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The Ugly Truth About Ketogenic Diets

Here's what you need to know... Ketosis occurs when carbs are in such low quantities that your body relies almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone metabolism. Ketogenic diets have about 70-75% of your daily caloric intake coming from fat and about 5% from carbohydrates. Ingesting protein above approximately .8 grams per pound is enough to kick you out of ketosis. Ketogenic diets improve body comp, but so does any diet that reduces calories from any source. There is no literature to support that a ketogenic diet is beneficial for promoting increases in muscle mass. Ketogenic diets affect performance negatively. Questions About Ketosis While the ketogenic diet has been used widely and rather effectively in some cases, there's still a lot of confusion about it. What exactly is a ketogenic diet? How does it differ from low carb dieting? Most importantly, at least for the T Nation demographic, is the question of whether ketogenic diets allow you to put on, or at least keep, muscle. Ketosis: What is it? Ketosis is a metabolic state that occurs when dietary carbohydrates are in such low quantities that your body must rely almost exclusively on fatty acid oxidation and ketone Continue reading >>

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  1. betterfretter

    According to Arnold's encyclopedia, going into a ketogenic state causes your body to burn amino acids for energy which is bad for muscle maintenance/growth. (Not quoting directly, but that's the gist)
    Been reading some new research:
    According to the American Heart Association (AHA) Nutrition Committee, "Some popular high-protein/low-carbohydrate diets limit carbohydrates to 10 to 20 g/d, which is one fifth of the minimum 100 g/day that is necessary to prevent loss of lean muscle tissue [1]." Clearly, this is an incorrect statement since catabolism of lean body mass is reduced by ketone bodies (possibly through suppression of the activity of the branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase), which and probably explains the preservation of lean tissue observed during very-low-carbohydrate diets. Unfortunately, the leading exercise physiology textbook also claims a "low-carbohydrate diet sets the stage for a significant loss of lean tissue as the body recruits amino acids from muscle to maintain blood glucose via gluconeogenesis [2]." Thus, it is certainly time to set the record straight.
    Source: http://www.jissn.com/content/1/2/7
    What are your thoughts on this? Ketosis is OK for fat loss while maintaining/growing?

  2. myhipsi

    According to Arnold's encyclopedia, going into a ketogenic state causes your body to burn amino acids for energy which is bad for muscle maintenance/growth.
    This is correct. Carbohydrates are protein sparing and glucose (the end product of carbohydrate) is REQUIRED for explosive muscular contraction/tension. So, if you fail to eat adequate amounts of carbohydrate to replenish glycogen stores, it will have a definite impact on strength. When glucose is severely lacking in the diet, the body will ramp up gluconeogenesis which is when the body uses fats and AMINO ACIDS to produce the required glucose your body uses, so you end up converting much of the protein you eat (and possibly muscle tissue itself) into glucose for fuel.
    In short: Ketosis (severe carbohydrate restriction) can be used as a dietary tool for people that are severely overweight/obese and SEDENTARY. For those that endeavor into weight training/body building or any other high performance based activity/sport, carbohydrates are required maximum performance.

  3. Bojangles010

    Yep. Did a research paper on this and came to the same conclusion. Keto is fantastic for weight loss, but not for any type of athletes or those looking to gain strength/mass. I really like your quick summary.

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