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Ketogenic Substances

Substance

Substance

(redirected from ketogenic substance) Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia. Substance Essence; the material or necessary component of something. A matter of substance, as distinguished from a matter of form, with respect to pleadings, affidavits, indictments, and other legal instruments, entails the essential sufficiency, validity, or merits of the instrument, as opposed to its method or style. substance (Essential nature), noun actuality, basis, body, content, core, drift, essence, essential part, force, gist, heart, hypostasis, idea, import, marrow, material, meaning, pith, principle, purport, reality, res, sense, significance, signification, soul, sum, tenor, vital part substance (Material possessions), noun assets, command of money, corpus, estate, fortune, income, means, money, ownership, property, resources, revenue, riches, treasure, wealth, wherewithalSee also: amount, article, body, bulk, capsule, center, composition, connotation, consequence, construction, content, contents, contour, cornerstone, corpus, element, essence, gist, gravamen, import, importance, main point, materiality, meaning, money, object, point, possessions, property, purpose, quantity, reality, shape, significance, signification, spirit, structure, sum, value SUBSTANCE, evidence. That which is essential; it is used in opposition to form. 2. It is a general rule, that on any issue it is sufficient to prove the substance of the issue. For example, in a case where the defendant pleaded payment of the principal sum and all interest due, and it appeared in evidence that a gross sum was paid, not amounting to the full interest, but accepted by the plaintiff as full payment, the proof was held to be sufficient. 2 Str. 690; 1 Phil. Ev. 161. Continue reading >>

Fat Mobilizing And Ketogenic Substances In Urine

Fat Mobilizing And Ketogenic Substances In Urine

Abstract A potent fat metabolizing and ketogenic factor appears in the urine of individuals maintained on a fasting regimen or low calorie diet high in fat. The pituitary gland seems necessary for its production. Articles related to the one you are viewing The articles below have been selected for you based on the article you are currently viewing. Continue reading >>

Worldwide Use Of The Ketogenic Diet.

Worldwide Use Of The Ketogenic Diet.

Abstract PURPOSE: Over the past decade, the use of the ketogenic diet internationally has increased dramatically. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the use of the diet worldwide. METHODS: With the use of the Internet, e-mail requests for information about international ketogenic diet centers (outside the United States) were made over a 9-month period. Assistance also was obtained from the Child Neurology Society and International League Against Epilepsy. Questions included patient enrollment (total and annually), year the diet was first offered, unique cultural and religious issues in the country, community opinion, and research interests. RESULTS: Successful communication was made with 73 academic centers in 41 countries outside the United States. Sixteen (39%) countries provided information from multiple centers. The median duration offering the diet was 8 years (range, 1-45 years). The average number of patients enrolled to date was 71.6 per country, with 5.4 new patients annually. Common difficulties included avoiding rice intake, tolerating higher fat-to-protein and carbohydrate ratios (e.g., 4:1), finding specific nutritional labels on foods, and handling the growing interest from large populations with limited resources. Nevertheless, cultural and religious issues were generally not limiting; physician and patient acceptance of the diet as an option is high; and most meals were similar among countries. Centers often had great pride in their programs, and international collaborative groups are forming rapidly. A website is now available with updated center information at CONCLUSIONS: Despite occasional difficulties, the ketogenic diet is being used worldwide. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet (keto Diet): Pros And Cons Of Following This Diet

Ketogenic Diet (keto Diet): Pros And Cons Of Following This Diet

Fad diets have now become a trend, thanks to their quick weight loss theories that have made them popular. One of the most talked about fad diets is thd Ketogenic diet which focuses on a high fat, low carb and moderate protein intake that puts your body in a state of ketosis. Basically, when your diet is lacking in carbs but is high in fat, your liver creates ketones that are substances made when the body breaks down fat for energy. This process of ketosis then metabolizes fat to provide energy, which means that you are burning fat, as opposed to carbs; resulting in some amount of weight loss as your body is in the fat burning process. Ketogenic diet may be the newest diet trend doing rounds, but it has its own impact on a person following the diet- be it good or bad. Here are some pros and cons of following the Keto diet that you must know about. Potential Advantages of the Keto Diet 1. Blood sugar balance According to an animal based study, ketogenic diet may help boost cognitive performance for animals; however, more studies are being done in order to get a clearer outcome. 2. Supports gut health Many who suffer from digestive issues may have an added advantage by following the keto diet. Increased fat intake can sometimes boost bowel movement. 3. Healthy response to inflammation Ketosis may actually help in reducing inflammation in the body and make the process smoother and further helps in soothing discomfort. 4. Stabilizes energy levels Fats are a readily available source of energy; so once someone is fat-adapted and in ketosis, they can stay full for longer and still have pumped up energy levels. Potential Disadvantages of the Keto Diet The transition from a normal to a keto diet may not be as smooth as expected and may result in unsettling side effects. When you Continue reading >>

