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Ketogenic Defined

What Is Ketosis? Hint: It Can Help You Burn Fat & Suppress Your Appetite

What Is Ketosis? Hint: It Can Help You Burn Fat & Suppress Your Appetite

We’ve longed been told that calorie restriction, increasing exercise and reducing dietary fat intake are the keys to weight loss. But, if you’ve ever attempted to control your weight by subsisting on fewer calories — especially from mostly bland “diet foods”— you’re already probably aware that this typically produces minimal results and is extremely hard to stick with long-term or consistently. Considering the high rates of obesity now facing most developed nations — along with an increased risk for health conditions like diabetes or heart problems as a result — researchers have been anxiously working on how to suppress appetite and achieve weight loss in a healthy, sustainable manner. The keto diet has emerged over the past several decades as one potential answer to this large-scale weight loss problem. (1) While there are some differences in opinion, depending on who you ask, regarding the best approach to very low-carb dieting, studies consistently show that the ketogenic diet (also called the keto diet) produces not only substantial weight loss for a high percentage of people who adhere to it, but also other important health benefits such as reductions in seizures, markers of diabetes and more. The keto diet revolves around eating foods that are high in natural fats, consuming only moderate protein and severely restricting the number of carbs eaten each day. Even if you don’t have much weight to lose, entering into a state of ketosis can be helpful for other reasons — such as for improved energy levels, mental capabilities and mood stabilization. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is the result of following the ketogenic diet, which is why it’s also sometimes called “the ketosis diet.” Ketosis takes place when glucose from carbohydrate foods (like Continue reading >>

Paleo, Low Carb And Keto - Which Is Best?

Paleo, Low Carb And Keto - Which Is Best?

Filed under: athletes, athletic performance, carbohydrates, carbs, ketogenic, leaky gut, lifestyle, lifestyle advice, low carb, Paleo, research, tips Share Tweet Pin it Fancy Add Carbohydrates are a hot topic in the Paleo world. Although not strictly defined as such, the relatively low-carbohydrate nature of the Paleo diet provides a plethora of health benefits. The question of how many carbohydrates your Paleo diet should include for optimal health is often raised. The answer depends on many things including your gender, health status, stress level, activity level and your goals. Some find greater benefits from going very low-carb in order to create and maintain a state of ketosis. Ketosis can occur as a transient adaptation to a low-carb Paleo diet but to stay in this state for any length of time, both carbohydrates and protein need to be tightly controlled. So What Exactly is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic diet is by definition a low-carb, moderate protein; high fat diet that often needs to be very low carb to achieve its purpose of burning fat for energy through the creation of ketones. Protein intake is moderate in order to prevent gluconeogenesis, the process of turning non-carbohydrate substrate such as amino acids into glucose. When these conditions are met, fat rather than glucose becomes the preferred energy source and ketones are formed as a by-product. Stored fat, dietary fat and ketones are all used in this metabolic system for energy production. Paleolithic people depended on ketosis for survival in times of food scarcity. Conversely, modern humans have harnessed it for weight reduction in an era of food over-abundance. The carbohydrate threshold for ketosis varies between individuals however for most people; reducing carbohydrate consumption to below 50 Continue reading >>

Ketosis And The Ketogenic Ratio – Q&a

Ketosis And The Ketogenic Ratio – Q&a

Question: Do you still believe in the ketogenic ratio for getting into ketosis? I am having trouble showing ketones. Any tips? Sorry to bother you again but can drinking 2 gal of water per day dilute your urine so you don’t show ketones? Answer: Ok, let me take these on one at a time. In my first book The Ketogenic Diet, I talked about something called the ketogenic ratio (KR) which is an equation/concept used in the planning of ketogenic diets for epilepsy patients. The equation basically gives you the potential ketone producing potential of a given meal depending on the relative ketogenic or anti-ketogenic effect of the different macronutrients. So the KR of a given combination of nutrients can be estimated with the following equation: Protein turns out to be partially ketogenic (46%) and partially anti-ketogenic (58%), reflecting the fact that some amino acids can be made into ketones, while other are made into glucose). Carbohydrate is 100% anti-ketogenic and fat is mostly (90%) ketogenic (the 10% anti-ketogenic is due to the fact that the glycerol portion of triglycerides, explained in A Primer on Dietary Fats, can be converted to glucose in the liver). Quoting from that section of The Ketogenic Diet: This equation represents the relative tendency for a given macronutrient to either promote or prevent a ketogenic state (1). Recalling from the previous chapter that insulin and glucagon are the ultimate determinants of the shift to a ketotic state, this equation essentially represents the tendency for a given nutrient to raise insulin (anti-ketogenic) or glucagon (pro-ketogenic). For the treatment of epilepsy, the ratio of K to AK must be at least 1.5 for a meal to be considered ketogenic (1). Typically, this results in a diet containing 4 grams of fat for each gra Continue reading >>

