prepare for the Test You may have to follow a special diet. Your provider may tell you to temporarily stop taking certain medicines that may affect the test. How the Test will Feel The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort. Why the Test is Performed Ketone testing is most often done if you have type 1 diabetes and: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL Nausea or vomiting occur Pain in the abdomen Ketone testing may also be done: You have an illness such as pneumonia, heart attack, or stroke Nausea or vomiting that does not go away You are pregnant Normal Results A negative test result is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test re Continue reading >>

Tests For Detection Of Ketones In Urine

Tests For Detection Of Ketones In Urine

No method for detection of ketonuria reacts with all the three ketone bodies. Rothera’s nitroprusside method and methods based on it detect acetoacetic acid and acetone (the test is 10-20 times more sensitive to acetoacetic acid than acetone). Ferric chloride test detects acetoacetic acid only. β-hydroxybutyric acid is not detected by any of the screening tests. Methods for detection of ketone bodies in urine are Rothera’s test, Acetest tablet method, ferric chloride test, and reagent strip test. 1. ROTHERA’S’ TEST (Classic Nitroprusside Reaction) Acetoacetic acid or acetone reacts with nitroprusside in alkaline solution to form a purple-colored complex (Figure 822.1). Rothera’s test is sensitive to 1-5 mg/dl of acetoacetate and to 10-25 mg/dl of acetone. Method Take 5 ml of urine in a test tube and saturate it with ammonium sulphate. Add a small crystal of sodium nitroprusside. Mix well. Slowly run along the side of the test tube liquor ammonia to form a layer. Immediate formation of a purple permanganate colored ring at the junction of the two fluids indicates a positive test (Figure 822.2). 2. ACETEST TABLET TEST This is Rothera’s test in the form of a tablet. The Acetest tablet consists of sodium nitroprusside, glycine, and an alkaline buffer. A purplelavender discoloration of the tablet indicates the presence of acetoacetate or acetone (≥ 5 mg/dl). A rough estimate of the amount of ketone bodies can be obtained by comparison with the color chart provided by the manufacturer. The test is more sensitive than reagent strip test for ketones. 3. FERRIC CHLORIDE TEST (Gerhardt’s) Addition of 10% ferric chloride solution to urine causes solution to become reddish or purplish if acetoacetic acid is present. The test is not specific since certain drugs (sal Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of A Nitroprusside Dip Test For Ketone Bodies

Evaluation Of A Nitroprusside Dip Test For Ketone Bodies

The detection of ketone bodies in urine specimens is sufficiently important to warrant the inclusion of a nitroprusside test for ketonuria as a part of the routine urinalysis. In the past, methods available have included a tablet test (Acetest) and the Rothera test, a conventional test tube procedure. Recently the nitroprusside test for urine ketones has been made available as a stick or dip test with a preparation called Ketostix. This test, like the other nitroprusside tests, depends on the reaction between acetoacetic acid and nitroprusside to produce a colored complex. In order to determine the accuracy and simplicity of the new test, it was compared with the two more standard procedures on a series of routine urine specimens in a general hospital laboratory. Tests were also carried out by experienced and inexperienced personnel on urines with and without added acetoacetic acid. The present report describes the results obtained in Continue reading >>

Ketonuria

Ketonuria

Ketonuria is a medical condition in which ketone bodies are present in the urine. It is seen in conditions in which the body produces excess ketones as an indication that it is using an alternative source of energy. It is seen during starvation or more commonly in type I diabetes mellitus. Production of ketone bodies is a normal response to a shortage of glucose, meant to provide an alternate source of fuel from fatty acids. Pathophysiology[edit] Ketones are metabolic end-products of fatty acid metabolism. In healthy individuals, ketones are formed in the liver and are completely metabolized so that only negligible amounts appear in the urine. However, when carbohydrates are unavailable or unable to be used as an energy source, fat becomes the predominant body fuel instead of carbohydrates and excessive amounts of ketones are formed as a metabolic byproduct. Higher levels of ketones in the urine indicate that the body is using fat as the major source of energy. Ketone bodies that commonly appear in the urine when fats are burned for energy are acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Acetone is also produced and is expired by the lungs.[1] Normally, the urine should not contain a noticeable concentration of ketones to give a positive reading. As with tests for glucose, acetoacetate can be tested by a dipstick or by a lab. The results are reported as small, moderate, or large amounts of acetoacetate. A small amount of acetoacetate is a value under 20 mg/dl; a moderate amount is a value of 30–40 mg/dl, and a finding of 80 mg/dl or greater is reported as a large amount. One 2010 study admits that though ketonuria's relation to general metabolic health is ill-understood, there is a positive relationship between the presence of ketonuria after fasting and positive metabo Continue reading >>

Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, And Laboratory Examinations. 3rd Edition.

Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, And Laboratory Examinations. 3rd Edition.

