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Ketogenic Defined

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Should You Give It A Go?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet And Should You Give It A Go?

Ninety years ago, researchers developed a diet that was an effective method for helping epileptic children. Today, that same diet has become a popular weight-loss diet. That diet is the ketogenic diet, and it was the 5th most Googled diet of 2013. Since that time, its popularity has only increased as the weight loss world talks more and more about the success of high fat, low carb diets. So, what is the ketogenic diet and how is it different from low carb and Paleo diets? Most importantly, does it actually work? Is a Ketogenic Diet Effective for Weight Loss? The general idea of a ketogenic diet is to eat foods that are low in carbs, moderate in protein, and high in quality fats. Doing this helps your body go into nutritional ketosis, which allows you to burn fat and ketones (produced from the breakdown of fat) instead of glucose for energy. The exact reason why this results in weight loss is still being debated, but several studies have now concluded that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss. And more recent studies (like this one) are currently underway, examining the potential health benefits of a ketogenic diet for those with Type 2 diabetes. In the end, as Chris Kelly of Nourish Balance Thrive suggests, the biggest reason why a ketogenic diet is so great for weight loss is most likely easy appetite suppression. Eating low carb and high fat foods means that you’re less likely to have sugar cravings and more likely to get full faster. That means you’ll generally eat less without trying. How is a Ketogenic Diet Different than a Low Carb or Paleo Diet? Honestly, it really depends. For example, let’s say that you eat a diet that contains no dairy, no legumes, and no grains. Let’s also say that your diet ensures that you’re generally in ketosis. In that Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Us Live 10 Years Longer?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Us Live 10 Years Longer?

We’ve all been programmed by the media and academia to believe that eating a high-fat diet is bad. We still have countless jokes scattered throughout pop culture about how someone eating bacon is basically the equivalent of Russian Roulette. However, what if reality were more like Woody Allen’s movie Sleeper. He wakes up in a 21st century where what they thought was health food is now bad for you. Hence, let’s explore the idea of whether eating fat is healthy and whether the ketogenic diet reduces or adds years to your life. What Is a Ketogenic Diet? To understand a ketogenic diet, it’s important to know how the body burns fuel for energy. The body-fuel sources include carbohydrates, protein, and fat. When we consume more carbohydrates, which turn to sugar (glucose or fructose) in the body, than our body can properly metabolize (or burn for energy), the liver will turn the extra sugar into fat and then secrete that fat into the bloodstream in the form of triglycerides. Triglycerides are then stored in our fat cells to be used for energy later. When our diet chronically consists of high-carb, high-sugar foods—the standard American diet today—those triglycerides go unused as more continue to be stored. More importantly, the carbs cause excessive insulin secretion which blocks natural fat burning processes. All of this causes a variety of metabolic-syndrome issues, such as weight gain (particularly with fat accumulation around the midsection), high triglycerides and blood pressure, chronic inflammation, and certain diseases. People in the high-carb, high-sugar boat are likely burning sugar as their primary fuel. This sounds like a good deal, right? Unfortunately, no. If your body’s primary source of energy is carbs and sugar, it’s missing out on its optimal Continue reading >>

Very-low-carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet V Low-fat Diet For Long-term Weight Loss: A Meta-analysis Of Randomised Controlled Trials

Very-low-carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet V Low-fat Diet For Long-term Weight Loss: A Meta-analysis Of Randomised Controlled Trials

NB Bueno, IS de Melo, SL de Oliveira, and T da Rocha Ataide. Review published: 2013. This review concluded that individuals assigned to a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet achieved greater long-term reductions in body weight and certain blood cardiovascular risk factors than those assigned to a low fat diet. The conclusions of this well-conducted systematic review are likely to be reliable but the magnitude of the results were of little clinical significance. Authors' objectives To compare a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet with a low fat diet in overweight and obese individuals, in terms of long-term weight loss. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science Direct, Scopus, LILACS, SciELO, ClinicalTrials.gov, OpenGrey.eu, DissOnline.de, NYAM.org and Clinical Evidence were searched to August 2012 with no date or language restrictions. The authors stated that the search strategy was available online. Study selection Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet with a low fat diet in overweight and obese adults (older than 18 years with a mean body mass index greater than 27.5 kg/m²) and had a minimum follow-up of 12 months were eligible for inclusion. Studies of populations with other risk factors in addition to high body mass index were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome of interest was body weight. Secondary outcomes were triacylglycerol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, HbA1c and C-reactive protein levels. A very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was defined as a diet with no more than 50g of carbohydrates per day or 10% of daily energy from carbohydrates. A Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