What Are Macros

What Are Macros

What Are Macros? Macronutrients are molecules that our bodies use to create energy for themselves – primarily fat, protein and carbs. They are found in all foods in varying amounts, measured in grams (g) on the nutrition labels. Fat provides 9 calories per gram Protein provides 4 calories per gram Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram Counting Calories vs. Counting Macros If you eat less calories than you burn, you will likely lose weight. But counting calories can only tell you so much; if you’re not careful and don’t eat the right calories, you’ll likely lose muscle too! To maintain, lose or even gain weight, many people rely on counting macros to make sure they’re eating correctly. 100 calories of avocado (fat) is a lot better than 100 calories of a doughnut (carbs). On a ketogenic (low carb, high fat) diet, it’s very important to know how many carbs you’re eating in comparison to fat and protein. Many people aim for less than 50g of carbs to maintain ketosis. When counting macros, you simply add up how many grams of fat, protein and carbs you ate that day. Let’s take an example: If you ate 10 Ritz crackers and wanted to calculate your macros for that meal, you would first determine how many servings you ate. If the serving size is 5 crackers and you ate 10, you would multiply every number on that label by 2. You would have eaten 8g of fat, 20g of carbs, and 2g of protein in that snack. In your log, you would then add all your grams of carbs, protein and fat up to a total so far. By seeing your macros visually, you can easily tell when you’re running a little high in carbs and know when to slow down. How to Calculate Your Optimal Macros Your optimal macronutrient intake depends on many different factors- your age, gender, weight, BMI and activit Continue reading >>

Table Of Contents

Table Of Contents

Definition Origins Description Function Benefits Precautions Risks Resources Ketogenic diets are a group of high-fat, moderate-protein, and very low-carbohydrate diets given to treat some children and adolescents with epilepsy, and some adults with epilepsy and other diseases. The name ketogenic refers to the increased production of ketone bodies as a result of this special diet. Ketone bodies are three compounds that are formed during the metabolism of fats and are ordinarily excreted in the urine. An abnormally high level of ketone bodies is called keto-sis, and this condition is the goal of the ketogenic diet. It is thought that ketosis helps to control the frequency and severity of epileptic seizures, even though the reasons for this effect are not fully understood as of 2007. It has been known since Biblical times that some people with epilepsy were helped by prolonged periods of fasting, with good results. In earlier periods of history, children were kept on clear liquids for as long as two or three weeks until their seizures improved. This type of fasting, however, was obviously not sustainable as a long-term treatment. In 1921, a doctor at the MayoClinic named R. M. Wilder devised a diet for patients with epilepsy that was intended to mimic the biochemical changes that take place during fasting—ketosis, acidosis, and dehydration. Dr. Wilder’s ketogenic diet provided 10–15 grams of carbohydrates per day, 1 gram of protein for each kilogram of the patient’s body weight, and the remaining calories from fat. The calorie level was 75% of the normal daily allowance for the patient’s weight, and fluids were restricted to 80 percent. Wilder’s diet was almost identical to the protocol used at Johns Hopkins in 2007. Until the late 1930s, the Mayo Clinic ketoge Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

Very-low-carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet V Low-fat Diet For Long-term Weight Loss: A Meta-analysis Of Randomised Controlled Trials

Very-low-carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet V Low-fat Diet For Long-term Weight Loss: A Meta-analysis Of Randomised Controlled Trials

NB Bueno, IS de Melo, SL de Oliveira, and T da Rocha Ataide. Review published: 2013. This review concluded that individuals assigned to a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet achieved greater long-term reductions in body weight and certain blood cardiovascular risk factors than those assigned to a low fat diet. The conclusions of this well-conducted systematic review are likely to be reliable but the magnitude of the results were of little clinical significance. Authors' objectives To compare a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet with a low fat diet in overweight and obese individuals, in terms of long-term weight loss. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science Direct, Scopus, LILACS, SciELO, ClinicalTrials.gov, OpenGrey.eu, DissOnline.de, NYAM.org and Clinical Evidence were searched to August 2012 with no date or language restrictions. The authors stated that the search strategy was available online. Study selection Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet with a low fat diet in overweight and obese adults (older than 18 years with a mean body mass index greater than 27.5 kg/m²) and had a minimum follow-up of 12 months were eligible for inclusion. Studies of populations with other risk factors in addition to high body mass index were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome of interest was body weight. Secondary outcomes were triacylglycerol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c and C-reactive protein levels. A very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was defined as a diet with no more than 50g of carbohydrates per day or 10% of daily energy from carbohydrates. A Continue reading >>

