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Ketoacidosis When Pregnant

Ketoacidosis In Diabetic Pregnancy

Ketoacidosis In Diabetic Pregnancy

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious medical and obstetrical emergency previously considered typical of type 1 diabetes but now reported also in type 2 and GDM patients. Although it is a fairly rare condition, DKA in pregnancy can compromise both fetus and mother. Metabolic changes occurring during pregnancy predispose to DKA in fact it can develop even in setting of normoglycemia. This article will provide the reader with information regarding the pathophysiology underlying DKA, in particular euglycemic DKA, and will provide information regarding all possible effects of ketones on the fetus. Continue reading >>

Case Of Nondiabetic Ketoacidosis In Third Term Twin Pregnancy | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

Case Of Nondiabetic Ketoacidosis In Third Term Twin Pregnancy | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

We provided appropriate management with fluid infusion after cesarean delivery. The patient and her two daughters survived, and no disabilities were foreseen. Alcohol, methanol, and lactic acid levels were normal. No signs of renal disease or diabetes were present. Pathological examination revealed no abnormalities of the placentae. Toxicological tests revealed a salicylate level of less than 5 mg/liter, an acetaminophen level of less than 1 mg/liter, and an acetone level of 300 mg/liter (reference, 520 mg/liter). We present a case of third term twin pregnancy with high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to (mild) starvation. Starvation, obesity, third term twin pregnancy, and perhaps a gastroenteritis were the ultimate provoking factors. In the light of the erroneous suspicion of sepsis and initial fluid therapy lacking glucose, one wonders whether, under a different fluid regime, cesarean section could have been avoided. Severe ketoacidosis in the pregnant woman is associated with impaired neurodevelopment. It therefore demands early recognition and immediate intervention. A 26-yr-old patient was admitted to our hospital complaining of rapid progressive dyspnea and abdominal discomfort. She was pregnant with dichorial, diamniotic twins for 35 wk and 4 d. Medical history showed that she was heterozygous for hemochromatosis. Two years before, she had given birth to a healthy girl of 3925 g by cesarean section, and 1 yr before, she had had a spontaneous abortion. Her preadmission outpatient surveillance revealed slightly elevated blood pressure varying from 132158 mm Hg systolic and 7995 mm Hg diastolic. Glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin were tested at 24 wk and were normal at 4.6 mmol/liter and 5.4% (36 mmol/mol), respectively. Urine analysis at the outpatient obstetri Continue reading >>

Retrospective Analysis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnant Women Over A Period Of 3 Years

Retrospective Analysis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnant Women Over A Period Of 3 Years