In Depth Look At Ketogenic Diets And Ketosis

In Depth Look At Ketogenic Diets And Ketosis

What exactly is Ketosis? The metabolic state of ketosis simply means that the quantity of ketone bodies in the blood have reached higher-than-normal levels. When the body is in a ketogenic state, this means that lipid energy metabolism is intact. The body will start breaking down your own body fat to fuel the body's normal, everyday functions. What's So Great About Being In Ketosis? Establishing this metabolic state of ketosis even for a short period of time has many outstanding benefits. Benefit 1 The main benefit of ketosis is that it increases the body's ability to utilize fats for fuel, which gets very lazy on a high-carbohydrate diet. When on high-carbohydrate diets, the body can usually expect an energy source to keep entering the body. But in the state of ketosis, the body has to become efficient at mobilizing fats as energy. Benefit 2 Ketosis has a protein-sparing effect, assuming that you are consuming adequate quantities of protein and calories—0.7 grams per pound of body weight per day—in the first place.[1] Once in ketosis, the body actually prefers ketones to glucose. Since the body has copious quantities of fat, this means there is no need to oxidize protein to generate glucose through gluconeogenesis. Benefit 3 Another benefit has to do with the low levels of insulin in the body, which causes greater lipolysis and free-glycerol release compared to a normal diet when insulin is around 80-120. Insulin has a lipolysis-blocking effect, which can inhibit the use of fatty acids as energy. Also, when insulin is brought to low levels, beneficial hormones are released in the body, such as growth hormone and other powerful growth factors. Benefit 4 Another small but very important benefit of the ketogenic diet is that when in the state of ketosis, ketones, alon Continue reading >>

Advanced Ketogenic Dieting

Advanced Ketogenic Dieting

There is a lot of confusion out there when it comes to ketogenic dieting. All around us we have hundreds of books, so many experts, endless opinions from people who have done it themselves and posted their views online. Right now the water is exceedingly muddied. The goal of this article it to not only give a clear view on the keto protocols but also lay out an sound tried and true protocol along with a systematic way to set it up. Ketogenic Dieting Defined Lets start this off talking about what ketogenic dieting means and doesn’t mean. A lot of people think that keto means eating low carbs. Some people think it means just eating protein. Ketogenic dieting is achieved by getting into ketosis, and that is a process that the body has to go through. Eating low carbs or only eating protein, etc, doesn’t mean the body will get into ketosis. Generally speaking being keto means that someone has limited their carbohydrate intake to extremely low levels until their body runs out of stored glycogen causing the body to start making ketones (fats) to run on. THAT is what the main goal of a ketogenic diet is- being in ketosis and a state of using fat for fuel. We all have glycogen (carbs) stored in our liver, and when we limit carb consumption our liver kicks out stored glycogen to fuel our activity. When that liver glycogen runs out that is when the body flips the switch and starts making ketones for us to use as energy. Ketones are fractionated fats that yield 7 cals per gram (regular fats yield 9 calories per gram when used for energy). This is very interesting because when we are eating a carb based diet, carbs give us 4 calories per carb eaten to burn for energy. Being in a ketogenic state we are burning 7 calories per ketone….meaning we are burning more energy at rest. I Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet - Defined

The Ketogenic Diet - Defined

Leave a Reply. Notify me of new comments to this post by email Submit Hello my name is Stephany and I want to share my story. I am a mother of an autistic child. My son is Jovan, and this is his journey. All Alternative Healing & Natural Medicine Autism Autism And Juicing Autism And Sleep Issues Autism And The Dentist Autism And Wireless Autism Healing Protocol AutismOne Conference Books I Recommend BPA Candida Chlorinated Swimming Pools Detox Dr. Marco Ruggiero Electromagnetic Fields Foods We Like Gardening GMO And Roundup Himalayan Salt Intermittent Fasting Jovan's Schedule Ketogenic Diet Kombucha Light Therapy Magnetic Clay Media Appearances Microwave Dangers Natural Solutions For Treating Autism Pediatric Neurology Podcast Soy Testing Labs The Gut Therapy Thermography Water Filters Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis? - Definition & Symptoms