Go to: Ketone bodies (acetoacetic acid, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetone) are insignificant in the blood and urine of normal individuals in the postprandial or overnight-fasted state. However, these ketoacids become important sources of metabolic energy in circumstances in which the availability of glucose is restricted, as during prolonged fasting, or when the ability to use glucose is greatly diminished, as in decompensated diabetes mellitus. During prolonged starvation the arterial concentrations of these metabolically active strong organic acids increase approximately 70-fold to 10 to 12 mM and to significantly higher levels of 30 to 40 mM in diabetic ketoacidosis. The mechanisms responsible for the development of ketonemia are: (1) increased production by the liver; (2) decreased peripheral utilization in muscle; and (3) reduced volume of distribution. Since ketone bodies are not bound to plasma proteins, they are freely filterable solutes in the renal glomerulus and appear quantifiably in the tubular urine. At the very low plasma concentrations of ketone bodies that are encountered normally after an overnight fast, urinary excretion rates are negligible. When plasma levels increase beyond 0.1 to 0.2 mM, however, excretion increases and measurable amounts of ketone bodies appear in the urine. Go to: Two semiquantitative tests are available for the rapid determination of primarily acetoacetate in urine and blood, although they have never been considered totally satisfactory for blood. The ferric chloride test is performed by adding 5 to 10 drops of freshly voided urine to a few drops of a 10% solution of ferric chloride. At first, a precipitate of ferric phosphate forms but with additional drops of urine the precipitate disappears and a burgundy red color appea Continue reading >>

Urine Ketones - Meanings And False Positives

Urine Ketones - Meanings And False Positives

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Urine Ketones article more useful, or one of our other health articles. Description Ketones are produced normally by the liver as part of fatty acid metabolism. In normal states these ketones will be completely metabolised so that very few, if any at all, will appear in the urine. If for any reason the body cannot get enough glucose for energy it will switch to using body fats, resulting in an increase in ketone production making them detectable in the blood and urine. How to test for ketones The urine test for ketones is performed using test strips available on prescription. Strips dedicated to ketone testing in the UK include[1]: GlucoRx KetoRx Sticks 2GK® Ketostix® Mission® Ketone Testing should be performed according to manufacturers' instructions. The sample should be fresh and uncontaminated. Usually the result will be expressed as negative or positive (graded 1 to 4)[2]. Ketonuria is different from ketonaemia (ie presence of ketones in the blood) and often ketonuria does not indicate clinically significant ketonaemia. Depending on the testing strips used, urine testing for ketones either has an excellent sensitivity with a low specificity, or a poor sensitivity with a good specificity. However, this should be viewed in the context of uncertainty of the biochemical level of significant ketosis[3]. Interpretation of results Normally only small amounts of ketones are excreted daily in the urine (3-15 mg). High or increased values may be found in: Poorly controlled diabetes. Starvation: Prolonged vomiting. Rapid weight loss. Frequent strenuous exercise. Poisoning (eg, with isop Continue reading >>

Ketones — Urine

Ketones — Urine

Definition Ketones build up when the body needs to break down fats and fatty acids to use as fuel. This is most likely to occur when the body does not get enough sugar or carbohydrates. A urine test can be done to check the level of ketones in your body. Alternative Names Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones How the test is performed The test requires a clean catch urine sample. To obtain a clean catch sample, men or boys should clean the head of the penis. Women or girls need to wash the area between the lips of the vagina with soapy water and rinse well. As you start to urinate, allow a small amount to fall into the toilet bowl to clear the urethra of contaminants. Then, put a clean container under your urine stream and catch 1 to 2 ounces of urine. Remove the container from the urine stream. Cap and mark the container and give it to the health care provider or assistant. For infants, thoroughly wash the area around the urethra. Open a urine collection bag (a plastic bag with an adhesive paper on one end), and place it on the infant. For boys, the entire penis can be placed in the bag and the adhesive attached to the skin. For girls, the bag is placed over the labia. Diaper as usual over the secured bag. This procedure may take a couple of attempts -- lively infants can displace the bag. The infant should be checked frequently and the bag changed after the infant has urinated into the bag. The urine is drained into the container for transport to the laboratory. Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test" using a dipstick coated with chemicals that react with ketone bodies. The dipstick is dipped in the urine sample, and a color change indicates the presence of ketones. How to prepare for the test You may have to eat a special diet, and you should stop taking a Continue reading >>

Urine - For Ketone, Ketone Bodies (ketonuria)

Urine - For Ketone, Ketone Bodies (ketonuria)