1Department of Diabetes and Endocrine, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar 3Department of Obstetrics, Sidra Medical and Research Center, Doha, Qatar Corresponding Author: Khaled Ahmed Baagar Department of Diabetes and Endocrine Hamad Medical Corporation, P.O. Box 3050, Doha, Qatar Tel: +974-66049423 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Baagar KA, Aboudi AK, Khaldi HM, Alowinati BI, Abou-Samra AB, et al. (2017) Retrospective Analysis of Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Pregnant Women over a Period of 3 Years . Endocrinol Metab Syndr 6:265. doi:10.4172/2161-1017.1000265 Copyright: © 2017 Baagar KA, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Endocrinology & Metabolic Syndrome Abstract Objective: The incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy (DKP) varies from 0.5%, the lowest reported rate in western countries, to 8.9% in a study conducted in China. The associated fetal mortality is 9-36%. This study aimed to assess the current incidence, causes, and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and identify factors associated with favorable outcomes. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 20 diabetic ketoacidosis hospital admissions of 19 pregnant women from 3,679 diabetic pregnancies delivered between June 2012 and May 2015 was conducted. Those with successful DKP management (group A) or with intrauterine fetal death or urgent delivery during diabetic ketoacidosis management (group B) were compared. Results: Thirteen cases had type 1 diabetes, and 6 cases had Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Sibai, Baha M. MD; Viteri, Oscar A. MD Pregnancies complicated by diabetic ketoacidosis are associated with increased rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality. A high index of suspicion is required, because diabetic ketoacidosis onset in pregnancy can be insidious, usually at lower glucose levels, and often progresses more rapidly as compared with nonpregnancy. Morbidity and mortality can be reduced with early detection of precipitating factors (ie, infection, intractable vomiting, inadequate insulin management or inappropriate insulin cessation, β-sympathomimetic use, steroid administration for fetal lung maturation), prompt hospitalization, and targeted therapy with intensive monitoring. A multidisciplinary approach including a maternal-fetal medicine physician, medical endocrinology specialists familiar with the physiologic changes in pregnancy, an obstetric anesthesiologist, and skilled nursing is paramount. Management principles include aggressive volume replacement, initiation of intravenous insulin therapy, correction of acidosis, correction of electrolyte abnormalities and management of precipitating factors, as well as monitoring of maternal-fetal response to treatment. When diabetic ketoacidosis occurs after 24 weeks of gestation, fetal status should be continuously monitored given associated fetal hypoxemia and acidosis. The decision for delivery can be challenging and must be based on gestational age as well as maternal-fetal responses to therapy. The natural inclination is to proceed with emergent delivery for nonreassuring fetal status that is frequently present during the acute episode, but it is imperative to correct the maternal metabolic abnormalities first, because both maternal and fetal conditions will likewise improve. Prevention strategies shou Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Go to: Case A 27-year-old female in her fourth pregnancy presented at 31 weeks’ gestation to the delivery suite with reduced fetal movements on a background of a week-long history of vomiting, poor oral intake and intermittent upper abdominal pain radiating to her back. Her past medical history was notable for depression and a psychotic episode 2 years prior to this pregnancy. Her previous pregnancies were not complicated by GDM. She had stopped her antipsychotic medication prior to her booking appointment, but was admitted to a psychiatric hospital at 20 weeks of gestation with a further episode. At that time olanzapine 20mg daily was commenced in addition to the 40mg fluoxetine that she had been taking regularly prior to and throughout pregnancy. At 23 and 27 weeks of gestation, glycosuria was identified on urine dipstick testing. Metformin was commenced after an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test (fasting glucose 8.1mmol/L, 2h glucose 12.7mmol/L) at 28 weeks. Metformin resulted in some improvement in glycaemic control. She had taken no other medications during pregnancy and denied any substance misuse. Booking body mass index was 37kg/m2. On examination she looked unwell. She was tachypnoeic, tachycardic and hypertensive (heart rate 130 beats per minute, blood pressure 162/103mm Hg). On abdominal palpation there was tenderness in the epigastric region without peritonism. The gravid uterus was an appropriate size for gestational age. Cardiotocography was reassuring. Blood tests were notable for anaemia (haemoglobin 10.4g/dL) and neutrophilia (20.1×109/L). Urinalysis was positive for protein (trace) and ketones (4+). Arterial blood gas analysis showed a profound metabolic acidosis with partial respiratory compensation (pH 7.24, PaCO2 1.4kPa, PaO2 15.5kPa, base exc Continue reading >>

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Life-threatening Ketoacidosis In A Pregnant Woman With Psychotic Disorder

Pregnancy is an insulin resistant state. Hyperglycaemia and gestational diabetes mellitus are well-recognised complications even in women without existing metabolic syndrome or obesity. Pregnant women also appear to be more vulnerable to ketoacidosis, particularly after short periods of reduced oral intake in the third trimester, and may present with very severe starvation ketoacidosis, prompting emergent delivery. We present a case of a woman with a background of depression and psychotic episodes. Olanzapine had been commenced after a psychotic episode at 20 weeks’ gestation. Gestational diabetes mellitus was diagnosed at 28 weeks, and she was then admitted at 31 weeks with severe euglycaemic ketoacidosis following a short period of vomiting. She underwent caesarean section when the metabolic disturbances did not resolve with medical treatment. We believe atypical antipsychotic therapy contributed to the profound insulin resistance seen here, and that obstetricians, physicians and psychiatrists must be aware of the risks conferred by these agents in pregnancy. 1. Knight M, Tuffnell D, Kenyon S, et al. (eds) on behalf of MBRRACE-UK. Saving Lives, Improving Mothers' Care – Surveillance of maternal deaths in the UK 2011–13 and lessons learned to inform maternity care from the UK and Ireland Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and Morbidity 2009–13. Oxford: National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, 2015. Google Scholar 2. Jin, H, Meyer, JM, Jeste, DV. Phenomenology of and risk factors for new-onset diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis associated with atypical antipsychotics: an analysis of 45 published cases. Ann Clin Psychiatry 2002; 14: 59–64. Google Scholar, Crossref, Medline 3. Leslie, DL, Rosenheck, RA. Incidence of newly dia Continue reading >>

What Is The Treatments For Ketoacidosis?

What Is The Treatments For Ketoacidosis?

