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Ketoacidosis Word Breakdown

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Diabetes Glossary

Antibodies Antibodies are specialized proteins that are part of the immune system. They are created when an antigen (such as a virus or bacteria) is detected in the body. The antibodies bond with the specific antigen that triggered their production, and that action neutralizes the antigen, which is a threat to the body. Antibodies are created to fight off whatever has invaded the body. See also autoantibodies. Antigens An antigen is a foreign substance (such as a virus or bacteria) that invades the body. When the body detects it, it produces specific antibodies to fight off the antigen. Autoantibodies Autoantibodies are a group of antibodies that “go bad” and mistakenly attack and damage the body’s tissues and organs. In the case of type 1 diabetes, autoantibodies attack the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Autoimmune disorder If you have an autoimmune disorder (also called an autoimmune disease), your body’s immune system turns against itself and starts to attack its own tissues. Basal secretion (basal insulin) We all should have a small amount of insulin that’s constantly present in the blood; that is the basal secretion. People with type 1 diabetes must ta Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Diamattic

    This may be a weird questions but i was comparing some blood work i had done in January 2011 (back before i had T1D) and the blood work that was conducted a couple days after i was admitted to the hospital. I have nothing in between those dates.
    I was admitted to the Emergency room with Diabetic Ketoacidocis, and they drew blood everyday but only on the first day did they do a full work up which included my cholesterol levels.. when i compare these numbers to what i had come back from the lab in 2011 i find quite a difference. The May 2014 numbers are much lower across the board then the Jan 2011 numbers.
    My question is - Is this change because i likely spent so much time undiagnosed and in which case they will likely go back up? or does DKA not really affect these numbers and thats just an accurate look at my levels these days?
    Thanks!

  2. Diamattic

    Well, i kept searching and found this research paper - http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-3/211.pdf
    It talks mostly about Alcohol use in diabetics, BUT it mentions DKA can occur tom alcohol abuse and then goes on to explain how that DKA can alter lipid metabolism, which isn't exactly what i was looking for BUT it does say that it can lower your LDL, and raise your HDL for a short period in which it will return to normal afterwards.. So maybe my levels were abnormally low but returned to where they were afterwards...
    SIDENOTE - This paper also mentions that in non-habitual drinkers having 2.5-5 standard alcoholic drinks occasionally can be beneficial to BS levels haha However, habitual drinking (i.e. - daily drinks) is a no-no..
    Does anyone know anything conclusive though, I am still wondering how much i can trust these numbers?

  3. pavlosn

    Ketosis based diets are known too rely on burning triglycerides for fuel instead of glucose of fuel, as well as to reduce LDL and increase HDL.
    DKA is effectively ketosis but on a more problematic scale. This time it is brought about not by a restriction in carbs and lowering of glucose but by a lack of insulin to transfer the glucose to the blood, I would expect both to have a similar effect on lipids.
    Where triglycerides significantly reduced after DKA?
    Not that DKA would ever qualify as a treatment for high cholesterol!
    Pavlos

  4. -> Continue reading
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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Diamattic

    This may be a weird questions but i was comparing some blood work i had done in January 2011 (back before i had T1D) and the blood work that was conducted a couple days after i was admitted to the hospital. I have nothing in between those dates.
    I was admitted to the Emergency room with Diabetic Ketoacidocis, and they drew blood everyday but only on the first day did they do a full work up which included my cholesterol levels.. when i compare these numbers to what i had come back from the lab in 2011 i find quite a difference. The May 2014 numbers are much lower across the board then the Jan 2011 numbers.
    My question is - Is this change because i likely spent so much time undiagnosed and in which case they will likely go back up? or does DKA not really affect these numbers and thats just an accurate look at my levels these days?
    Thanks!

