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Ketogenesis Vs Ketosis

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Is Ketosis Dangerous?

You may have heard from your doctor that ketosis is a life-threatening condition. If so, your doctor is confusing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with nutritional ketosis, or keto-adaptation. First, some semantics. Our body can produce, from fat and some amino acids, three ketone bodies (a “ketone” refers to the chemical structure where oxygen is double-bonded to carbon sandwiched between at least 2 other carbons). These ketone bodies we produce are: acetone, acetoacetone, and beta-hydroxybutyrate (B-OHB). [For anyone who is interested, they are the 3 most right structures on the figure, below.] Why do we make ketones? For starters, it’s a vital evolutionary advantage. Our brain can only function with glucose and ketones. Since we can’t store more than about 24 hours’ worth of glucose, we would all die of hypoglycemia if ever forced to fast for more than a day. Fortunately, our liver can take fat and select amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and turn them into ketones, first and foremost to feed our brains. Hence, our body’s ability to produce ketones is required for basic survival. What is diabetic ketoacidosis? When diabetics (usually Type I diabetics, but some Continue reading >>

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  1. Rcroix

    Hello everyone.
    I have been on the 2:5 for about 6 months and lost about 10kg (over 20lbs) So thank you Dr Mosley!
    A lot of the reviews of the fasting lifesyle seem to suggest that it is just a way to reduce average weekly calories, but I’m sure most of you think there is more going on than simple calorie reduction.
    During the last 10 days I didn’t fast as I was on holiday traveling and found it difficult. Amazingly I did not gain any weight. This has happend on two occasions during the last 6 months.
    I think the fasting days are forcing the body to relearn how to burn fat. I’m a bit confused about the correct scientific terms for this ‘lypolysis’ is I believe the breackdown of fats (into amino acids) and ketosis the burning of
    fat as fuel.
    What ever the terminology it seems like the fasting days teach the body a long forgotten trick of switching from available glucose derived from what we just ate, to reserves stored as fat.
    I suggest that this trait applies to non fast days too, hence the lack of weigh gain during holidays.
    I used to do a bit of distance running and am quite familiar with the concept of ‘hitting the wall’. This is when a runner runs out of glucose and has to switch to fat burning (around the 18mile mark). Often that process is difficult, I have had to sit on the ground for about 3 minutes until my legs felt like they would work again.
    I’m not running now so I can’t try a quick marathon to see if the diet has helped with the switch.
    I welcome your thoughts.
    Good luck
    Martin.
    Perhaps Dr Mosely could weigh in on this with some scientific evidence.

  2. zec4peach

    I love science and this is why I love the 5.2 as it makes so much sense.
    Your body will go into ketosis when fasting for a short time, this is probably why some people get headaches. It will also make you very thirsty and wee a lot as your body tries to flush out the by products from fat metabolism. This is a common symptom of type 1 diabetes but obviously they go into a severe more ketoacidosis due to prolonged lack of insulin and metabolism of glucose and start burning muscle for fuel.
    It’s quite complicated stuff but if you google fasting ketosis there’s loads of interesting info online. Michaels book was lacking in any science stuff which is a shame as I think people are interested.
    I know that athletes or very fit people are more efficient at burning fat as they are used to it so yes I think the 5.2 does reset the metabolism in a similar way.
    I have managed to this this after years of cycling and find I can ride for a few hours on an empty stomach. Always need coffee though !!!
    Z