Management of diabetic ketoacidos Time: 0–60 mins 1. Commence 0.9% sodium chloride If systolic BP > 90 mmHg, give 1 L over 60 mins If systolic BP < 90 mmHg, give 500 mL over 10–15 mins, then re-assess. If BP remains < 90 mmHg, seek senior review 2. Commence insulin treatment 50 U human soluble insulin in 50 mL 0.9% sodium chloride infused intravenously at 0.1 U/kg body weight/hr Continue with SC basal insulin analogue if usually taken by patient 3. Perform further investigations: see text 4. Establish monitoring schedule Hourly capillary blood glucose and ketone testing Venous bicarbonate and potassium after 1 and 2 hrs, then every 2 hrs Plasma electrolytes every 4 hrs Clinical monitoring of O2 saturation, pulse, BP, respiratory rate and urine output every hour 5. Treat any precipitating cause Time: 60 mins to 12 hrs • IV infusion of 0.9% sodium chloride with potassium chloride added as indicated below 1 L over 2 hrs 1 L over 2 hrs 1 L over 4 hrs 1 L over 4 hrs 1 L over 6 hrs • Add 10% glucose 125 mL/hr IV when glucose < 14 mmol/L • Be more cautious with fluid replacement in elderly, young people, pregnant patients and those with renal or heart failure. If plasma sodium is > 155 mmol/L, 0.45% sodium chloride may be used. • Adjust potassium chloride infusion Plasma potassium (mmol/L) Potassium replacement (mmol/L of infusion) > 5.5 Nil 3.5–5.5 40 < 3.5 Senior review – additional potassium required Time: 12–24 hrs • Ketonaemia and acidosis should have resolved (blood ketones < 0.3 mmol/L, venous bicarbonate > 18 mmol/L). Request senior review if not improving • If patient is not eating and drinking Continue IV insulin infusion at lower rate of 2–3 U/kg/hr Continue IV fluid replacement and biochemical monitoring • If ketoacidosis has resolved and Continue reading >>

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Four Case Studies Of Severe Metabolic Acidosis In Pregnancy

Summarized from Frise C, Mackillop L, Joash K et al. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol 2012. Available online ahead of publication at: Arterial blood gas analysis in cases of metabolic acidosis reveals primary decrease in pH and bicarbonate, and secondary (compensatory) reduction in pCO2. The most common cause of metabolic acidosis is increased production of endogenous metabolic acids, either lactic acid, in which case the condition is called lactic acidosis, or keto-acids, in which case the condition is called ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis most commonly occurs as an acute and life-threatening complication of type I diabetes, due to severe insulin deficiency and resulting reduced glucose availability for energy production within cells (insulin is required for glucose to enter cells). Keto-acids accumulate in blood as a result of metabolism of fats mobilized to fill the energy gap created by reduced availability of glucose within cells. Starvation is also associated with reduced availability of (dietary) glucose and potential for ketoacidosis, although compared with diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis is rare, usually mild and not life-threatening. Except, that is, when it occurs during pregnancy. In a recently published paper the authors outline four cases of severe starvation ketoacidosis, all occurring in the third trimester of pregnancy, following prolonged vomiting over a period of days. All four women presented for emergency admission in a very poorly state and still vomiting with severe partially compensated metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate in the range of 8-13 mmol/L and base deficit in the range of 14-22 mmol/L). All four required transfer to intensive care and premature delivery of their babies by emergency Cesarean section. Fort Continue reading >>

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Starvation Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Introduction: Starvation ketosis outside pregnancy is a rare phenomenon and is unlikely to cause a severe acidosis. Pregnancy is an insulin resistant state due to placental production of hormones including glucagon and human placental lactogen. Insulin resistance increases with advancing gestation and this confers a susceptibility to ketosis, particularly in the third trimester. Starvation ketoacidosis in pregnancy has been reported and is usually precipitated by a period of severe vomiting. Ketoacidosis has been associated with intrauterine death. Case report: A 22-year-old woman in her third pregnancy presented at 32 weeks gestation with a 24 h history of severe vomiting. She had been treated for an asthma exacerbation with prednisolone and erythromycin the day prior to presentation. She was unwell, hypertensive (145/70 mmHg) with a sinus tachycardia and Kussmaul breathing. Urinalysis showed ++++ ketones, + protein and pH 5. Fingerprick glucose was 4 mmol/l and ketones were 4.0 mmol/l. Arterial blood gas showed pH 7.27, PaCO2 1.1 kPa, base excess −23, bicarbonate 8.6 mmol/l and lactate 0.6 mmol/l. The anion gap was 20. Serum ethanol, salicylates and paracetamol levels were undetectable. She was fluid resuscitated but her biochemical parameters did not improve. She was intubated and underwent emergency caesarean section. A healthy boy was delivered and her acidosis resolved over the subsequent 8 h. Discussion: We believe this case is explained by starvation ketoacidosis. There was no evidence of diabetes mellitus or other causes of a metabolic acidosis. In view of the hypertension, proteinuria and raised urate the differential diagnosis was an atypical presentation of pre-eclampsia. This case illustrates the metabolic stress imposed by the feto-placental unit. It als Continue reading >>

What Are The Common Symptoms Of Diabetes?