What Is Ketosis? - Definition & Symptoms

What is ketosis? It's actually a normal part of your body's metabolic processes, but sometimes things get out of balance, and too many ketones begin building up. Learn how this happens, what the symptoms are, and how it's treated. What is Ketosis? Ketosis is actually a normal part of your body's metabolic processes. Your body derives energy from breaking down the food you eat, and a lot of your initial energy comes from carbohydrates. However, when the body no longer has any carbohydrate stores to draw upon, it will begin burning fat for energy. This results in a buildup of ketones. So if, for example, you are on an extremely low-carb diet, your body will switch to make energy through the process of ketosis. Ketosis can also be triggered on purpose to help burn fat levels. However, high levels of ketones in the blood can sometimes hurt your body, because it leads to dehydration and alters the chemical composition of your blood. Symptoms of Ketosis You can test your body's ketosis levels by buying strips that test your urine for four types of ketones that can be present. High ketone levels can be dangerous because they actually alter your blood, making it more acidic (known as ketoacidosis). If the blood becomes too acidic, it is no longer compatible with the body, and it can cause coma or even death. Inducing ketoacidosis is possible when there is an over-consumption of alcohol, extreme fasting or starvation, or over-active thyroid functioning. If a diet is well-balanced, low carbohydrate consumption should not induce ketosis; however, avoiding carbohydrates all together can lead to problems. Proper hydration is important all the time, though it is particularly important during dieting of any kind. Diabetics are at risk of extreme ketosis when their insulin levels are t Continue reading >>

Ketosis Explained – For Weight Loss, Health Or Performance

Ketosis Explained – For Weight Loss, Health Or Performance

Get Started Ketosis is a natural state for the body, when it is almost completely fueled by fat. This is normal during fasting, or when on a strict low-carb diet. Ketosis has many potential benefits, but there are also side effects. In type 1 diabetes and certain other rare situations excessive ketosis can even become dangerous. On this page you can learn all about how to harness the benefits of ketosis, while avoiding any problems. It all starts with understanding what ketosis is. Choose a section, or keep reading below for all of them. Ketosis ExplainedKetosis Explained BenefitsBenefits How to Get Into KetosisHow to Get Into Ketosis Ketosis ExplainedSymptoms & How to Know You’re In Ketosis Side Effects, Fears & Potential DangersSide Effects, Fears & Potential Dangers How to Reach Optimal KetosisHow to Reach Optimal Ketosis ketones Ketosis Explained The “keto” in the word ketosis comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”.1 This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then consumed as fuel in the body, including by the brain. This is important as the brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day,2 and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones. Maximizing fat burning On a ketogenic diet your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is o Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

What is a Keto Diet? A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories but starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits. Make keto simple and easy by checking out our 30 Day Meal Plan. Get meal plans, shopping lists, and much more with our Keto Academy Program. Looking for Something Specific? There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical appl Continue reading >>

What Are Macros

What Are Macros

What Are Macros? Macronutrients are molecules that our bodies use to create energy for themselves – primarily fat, protein and carbs. They are found in all foods in varying amounts, measured in grams (g) on the nutrition labels. Fat provides 9 calories per gram Protein provides 4 calories per gram Carbohydrates provide 4 calories per gram Counting Calories vs. Counting Macros If you eat less calories than you burn, you will likely lose weight. But counting calories can only tell you so much; if you’re not careful and don’t eat the right calories, you’ll likely lose muscle too! To maintain, lose or even gain weight, many people rely on counting macros to make sure they’re eating correctly. 100 calories of avocado (fat) is a lot better than 100 calories of a doughnut (carbs). On a ketogenic (low carb, high fat) diet, it’s very important to know how many carbs you’re eating in comparison to fat and protein. Many people aim for less than 50g of carbs to maintain ketosis. When counting macros, you simply add up how many grams of fat, protein and carbs you ate that day. Let’s take an example: If you ate 10 Ritz crackers and wanted to calculate your macros for that meal, you would first determine how many servings you ate. If the serving size is 5 crackers and you ate 10, you would multiply every number on that label by 2. You would have eaten 8g of fat, 20g of carbs, and 2g of protein in that snack. In your log, you would then add all your grams of carbs, protein and fat up to a total so far. By seeing your macros visually, you can easily tell when you’re running a little high in carbs and know when to slow down. How to Calculate Your Optimal Macros Your optimal macronutrient intake depends on many different factors- your age, gender, weight, BMI and activit Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet has been in existence for 90 years The ketogenic diet was designed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic. Despite being highly effective in treating epilepsy, it fell out of fashion due to the surge in new anti-seizure medications in the 1940s. In 1994 Charlie Abraham’s family started The Charlie Foundation after his complete recovery from daily seizures despite trying all available anti-seizure medications and enduring a futile brain surgery. Charlie started the diet as a toddler and remained on it for 5 years. He is now a college student and remains seizure-free. Ketosis is the unique feature The diet is high in fat, supplies adequate protein and is low in carbohydrates. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. The Charlie Foundation is a global leader in promoting ketogenic therapies In 2006, The Charlie Foundation commissioned a panel comprised of neurologists and dietitians with particular expertise in using the ketogenic diet to create a consensus statement in support of the clinical management of the ketogenic diet and when it should be considered. Children are especially good candidates for the diet owing to their reliance on adults for nourishment and to the nature of a young developing brain. Comparison of diet therapies There are five levels of diet which have been published in medical literture as effective treatments for epilepsy: the classic ketogenic diet, the modified ketogenic diet, medium-chain triglyceride (MC Continue reading >>