  2. Diamattic

    Well, i kept searching and found this research paper - http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-3/211.pdf
    It talks mostly about Alcohol use in diabetics, BUT it mentions DKA can occur tom alcohol abuse and then goes on to explain how that DKA can alter lipid metabolism, which isn't exactly what i was looking for BUT it does say that it can lower your LDL, and raise your HDL for a short period in which it will return to normal afterwards.. So maybe my levels were abnormally low but returned to where they were afterwards...
    SIDENOTE - This paper also mentions that in non-habitual drinkers having 2.5-5 standard alcoholic drinks occasionally can be beneficial to BS levels haha However, habitual drinking (i.e. - daily drinks) is a no-no..
    Does anyone know anything conclusive though, I am still wondering how much i can trust these numbers?

  3. pavlosn

    Ketosis based diets are known too rely on burning triglycerides for fuel instead of glucose of fuel, as well as to reduce LDL and increase HDL.
    DKA is effectively ketosis but on a more problematic scale. This time it is brought about not by a restriction in carbs and lowering of glucose but by a lack of insulin to transfer the glucose to the blood, I would expect both to have a similar effect on lipids.
    Where triglycerides significantly reduced after DKA?
    Not that DKA would ever qualify as a treatment for high cholesterol!
    Pavlos

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a very serious complication of diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased body ketone concentrations. The most common causes of DKA are infection and poor compliance with medication regimens. Other causes include undiagnosed diabetes, alcohol abuse, and a multitude of medical conditions such as cerebrovascular accident (CVA), complicated pregnancy, myocardial infarction, pancreatitis, and stress. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complicated pathology. Early recognition of DKA, a good understanding of the pathological processes of DKA, and aggressive treatment are the keys to successful treatment. With good care, DKA can be managed and the patient will survive. OBJECTIVES When the student has finished studying this module, he/she will be able to: 1. Identify the correct definition of DKA. 2. Identify a basic function of insulin. 3. Identify the insulin derangements of types I and II diabetes. 4. Identify the basic cause of DKA. 5. Identify two specific causes of DKA. 6. Identify the two pathogenic mechanisms that produce the signs/symptoms of DKA. 7. Identify metabolic conseq Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Diamattic

    This may be a weird questions but i was comparing some blood work i had done in January 2011 (back before i had T1D) and the blood work that was conducted a couple days after i was admitted to the hospital. I have nothing in between those dates.
    I was admitted to the Emergency room with Diabetic Ketoacidocis, and they drew blood everyday but only on the first day did they do a full work up which included my cholesterol levels.. when i compare these numbers to what i had come back from the lab in 2011 i find quite a difference. The May 2014 numbers are much lower across the board then the Jan 2011 numbers.
    My question is - Is this change because i likely spent so much time undiagnosed and in which case they will likely go back up? or does DKA not really affect these numbers and thats just an accurate look at my levels these days?
    Thanks!

  2. Diamattic

    Well, i kept searching and found this research paper - http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh22-3/211.pdf
    It talks mostly about Alcohol use in diabetics, BUT it mentions DKA can occur tom alcohol abuse and then goes on to explain how that DKA can alter lipid metabolism, which isn't exactly what i was looking for BUT it does say that it can lower your LDL, and raise your HDL for a short period in which it will return to normal afterwards.. So maybe my levels were abnormally low but returned to where they were afterwards...
    SIDENOTE - This paper also mentions that in non-habitual drinkers having 2.5-5 standard alcoholic drinks occasionally can be beneficial to BS levels haha However, habitual drinking (i.e. - daily drinks) is a no-no..
    Does anyone know anything conclusive though, I am still wondering how much i can trust these numbers?

  3. pavlosn

    Ketosis based diets are known too rely on burning triglycerides for fuel instead of glucose of fuel, as well as to reduce LDL and increase HDL.
    DKA is effectively ketosis but on a more problematic scale. This time it is brought about not by a restriction in carbs and lowering of glucose but by a lack of insulin to transfer the glucose to the blood, I would expect both to have a similar effect on lipids.
    Where triglycerides significantly reduced after DKA?
    Not that DKA would ever qualify as a treatment for high cholesterol!
    Pavlos

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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