What Are The Common Symptoms Of Diabetes?

If you have any of the following diabetes symptoms, see your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested: Urinate (pee) a lot, often at night Are very thirsty Lose weight without trying Are very hungry Have blurry vision Have numb or tingling hands or feet Feel very tired Have very dry skin Have sores that heal slowly Have more infections than usual People who have type 1 diabetes may also have nausea, vomiting, or stomach pains. Type 1 diabetes symptoms can develop in just a few weeks or months and can be severe. Type 1 diabetes usually starts when you’re a child, teen, or young adult but can happen at any age. Type 2 diabetes symptoms often develop over several years and can go on for a long time without being noticed (sometimes there aren’t any noticeable symptoms at all). Type 2 diabetes usually starts when you’re an adult, though more and more children, teens, and young adults are developing it. Because symptoms are hard to spot, it’s important to know the risk factors for type 2 diabetes and visit your doctor if you have any of them. Disclaimer: I am the co-founder of DeeveHealth. DeeveHealth is a mobile platform to prevent Type 2 diabetes. Based on the scientific behavior of human and science of prevention using data points. For more information check out our web-site Continue reading >>

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

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[normoglycaemic Ketoacidosis In Pregnant Patients With Diabetes; Early Recognition Is Critical].

[normoglycaemic Ketoacidosis In Pregnant Patients With Diabetes; Early Recognition Is Critical].

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during pregnancy is a rare but very serious complication that requires early recognition and treatment to prevent severe complications. Here we present three cases in which DKA occurred during normoglycaemia, demonstrating the importance of early recognition. In pregnancy, DKA can occur at lower blood glucose levels than usual due to several pregnancy-related factors, such as altered metabolism, increased insulin resistance, lower buffering capacity related to chronic hyperventilation and hunger. Symptoms that are common during pregnancy, such as vomiting, may be missed as a first sign of DKA. In patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (especially those on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion) insulin administration must never be discontinued, as this prevents lipolysis and ketone formation. Physicians and patients need to be aware of the risks and management of DKA in pregnancy. Continue reading >>

How Can L Control My Blood Sugar?

How Can L Control My Blood Sugar?

When your body fails to transport sugar from blood into cells, high blood sugar occurs. And if left unchecked, it leads to diabetes. Mentioned below are some tactics that could help you lower blood sugar levels: - Regular exercise - Reduce Carbohydrate intake - Include fiber in your diet - Stay hydrated - Opt for food items with low glycemic index - Eat foods rich in magnesium (whole grains, avocados, etc) and chromium (egg yolks, nuts, green beans) Apart from the above mentioned points, make it a point to include herbal supplements in your lifestyle. As compared to modern, synthetic medicines, Herbal medicines are free of side-effects and are focused on root causes. Some of the herbals for controlling blood sugar are as follows: - Himalaya Diabecon’ - Himalaya Karela Blood Sugar - Himalaya Gymnema Blood Glucose Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

What Is Diabetes Mellitus?

Diabetes mellitus, or simply, diabetes, is a disease that damages the body when the blood glucose (sugar) is allowed to remain too high for too many years. Major Types of Diabetes There are several major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is the form that used to be called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. It starts most often in childhood. The patient has an absolute need for the hormone insulin, since his pancreas, the organ that makes insulin, can no longer do so. The insulin is usually given by injection and must be balanced by food intake in order to keep the blood glucose as normal as possible. Type 2 diabetes is the form that used to be called adult-onset diabetes. It is a lifestyle disease, resulting from excessive weight gain and lack of exercise. The patient does not lack insulin, but has insensitivity to his own body’s insulin. Treatment is started with diet and exercise but may ultimately require pills or insulin. Gestational diabetes is the form that occurs in pregnancy when the hormones of pregnancy overwhelm the body’s insulin so that the blood glucose rises. It can cause problems with the growing fetus who tends to grow large and have a difficult delivery. Gestational diabetes can also become type 2 diabetes later in life. Diagnosis of Diabetes The diagnosis of all types of diabetes is made when the blood glucose in the overnight fasting state is 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or higher on more than one occasion. The diagnosis may also be made if the blood glucose after eating rises to 200 mg/dl or higher on more than one occasion. Recently the finding of a level of 6.5 percent or greater in a blood test called a hemoglobin A1c has been added to the recommended way of making a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The different types o Continue reading >>

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