Short Communication Concomitant Lamotrigine Use Is Associated With Decreased Efficacy Of The Ketogenic Diet In Childhood Refractory Epilepsy

Short Communication Concomitant Lamotrigine Use Is Associated With Decreased Efficacy Of The Ketogenic Diet In Childhood Refractory Epilepsy

Highlights • Specific AEDs may interfere with the rate of success of the KD. • Lamotrigine treatment during KD is associated with a decreased efficacy of the KD. • The percentage of children that had adequate ketosis was significantly reduced in case of lamotrigine use. • The underlying mechanisms of this lamotrigine associated reduction have to be clarified in future research. Abstract Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and the ketogenic diet (KD) are often used concomitantly in children with refractory epilepsy. It has been hypothesised that certain AEDs may interfere with KD. The purpose of this study was to elucidate relationships between efficacy of KD and use of specific AEDs. A retrospective study was performed in 71 children with refractory epilepsy starting the KD between 2008 and 2014 in Erasmus University Hospital Sophia Children's Hospital. Efficacy of the KD (defined as 50% seizure reduction) was evaluated after three months of treatment and related to the AEDs used. The KD was successful after three months in 61% of the children (N = 71). Efficacy was significantly reduced if children (n = 16) used lamotrigine (31%) at diet initiation or in the course of the diet, compared to other antiepileptic drugs (69%) (p = 0.006). In comparison to children using other antiepileptic drugs, the percentage of children that had adequate ketosis was significantly reduced in case of lamotrigine use (p = 0.049). Lamotrigine treatment during KD is associated with a decreased efficacy of the KD. Continue reading >>

Table Of Contents

Table Of Contents

Definition Origins Description Function Benefits Precautions Risks Resources Ketogenic diets are a group of high-fat, moderate-protein, and very low-carbohydrate diets given to treat some children and adolescents with epilepsy, and some adults with epilepsy and other diseases. The name ketogenic refers to the increased production of ketone bodies as a result of this special diet. Ketone bodies are three compounds that are formed during the metabolism of fats and are ordinarily excreted in the urine. An abnormally high level of ketone bodies is called keto-sis, and this condition is the goal of the ketogenic diet. It is thought that ketosis helps to control the frequency and severity of epileptic seizures, even though the reasons for this effect are not fully understood as of 2007. It has been known since Biblical times that some people with epilepsy were helped by prolonged periods of fasting, with good results. In earlier periods of history, children were kept on clear liquids for as long as two or three weeks until their seizures improved. This type of fasting, however, was obviously not sustainable as a long-term treatment. In 1921, a doctor at the MayoClinic named R. M. Wilder devised a diet for patients with epilepsy that was intended to mimic the biochemical changes that take place during fasting—ketosis, acidosis, and dehydration. Dr. Wilder’s ketogenic diet provided 10–15 grams of carbohydrates per day, 1 gram of protein for each kilogram of the patient’s body weight, and the remaining calories from fat. The calorie level was 75% of the normal daily allowance for the patient’s weight, and fluids were restricted to 80 percent. Wilder’s diet was almost identical to the protocol used at Johns Hopkins in 2007. Until the late 1930s, the Mayo Clinic ketoge Continue reading >>

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