Sample The is done on the urine. Indication It is advised in diabetic patients for the early diagnosis of ketoacidosis. To evaluate the diabetic patient in a coma. Definition Increased ketone bodies in blood are called Ketonemia. Increased excretion in the urine is called Ketonuria. Pathophysiology Ketone bodies are seen in case of decreased availability of carbohydrates like starvation or frequent vomiting. Another possibility is decreased utilization of carbohydrates like diabetes mellitus, and glycogen storage disease. High fat and low carbohydrates diet are ketogenic and increase ketone bodies in the blood. Ketones are the end product of fatty acid catabolism. Ketones are formed when the glucose as a source of energy is not present. This situation happens when there is no insulin so glucose cannot enter the cells. In that case, ketone bodies are the source of energy for the body, particularly to the brain. In case of fasting for 3 to 4 days, then 30 to 40% body energy is provided by the ketone bodies. Ketones bodies are the end product of fatty acid breakdown and consists of : Beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Acetoacetic acid. Acetone. The β- hydroxybutyric acid + acetoacetic acid readily converts to acetone. In the blood: Acetone is the minor amount. Acetoacetate and β- hydroxybutyrate are equal in amount and are the main ketone bodies. in a healthy person, ketones are formed in the liver but there is a negligible amount in urine. The outcome of Increased Ketones in the blood leads to : Electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration. If not corrected then leads to acidosis coma and ultimately death. Ketones are present in the urine when a threshold level of ketones exceed the normal level in the blood. Normal In Urine Ketone bodies are negative. Small amount = < 20 mg/dL. Moderate Continue reading >>

Ketones In The Urine

Ketones In The Urine

Ketone bodies (ketones, KET) Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Ketone bodies are metabolic end-products produced in the liver. They are acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Ketone bodies are generally not found in the urine of healthy individuals, although small amounts of ketones are expelled from the body during urination throughout the day. Such concentrations cannot be detected by regular laboratory methods, so it is generally assumed that there are no ketone bodies in the urine of a healthy individual. Ketones are found in the urine in disorders of carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism causing high levels of ketone bodies in the blood (ketonemia). A medical condition in which ketone bodies are present in the urine is called ketonuria. Under normal conditions, the body’s energy supply comes from glucose. Glucose accumulates in the body as glycogen. Above all, it accumulates in the liver. Glycogen forms a kind of energy storage which can be quickly mobilized if needed to compensate for a shortage of glucose. In response to a shortage of glucose, glycogen is converted by enzymes into glucose that gets into the bloodstream. As a result of physical exercise and emotional tension, diseases causing a high body temperature and other factors causing excessive energy expenditure, the stores of glycogen run out and the body starts to use its fat as a source of energy. Ketones are created when the body breaks down fats and then they are expelled during urination. Unlike adults, children have less glycogen stored and the body switches to fat as a source of energy sooner. As a result, their urinalysis shows ketonuria. High levels of ketone bodi Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

A ketone test can warn you of a serious diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. An elevated level of this substance in your blood can mean you have very high blood sugar. Too many ketones can trigger DKA, which is a medical emergency. Regular tests you take at home can spot when your ketone levels run too high. Then you can take insulin to lower your blood sugar level or get other treatments to prevent complications. What Exactly Are Ketones? Everyone has them, whether you have diabetes or not. Ketones are chemicals made in your liver. You produce them when you don't have enough of the hormone insulin in your body to turn sugar (or “glucose”) into energy. You need another source, so your body uses fat instead. Your liver turns this fat into ketones, a type of acid, and sends them into your bloodstream. Your muscles and other tissues can then use them for fuel. For a person without diabetes, this process doesn’t become an issue. But when you have diabetes, things can run out of control and you build up too many ketones in your blood. If the level goes too high, it can become life-threatening. Who Needs a Ketone Test? You might need one if you have type 1 diabetes. In this type, your immune system attacks and destroys cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Without it, your blood sugar rises. People with type 2 diabetes can also get high ketones, but it isn't as common as it is with type 1. Tests can show you when your level gets high so you can treat it before you get sick. When Should You Test? Your doctor will probably tell you to test your ketones when: Your blood sugar is higher than 250 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dl) for two days in a row You're sick or you've been injured You want to exercise and your blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dl Continue reading >>