New Study Favors Fat Over Carbs

New Study Favors Fat Over Carbs

Here you will find an index of the latest scientific studies on the ketogenic diet which support the therapeutic benefits of ketogenic diets, their safety long term and efficacy in treating obesity, diabetes type 2, epilepsy, lowering cholesterol and heart disease prevention among others. "High carbohydrate intake is associated with a higher risk of mortality, and high fat intake with a lower risk, researchers report. An international team of scientists studied diet and mortality in 135,335 people between 35 and 70 years old in 18 countries, following them for an average of more than seven years. Diet information depended on self-reports, and the scientists controlled for factors including age, sex, smoking, physical activity and body mass index. The study is in The Lancet. Compared with people who ate the lowest 20 percent of carbohydrates, those who ate the highest 20 percent had a 28 percent increased risk of dying earlier. But high carbohydrate intake was not associated with cardiovascular death. People with the highest 20 percent in total fat intake — an average of 35.3 percent of calories from fat — had about a 23 percent reduced risk of death compared with the lowest 20 percent (an average of 10.6 percent of calories from fat). Consuming higher saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat and monounsaturated fat were all associated with lower mortality. Higher fat diets were also associated with a lower risk of stroke." But the latest research, presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress, in Barcelona found those with low intake of saturated fat raised chances of early death by 13 per cent compared to those eating plenty. And consuming high levels of all fats cut mortality by up to 23 per cent. The Canadian study tracked eating patterns and death rates acr Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

A Guide To Ketosis

A Guide To Ketosis

Here is the guide to ketosis. The contents of this article can be located here. If you're currently wondering what on earth ketosis even is, then you're in luck for I plan not only to befuddle but also to enlighten. All you have to do is read on. I've personally had fantastic results on keto, and I really believe in the validity of this diet - not only in terms of fat-loss, but also in terms of health-gain. There is a lot of understandable skepticism and tons of misconceptions about keto; I want to let newcomers know, however surprising it may be, that keto (or at least a diet low in grains/sugars and high in fats) is a very healthy diet with numerous benefits. This guide is very long so I've partitioned this post into subsections. The links contained within the contents are 'clickable' and will transport you directly to that section. You can also right click and select "copy link address" of a particular section/section title, and you can either bookmark it so that you can return to a specific section easily or you can give the link to a friend if you want them to read a particular section. If you want to return to the contents of the page simply click on the 'upwards' arrows that are next to each of the section titles within the main article. Contents I. Why You Should Care About Ketosis: The Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet 1A. Ketosis Increases Neuronal Stabilization and Mental Focus 1B. Ketosis Promotes the Loss of Body-Fat and LDL Cholesterol 1C. Ketosis Eliminates Various Ailments such as Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension 1D. Ketosis Treats Several Diseases such as Alzheimer's and Various Cancers 1E. Ketosis Promotes Cardiovascular Health 1F. Ketosis Preserves Lean-Body Mass 1G. One Will Lose Body-fat More Quickly on Keto Than Not 1H. Ketosis Blunts Appetite and Incre Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Simplified: What It Does Not Mean (ketogenic Vs Low Carb Explained)

Keto Diet Simplified: What It Does Not Mean (ketogenic Vs Low Carb Explained)

Keto vs Low Carb: What’s The Difference? There seem to be A LOT of misunderstandings of how “keto” is defined, causing serious arguments and unnecessary negativity in low carb communities… Ketogenic Diet Simplified – Low Carb Q&A Need Help… and a SERIOUS dose of Weight Loss Motivation? Watch the Low Carb Classes this week! Like I mentioned in the video above, every time I eat the sausage & fried eggs from McDonald’s it causes a bit of a stir. Like this comment I got on Instagram recently, for example: Eggs are .4 or half a carb each (all eggs). The sausage at McDonald’s is processed meat – just like all sausage, even what you buy at the grocery store. The sausage patties at McDonald’s are 1 carb each. You can see all of this on their website, of course. People give me slack for eating the McDonald’s sausage, saying “that’s not keto” just because it’s from McDonald’s, or because of the ingredients. My favorite sausage I buy at the grocery store is Tennessee Pride brand. Two of the ingredients include sugar and monosodium glutamate. Nobody ever says a word about the sausage and eggs I make at home. Which makes NO sense at all. So just because it’s from McDonald’s doesn’t automatically make it NOT keto. At 1 carb per patty, regardless of the ingredients or your personal preferences – it certainly DOES fit into a ketogenic low carb diet – by the standards of 20 net carbs max, 70% fat minimum. This is my typical response to those types of comments, btw: LOL ♥ Being a public figure, I catch a lot of slack and get tons of negative comments on my low carb food choices. Even though I eat a ketogenic low carb diet, and have had GREAT success with it. So like I said, there’s obviously a lot of confusion about what “keto” IS and wha Continue reading >>

Low Carb And The Ketogenic Diet: What’s The Difference?