Keto Os- Better Fuel, Better You

Keto Os- Better Fuel, Better You

What are ketones and What is ketosis? When we think of the body’s natural fuel source, we think of glucose, or sugar. We know that our body needs to use sugar as a fuel, but what many people don’t realize is that fats can be an equally, and even superior, fuel source to the body. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. When the body burns fat, it produces three bi-products of fat breakdown, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), acetoacetate (ACA) and acetone. These bi-products are called Ketones. This is a naturally occurring process and it’s what allows our bodies to survive during times of food restriction. When an individual begins to follow a low carbohydrate diet, the body has to look for another fuel source, and it turns to fatty acids and fat stores to provide that much needed energy. The liver breaks down the fat, and releases ketones into the blood to be used by the brain and other organs to produce energy. The interesting thing about ketones is that BHB may be a more efficient source of fuel for the brain than glucose, and because ketones are water-soluble substances, any excesses are eliminated through the urine (BHB and ACA), or the breathe (acetone). What are the benefits? The ketogenic diet first became popular as a treatment for seizures in children suffering from epilepsy, and the neuro-protective benefits of ketones came to light. As research into the process of ketosis expands, the list of benefits just continues to grow. Weight loss & Blood Sugar Balance This is one of the more popular, and desired benefits from ketones. Ketones have been found to improve insulin sensitivity, lower and normalize blood sugar levels, contribute to an increased state of satiety, and decrease food cravings Continue reading >>

Is The High-fat, Low-carb Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

Is The High-fat, Low-carb Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

In the past several years, as measured by Google Trends, interest in an unusual style of eating called the ketogenic diet has tripled, and chances are you have a friend or coworker who’s tried it. Early adopters are typically people who run or ride a lot and want a food plan that doesn’t just fill their tanks but also boosts performance. Followers scarf eggs, cheese, and olive oil in hunger-killing quantities, turning their backs on just about every carb other than vegetables. They don’t use half-and-half in their coffee—they use heavy cream. Still, they’re likely to look a little lean, since the ketogenic diet turns them into 24/7 fat burners. (Even while surfing the couch.) And don’t be surprised if they report feeling better and stronger than ever. Ketones are a type of organic substance that includes ketone bodies, a collective name for the three molecules that are produced naturally by the liver when it breaks down fat for energy, a process that the ketogenic diet jump-starts. Under normal circumstances—that is, if you’re eating a standard, balanced diet—your body gets most of its energy by turning carbohydrates into glucose, which cells then convert to energy. If you significantly reduce carb intake (typically to less than 50 grams per day), your body undergoes a fundamental change: it starts relying on fat-generated ketone bodies as its primary energy source. The brain, heart, and muscles can all burn ketone bodies efficiently if you’ve been eating this way for a month or so. This metabolic state is called ketosis. Historically used as a driver of weight loss, carb restriction has recently gained favor in ultra-endurance circles and the military’s Special Forces. The idea is to radically crank up fat burning so that athletes and soldiers are Continue reading >>

Special Diets For Epilepsy

Special Diets For Epilepsy

Treatment Overview When the body burns (metabolizes) fat, it creates substances called ketones. The ketogenic diet tries to force the body to use more fat for energy instead of sugar (glucose) by increasing fat and restricting carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet can be used to prevent seizures in an adult or a child who has any type of epilepsy. It is not yet clear how or why the ketogenic diet prevents or reduces seizures. One version of the ketogenic diet provides 4 grams of fat for every 1 gram of protein and carbohydrate together. People on a ketogenic diet have to eat mostly fatty foods, such as butter, cream, and peanut butter. Foods such as bread, pasta, fruits, and vegetables have to be severely limited. And the person's total calories are also restricted. At every meal, the food has to be measured carefully so that the right amounts of each food are given. Even a slight departure from the diet can cancel its effect. If you are thinking about the ketogenic diet, keep in mind: For the diet to prevent seizures, your child has to follow it exactly. The amounts and types of foods eaten have to be measured precisely. And preparing meals can take a lot of time. The diet does not work for some children, no matter how closely they follow it. The ketogenic diet is very strict and can be hard for some people and families to follow. Other special diets for epilepsy that are less strict may also be tried. The medium chain triglyceride (MCT) diet. People on this diet take an oil supplement instead of relying on food for the fat in the diet. This can make the diet easier, because less total fat is needed from food and the person can eat more protein and carbohydrates. The modified Atkins diet. The Atkins diet is known as a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The modified Atkin Continue reading >>