Getting To Know Ketones

Getting To Know Ketones

People with diabetes, particularly those with Type 1 diabetes, have been at least vaguely aware of the word ketones for a long time. With the recent resurgence of popular interest in low-carbohydrate diets, however, just about everyone seems to be talking about ketones these days. But does anyone really know what ketones are? Are they a danger to your health (as in diabetic ketoacidosis), or a sign that you have lowered your carbohydrate intake enough to cause weight loss (as some people who follow low-carbohydrate diets believe)? What are ketones? Ketones are end-products of fat metabolism in the body. That is, they are formed when fat is burned for energy by the muscles. Chemically, they are acids known as ketone bodies, and there are three types: beta-hydroxybutyric acid, aceto-acetic acid, and acetone. But you don’t have to be a chemist to understand what role they play in the body. To get to know ketones, it’s helpful to understand how your body burns fuel. A simple analogy is that of an automobile. For a car engine to run, the engine must burn fuel (gasoline), and when the fuel is burned, exhaust (carbon monoxide) is created. The carbon monoxide is the end-product of gasoline combustion. Your body also has an engine that must burn fuel to operate. The engine is muscle, and the fuel is fat, carbohydrate (glucose), and, in certain conditions, protein. When fat is burned, the “exhaust” is ketones, and when glucose is burned, the “exhaust” is lactic acid. Fat is more desirable as a fuel than glucose because there are more calories in a gram of fat (9 calories per gram) than there are in a gram of glucose (4 calories per gram), so you get more energy per gram of fat burned. In a sense, you could call fat a high-test fuel. But there is one catch to burning f Continue reading >>

1 Ketones In Urine Summary

1 Ketones In Urine Summary

Ketones in urine, or ketonuria, as the name suggests, is characterized by the presence of ketones or ketone bodies in the urine. Ketones build up in the body when fat cells are burned to produce energy. This can be a dangerous condition if the amount of ketone is very high, particularly in people with diabetes who have high glucose levels. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are metabolized by the body for the generation of energy, which is used for various metabolic and enzymatic processes within the cells. On a priority basis, carbohydrates are always metabolized for the production of energy. This is then followed by the metabolization of fats and proteins. However, in some instances when the body starts generating high proportions of energy by metabolizing fats or fatty acids, a waste product of this activity accumulates in the body, which is called ketone bodies. This is usually associated with a lack of sugar or carbohydrates in the diet. These ketones are known to be eliminated through the kidneys. Hence, doctors usually perform urine tests to identify the presence of excessive ketones in the body. The concentration of ketone bodies in the urine under normal conditions is less than 20mg/dl. However, if this value rises to abnormal levels, it could be indicative of a condition known as ketoacidosis. Some of the common symptoms of ketonuria are: Thirst: The body loses excess fluid during the increased excretion of ketones. This leads to increased thirst. Frequent urination: The body tries to excrete accumulated ketones, which are associated with an increased urge to urinate. Nausea or vomiting: As the body tries to get rid of excess amounts of ketones through urine, it increases the excretion of salts like sodium and potassium. Low levels of sodium and potassium may l Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Abstract Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and used peripherally as an energy source when glucose is not readily available. The two main ketone bodies are acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-beta-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), while acetone is the third, and least abundant, ketone body. Ketones are always present in the blood and their levels increase during fasting and prolonged exercise. They are also found in the blood of neonates and pregnant women. Diabetes is the most common pathological cause of elevated blood ketones. In diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), high levels of ketones are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counterregulatory hormones. In acute DKA, the ketone body ratio (3HB:AcAc) rises from normal (1:1) to as high as 10:1. In response to insulin therapy, 3HB levels commonly decrease long before AcAc levels. The frequently employed nitroprusside test only detects AcAc in blood and urine. This test is inconvenient, does not assess the best indicator of ketone body levels (3HB), provides only a semiquantitative assessment of ketone levels and is associated with false-positive results. Recently, inexpensive quantitative tests of 3HB levels have become available for use with small blood samples (5-25 microl). These tests offer new options for monitoring and treating diabetes and other states characterized by the abnormal metabolism of ketone bodies. Continue reading >>

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine Test Types: Ph, Ketones, Proteins, And Cells

Urine as a Diagnostic Tool A long time ago, disgusting as it may be, people used to actually taste and drink urine in order to try and diagnose a patient's disease! I'm not even kidding you. Thankfully, modern-day doctors do not have to resort to such disgusting and even dangerous methods. One of the reasons the doctor barbers of yesteryear used to drink their patient's urine was to see if it had a sweet taste, often indicative of diabetes mellitus. Finding the sweet-tasting glucose in the urine was covered in detail in another lesson, so we'll focus on other important measurements here instead. Interpreting Urine pH One value that can be measured in the urine is known as urine pH. pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a substance. If the pH is low, then it is acidic. If the pH is high, then it is basic, or alkaline. To remember which is which, I'll give you a little trick that has worked for me. If you grew up watching cartoons, you probably saw some comical ones where cartoonish robbers poured acid on the roof of a bank vault and waited while the acid ate its way downward into the vault, so the robbers could get down there to steal all the cash. If you can recall that acid likes to eat its way downward into things, then you'll remember that acidic substances go down the pH scale. That is to say, their pH numbers are lower than basic substances. Normal urine pH is roughly 4.6-8, with an average of 6. Urine pH can increase, meaning it will become more basic, or alkaline, due to: A urinary tract infection Kidney failure The administration of certain drugs such as sodium bicarbonate Vegetarian diets On the flip side, causes for a decreased, or acidic, urine pH, include: Metabolic or respiratory acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis, a complication of diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

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