Low Carb And The Ketogenic Diet: What’s The Difference?

Often people who claim to follow a ketogenic diet are actually following a low carb diet. This article will help clear up confusion on the differences between low carb and ketogenic diets and discuss the benefits of a well-formulated ketogenic diet as compared to a traditional low carb diet. Low Carb Defined Although the definition varies across the literature, a low-carbohydrate (low carb) diet tends to be classified as a diet containing less than 30% of calories from carbohydrates (1,2). While most low carb diets contain 50-150 grams of carbs per day, some athletes adhering to this type of diet have over 200 grams of carbs due to their higher caloric requirements. The Difference in Ketogenic Diets Unlike the typical “low-carb” diet, a well-formulated ketogenic diet follows a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carb approach, e.g. 75% fat, 20% protein, and 5% carbohydrate. A ketogenic diet typically allows about 20-50 grams of carbohydrates per day (3). This macronutrient profile allows the body to start producing and to eventually utilize an alternative fuel source known as ketones (4). This process is analogous to changing your car’s fuel source to something longer lasting, more readily available, and more sustainable overall. The Main Problem with “Low-Carb” A common mistake with ketogenic dieting is going “low-carb” but still having a high protein and moderate fat intake. As discussed in previous articles, carbohydrate restriction is essential for a ketogenic diet. However, the high-fat, moderate-protein component is equally as important. If protein intake is too high on a low carb, low-calorie diet, your body could increase glucose production through a process known as gluconeogenesis. More research is needed in this area as it relates to ketogenic dieti Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet - Defined

The Ketogenic Diet - Defined

Leave a Reply. Notify me of new comments to this post by email Submit Hello my name is Stephany and I want to share my story. I am a mother of an autistic child. My son is Jovan, and this is his journey. All Alternative Healing & Natural Medicine Autism Autism And Juicing Autism And Sleep Issues Autism And The Dentist Autism And Wireless Autism Healing Protocol AutismOne Conference Books I Recommend BPA Candida Chlorinated Swimming Pools Detox Dr. Marco Ruggiero Electromagnetic Fields Foods We Like Gardening GMO And Roundup Himalayan Salt Intermittent Fasting Jovan's Schedule Ketogenic Diet Kombucha Light Therapy Magnetic Clay Media Appearances Microwave Dangers Natural Solutions For Treating Autism Pediatric Neurology Podcast Soy Testing Labs The Gut Therapy Thermography Water Filters Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

The concept of ketogenic dieting is not new – it has existed in many forms and in many variations. It has many similarities to the Atkin’s Diet, and is cousins with other popular diets like South Beach and Paleo. Below, we’ve outlined exactly what the ketogenic diet is, how and why it works, and how you can get started with a ketogenic diet today. Before we dive in, however, it is important to understand that there are three types of ketogenic diets: the Standard Ketogenic Diet, the Cyclical Ketogenic Diet, and the Targeted Ketogenic Diet. All are very closely related but differ in regards to limits and timing of carbohydrate consumption. For all intents and purposes, when we refer to ketogenic diets on TheKetogenicDiet.org, we are typically referring to the Standard Ketogenic diet unless otherwise noted. Most information here is relevant regardless of what type of ketogenic diet you are practicing, however. Okay…so what is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is quite simply any diet that forces the body into a process called ketosis, whereby fats are burned instead of carbohydrates for use as energy. A proper ketogenic diet calls for the dieter to consume high amounts of fat, adequate amounts of protein, and very low amounts of carbohydrates. Our bodies are used to turning carbohydrates into glucose to send all over the body as energy. When we enter ketosis by sufficiently limiting our carbohydrate intake, our livers start breaking down fat cells into fatty acids and ketones, to be used as energy. Why does the ketogenic diet work? The ketogenic diet works much like any other diet: by limiting the amount of calories you consume, thereby creating a caloric deficit where the body burns more energy than it takes in. That is the fundamental science of weight loss, Continue reading >>

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