Special Diets For Epilepsy

Special Diets For Epilepsy

When the body burns (metabolizes) fat, it creates substances called ketones. The ketogenic diet tries to force the body to use more fat for energy instead of sugar (glucose) by increasing fat and restricting carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet can be used to prevent seizures in an adult or a child who has any type of epilepsy. It is not yet clear how or why the ketogenic diet prevents or reduces seizures. One version of the ketogenic diet provides 4 grams of fat for every 1 gram of protein and carbohydrate together. People on a ketogenic diet have to eat mostly fatty foods, such as butter, cream, and peanut butter. Foods such as bread, pasta, fruits, and vegetables have to be severely limited. And the person's total calories are also restricted. At every meal, the food has to be measured carefully so that the right amounts of each food are given. Even a slight departure from the diet can cancel its effect. The ketogenic diet is very strict and can be hard for some people and families to follow. Other special diets for epilepsy that are less strict may also be tried. A person usually has to fast the day and night before starting the diet. The diet is gradually introduced over several days, so that the body can get used to the dramatic change. The person may feel tired and lack energy during the first few days. Children are usually admitted to a hospital or epilepsy center when they start the diet. There, the child can be watched and parents and caregivers can get training on how to do the diet at home. The ketogenic diet should always be given under the supervision of a doctor and a dietitian. When it works, the ketogenic diet works quickly to reduce seizures. People usually start having fewer seizures in 2 to 3 weeks. In 2 to 3 months you will be able to tell how well it Continue reading >>

Keto For Cancer

Keto For Cancer

The Rationale for Using ketogenic Diets as an ADJUNCTIVE (add-on) cancer treatment Introduction Ketogenic diets (KD) are very low-carbohydrate, adequate protein, high-fat diets that cause the body to use fat as a primary fuel. There are many different ways to do the diet but each type of KD has the common goals of 1) lowering blood glucose (i.e., blood sugar), 2) lowering insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels (the chemicals in our bodies that let our cells use blood sugar for energy) and 3) raising ketone bodies (i.e., biochemicals our livers produce from fat that our cells can use for energy in place of blood sugar). By altering the levels of these three substances in the blood, KDs can potentially suppress growth in many types of tumors. Ketogenic diets have been used for almost 100 years to treat epilepsy. Thus, there is a long history demonstrating that ketogenic diets are safe and feasible. However, they are therapeutic diets that must be followed by professional monitoring. And although, there is a strong and growing body of research that suggests that KDs can suppress tumor growth, especially alongside conventional treatment like chemotherapy and radiation, there is no evidence that KDs can be used in place of standard of care. How It Potentially Works The tumor-suppressive effect of KDs is thought to occur through one or more of the following mechanisms: Scientists have known for almost 90 years that most solid cancers use blood sugar (glucose) as their primary source of energy (Vander Heiden 2009; Seyfried 2014). The German scientist Otto Warburg discovered that tumor cells consume glucose at a much higher rate than normal healthy cells. This has come to be known as the Warburg effect (Seyfried 2012). The KD decreases available glucose to tumo Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About The Keto Diet

Everything You Should Know About The Keto Diet

The trending keto diet forces you to put that fat-is-bad mentality to rest once and for all. But can you take a ketogenic diet too far? By now, you know fat isn't as bad as everyone once thought. But we're guessing you still think twice before cooking with butter and indulging in a little cheese. Sound about right? Then the ketogenic diet will blow your mind. Simply called "keto" by its army of devoted followers, the plan revolves around eating lots of fats and not a lot of carbs. It's closely related to the Atkins diet but differs in that it limits your protein intake and calls for sticking to very low amounts of carbs the whole time you're on the diet, versus just during the introductory phase. What is the ketogenic diet? Following a traditional Western diet means the body sources its fuel from glucose found in carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach. "You're taking carbohydrates out of the equation, and the body kind of pauses and says, 'Okay, I don't have any sugar. What am I supposed to run off of?'" says Pamela Nisevich Bede, R.D., a dietitian with EAS Sports Nutrition. The answer? Fat. Or, more specifically, ketone bodies, which are substances the body produces when it sources energy from fat rather than glucose. The keto diet is high in fat, low in carbs, and includes only a moderate amount of protein (because the body ends up converting excess protein to carbohydrates, Bede says). When we say high in fat, we mean it. The diet calls for sourcing 75 percent of your calories from fat, with 20 percent from protein, and 5 percent from carbohydrates. Exactly how many grams you should get depends on your energy needs (online calculators can help you figure it out), but most people will want to take in no more than 50 grams of carbs, Bede Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Substance

Ketogenic Substance

Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia. Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster's page for free fun content. Link to this page: ketogenic substance Feedback Facebook Share Twitter Google+ CITE Continue reading >>

Can You Cheat On Your Ketogenic Diet By Taking Keto Supplements?