  3. Nika

    Hey Martin!
    I’m also very interested in ketosis. I tried it out a few weeks ago and didn’t eat any carbs for 1,5 week. I lost quite some weight, but felt like I couldn’t sustain it – I started feeling really weak, dizzy, couldn’t walk straight some days and all in all didn’t get the energy boosts some people boast about.
    So now I just cut carbs on my fast days and allow myself fruit and yoghurt on normal days – still prefer not to eat rice, noodles, bread and potatoes though. Sometimes a baked good or chocolate pudding as a treat, but not regularly. I do think this really contributes to my quicker than average weightloss (7kg in 3 weeks, of which most during that first 1,5 week).
    I’ve also started working out fasted. I do this after work before my only meal of the day, so after fasting for over 20 hours. I do HIIT (Insanity), which combines cardio and strength through bodyweight exercises. So far my results have been worse than when I did the program before when eating regularly, but I’m waiting to see how it goes in two weeks when I do my second fit test. My body is most likely also learning how to switch to burning fat efficiently.
    What you said about going on a holiday, this reminded me of the “carb loaders” I know. They basically cut carbs during the week, then they “carbload” on Saturday – eating everything from pizza to ribs to whatever they want. They say that it doesn’t cause them to gain weight, because the body is still in fat burning mode and the glucose from the carbs goes straight to the muscles, giving the muscles the strength to keep working out through the next week. Hence carb ‘loading’. These people are basically in ketosis 3 days a week (it usually takes the body about 3 days to go into full ketosis).
    These are all bodybuilder types though, who do mostly strength training so it doesn’t really sound like a great idea for me. I wanna be lean, not buff.
    Anyway, long post – gonna head over to the next one
    Annika

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If you're not already using a nutrition app, you might want to consider downloading one--or two. New York City-based nutritionist Kristen Carlucci tells Health.com that nutrition apps are some of the best tools to reach and sustain your long-term health goals. Carlucci suggests MyFitnessPal for its impressive built-in food library. But when you're travelling, healthy fare is much harder to come by. That's why Health's contributing nutrition editor Cynthia Sass loves Food Tripping, an app that guides you towards healthier eateries along your route. As for labels, nutrition labels are meant to demystify products, but we often find ourselves more confused by them. No longer. For an easy fix, the Fooducate app lets you scan nutrition labels for a quick assessment of how healthy something really is. Finally, although grocery stores have become more accommodating to shoppers with food allergies, it can still be difficult to find products that fit your specific needs. For those with dietary restrictions, the app Ingredient quickly identifies products within your diet plan. Just apply a filter for your specific allergy, and the app will locate those gluten-free, soy-free, egg-free, nut-free, or dairy-free foods in nearby stores. http://www.health.com/nutrition/best-... http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit News using http://wochit.com

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: W Continue reading >>

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  1. Joanna_Osterloh

    My mom found some correlation between low carb consumption and depression. I believe she found this on a podcast of some sort. Perhaps THM?
    Regardless, I’m having a difficult time finding information for or against this idea. Any help provided would be greatly appreciated!

  2. James.K

    The Implications of Low Cholesterol in Depression and Suicide
    James M. Greenblatt, M.D. For the last quarter century, we have been told that cholesterol is dangerous for our health and were advised to avoid it in order to live a healthier life. However, cholesterol is essential in maintaining good...

  3. jilliangordona

    Anecdotal, but my depression has disappeared since removing carbs

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Take Dr. Berg's Advanced Evaluation Quiz: http://bit.ly/EvalQuiz Your report will then be sent via email analyzing 104 potential symptoms, giving you a much deeper insight into the cause-effect relationship of your body issues. It's free and very enlightening. Dr. Berg discusses the debate on what should be eaten during exercising. Go no carbs? Do high carbs? High fats? Somewhere in between? Dr. Berg strips away a very common false datum and gives some insight in this subject. RESEARCH http://www.metabolismjournal.com/arti... http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/... http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/... Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional and natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government and the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning, published by KB Publishing in January 2011. Dr. Berg trains chiropractors, physicians and allied healthcare practitioners in his methods, and to date he has trained over 2,500 healthcare professionals. He has been an active member of the Endocrinology Society, and has worked as a past part-time adjunct professor at Howard University. DR. BERG'S VIDEO BLOG: http://www.drberg.com/blog FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/DrEricBerg TWITTER: http://twitter.com/DrBergDC YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/drericbe... ABOUT DR. BERG: http://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/bio DR. BERG'S SEMINARS: http://www.drberg.com/seminars DR. BERG'S STORY: http://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/story DR. BERG'S CLINIC: https://www.drberg.com/dr-eric-berg/c... DR. BERG'S HEALTH COACHING TRAINING: http://www.drberg.com/weight-loss-coach DR. BERG'S SHOP: http://shop.drberg.com/ DR. BERG'S REVIEWS: http://www.drberg.com/reviews The Health & Wellness Center 4709 D Pinecrest Office Park Drive Alexandria, VA 22312 703-354-7336 Disclaimer: Dr. Eric Berg received his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1988. His use of doctor or Dr. in relation to himself solely refers to that degree. Dr. Berg is a licensed chiropractor in Virginia, California, and Louisiana, but he no longer practices chiropractic in any state and does not see patients. This video is for general informational purposes only. It should not be used to self-diagnose and it is not a substitute for a medical exam, cure, treatment, diagnosis, and prescription or recommendation. It does not create a doctor-patient relationship between Dr. Berg and you. You should not make any change in your health regimen or diet before first consulting a physician and obtaining a medical exam, diagnosis, and recommendation. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. The Health & Wellness, Dr. Berg Nutritionals and Dr. Eric Berg, D.C. are not liable or responsible for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or product you obtain through this video or site.