Can You Cheat On Your Ketogenic Diet By Taking Keto Supplements?

A ketogenic diet is a strict low-carb eating plan that forces the body to burn fats for energy instead of carbohydrates. When carbs are restricted, the body moves into a state of ketosis, a metabolic state that produces ketones by breaking down fats in the liver, which are then used for diet. Is it Possible to Cheat On the Ketogenic Diet? In a regular moderate to high-carb diet, carbs are converted to glucose in the bloodstream. Glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert into energy so it will be used before any other energy source. When the glucose is used for energy, the fats consumed are not needed by the body and are stored, resulting in excess weight. The effectiveness of the diet depends on your carb intake. Normally an intake of between 20-30g of net carbs per day is recommended and reducing this intake to less than 15g will give faster results. As the carb intake of a “normal” diet can range between 150-400g of carbs per day, reducing them to the level required to get into the state can be quite challenging. Because of this, some people may be tempted to have a cheat day on keto. The good thing is that, there are many ways that you can do cheats days or meals without breaking your ketosis state which a lot of people who have been on the diet for years can attest to. So, yes, there are are many ways to do it which we will get into in just a little bit. Keto Supplements That Help You Stay in Ketosis ​There are various supplements available designed to benefit those on trying the keto diet. Some supplements also aim to induce a state of ketosis in the body, even if the blood glucose level is too high to be achieved naturally. These products or supplements can also help you stay in ketosis even if you decide to take a cheat day on keto: MCT (Mediu Continue reading >>

Ketosis Fundamentals

Ketosis Fundamentals

What is ketosis? Ketosis is the physiological state where the concentration of ketone bodies in the blood is higher than normal. This is generally agreed to be at beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations greater than 0.5 mM. How to achieve ketosis? Ketosis occurs either as a result of increased fat oxidation, whilst fasting or following a strict ketosis diet plan (ENDOGENOUS ketosis), or after consuming a ketone supplement (EXOGENOUS ketosis). When in a state of ketosis the body can use ketones to provide a fuel for cellular respiration instead of its usual substrates: carbohydrate, fat or protein. Why does ketosis exist? Normally, the body breaks down carbohydrates, fat, and (sometimes) proteins to provide energy. When carbohydrate is consumed in the diet, some is used immediately to maintain blood glucose levels, and the rest is stored. The hormone that signals to cells to store carbohydrate is insulin. The liver stores carbohydrate as glycogen, this is broken down and released between meals to keep blood glucose levels constant. Muscles also store glycogen, when broken down this provides fuel for exercise. Most cells in the body can switch readily between using carbohydrates and fat as fuel. Fuel used depends on substrate availability, on the energy demands of the cell and other neural and hormonal signals. The brain is different as it is dependent on carbohydrates as a fuel source. This is because fats cannot easily cross the blood-brain barrier. The inability to make use of energy within fat poses a problem during periods where there is limited carbohydrate in the diet. If blood glucose levels fall to low, brain function declines. Relatively little energy is stored as carbohydrate (2,000 kCal) compared to fat (150,000 kCal). The body's store of carbohydrates runs Continue reading >>

Special Diets For Epilepsy

Special Diets For Epilepsy

Treatment Overview When the body burns (metabolizes) fat, it creates substances called ketones. The ketogenic diet tries to force the body to use more fat for energy instead of sugar (glucose) by increasing fat and restricting carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet can be used to prevent seizures in an adult or a child who has any type of epilepsy. It is not yet clear how or why the ketogenic diet prevents or reduces seizures. One version of the ketogenic diet provides 4 grams of fat for every 1 gram of protein and carbohydrate together. People on a ketogenic diet have to eat mostly fatty foods, such as butter, cream, and peanut butter. Foods such as bread, pasta, fruits, and vegetables have to be severely limited. And the person's total calories are also restricted. At every meal, the food has to be measured carefully so that the right amounts of each food are given. Even a slight departure from the diet can cancel its effect. If you are thinking about the ketogenic diet, keep in mind: For the diet to prevent seizures, your child has to follow it exactly. The amounts and types of foods eaten have to be measured precisely. And preparing meals can take a lot of time. The diet does not work for some children, no matter how closely they follow it. The ketogenic diet is very strict and can be hard for some people and families to follow. Other special diets for epilepsy that are less strict may also be tried. The medium chain triglyceride (MCT) diet. People on this diet take an oil supplement instead of relying on food for the fat in the diet. This can make the diet easier, because less total fat is needed from food and the person can eat more protein and carbohydrates. The modified Atkins diet. The Atkins diet is known as a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The modified Atkin Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

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