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk Continue reading >>

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  1. xi_mezmerize_ix

    Been creeping a few weeks on here and I have a couple questions.
    It seems the majority of you guys on CKD have carb-up days. I was just wondering if a large carb-up meal would suffice. I'm in college and my dining plan allows me one "free" meal at the school buffet each week, so I figured it would be the perfect time for my carb-up. Obviously, I would have to make sure I am not going overboard, as I can really pack it in.
    Also, I'm a little confused as to how CKD doesn't knock you out of ketosis. I thought any huge influx of carbs knocked you out of ketosis, and then it would be a few days before you were back in full keto, which you would then be out of in a few days again. My only guess is that the carb-up, provided you eat the right amount of carbs, only refills your glycogen stores and doesn't impact ketosis. Is this right?

  2. darthluiggi

    Hey! First lets review the terms:
    From "The Ketogenic Diet" by Lyle McDonald:

    The standard ketogenic Diet (SKD) is what most think of as the ketogenic diet. It is a diet low in carbohydrate, and moderate-high in both protein and fat.

    The Targeted Ketogenic Diet (TKD) is nothing more than the standard ketogenic diet (SKD) with carbohydrates consumed at specific times around exercise. This means that carbohydrates are consumed on days when exercise is performed. If fat loss is the goal, the number of calories consumed as carbohydrates should be subtracted from total calories, meaning that less dietary fat is consumed on those days. The TKD is a compromise approach between the SKD and the CKD. The TKD will allow individuals on a ketogenic diet to perform high intensity activity (or aerobic exercise for long periods of time) without having to interrupt ketosis for long periods of time.

    The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD) As with the TKD, the CKD attempts to harness the effects of a ketogenic diet while maintaining exercise performance. However, rather than providing carbohydrates only around exercise, the CKD inserts a one- or two-day period of high carbohydrate eating to refill muscle glycogen. This means that for the CKD to work, muscle glycogen must be depleted fully each week. This means that the CKD is not appropriate for beginning exercisers or those who are unable to perform the amount of training necessary. The standard format for a CKD is to alternate 5-6 days of ketogenic dieting with 1-2 days of high carbohydrate eating, although other variations can be developed. Individuals have experimented with longer cycles (10-12 days) as well as shorter cycles (3-4) days with good results. A 7 day cycle is more a choice of convenience than anything physiological, since it fits most people’s work schedule and allows dieters to eat more or less ‘normally’ on the weekends. During the carb-loading phase of the CKD, the body’s metabolism is temporarily switched out of ketosis, with the goal of refilling muscle glycogen levels to sustain exercise performance in the next cycle.
    That aside, eating carbs on TKD or CKD temporarily takes you out of ketosis, you refill your glycogen stores and empty them again with excersise.
    Yes, you could do CKD with just one carb up per day.
    It is not really necesary to go TKD or CKD. Carb ups / CKD are not recommended, if:
    Fat loss is your primary goal and you are over 15% BF
    You have been on Standard Keto less than 9 months
    You are not an experienced lifter

  3. thebraken

    Gonna try to answer this without a wall of text. :D
    Can you do it in one meal?
    Yes, read up on the Apex Predator Diet for one way of handling that.
    Does carbing up knock you out of ketosis?
    Yes, briefly and purposefully, but then you jump right back in.

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