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Ketoacidosis Vs Ketosis

What’s The Difference? Ketoacidosis Vs. Ketosis

What’s The Difference? Ketoacidosis Vs. Ketosis

Ever come across these two terms while searching for healthy living tips: ketoacidosis and ketosis? If you’ve ever looked into the keto lifestyle, odds are you have come across both of these terms at some point. You may have also come across people who warned you about the dangers of ketosis. Sadly, there’s a massive misconception that nutritional ketosis brought on by eating low-carb, high-fat is the same thing as ketoacidosis… They’re NOT the same thing. Ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition where ketone bodies and blood sugar levels are EXTREMELY HIGH at the same time. Being in a state of nutritional ketosis brought on by a low-carb, high-fat diet allows you to burn fat for fuel instead of glucose/carbohydrates. In this state, our ketone bodies are elevated (about 3 mmol/l compared to the 30 mmol/l in ketoacidosis) and our blood sugar is LOW. Here’s the official rundown of the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. If you’re unsure about what ketosis or the ketogenic diet is all about, I highly recommend watching this video where I go in depth regarding what is involved in a keto lifestyle. My experience has been phenomenal! Here are some things that this keto lifestyle can help you with: Reduced blood sugar Increased HDL cholesterol Weight loss Normal cycle for women Overcoming hypothyroidism Overcoming bulimia Balanced moods Boosted energy Reduced cravings And more! If any of these are things you’re dealing with, you are not alone! I’ve dealt with these issues personally, and can say that keto has changed my life for the better! I also believe it can help you. Are there any other terms out there related to keto that you’re unsure about? Ask me in the comments! Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis (dka) Vs Ketosis What’s The Difference?

Ketoacidosis (dka) Vs Ketosis What’s The Difference?

Although ketosis and ketoacidosis may sound the same, they are two distinct things. We are going to be talking about the difference between ketoacidosis and ketosis and what makes the two diverse from one another. In order to provide a good explanation of what these conditions are and how they affect the body, we must talk about their main common denominator, the ketones. These are organic compounds that the body will provide when it starts to burn stored fat instead of burning glucose or sugar when it requires energy. What is Ketoacidosis? DKA applies to diabetic ketoacidosis and is a complication of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis is a very dangerous condition that makes it difficult for your body to be able to produce a good level of insulin. Your levels of ketones can rise to very dangerous levels, which will also increase your blood sugar. The ketones create a very acidic environment inside your body, and the function of certain organs will be affected severely. It becomes a life-threatening situation when presented with high levels of ketones and excess blood sugar. Anyone not given proper treatment for DKA could end up in a coma and even die. The kidneys and liver are affected more than most other organs, and this can create a very serious health issue. Once a person develops what is known as diabetic ketoacidosis, they will show severe symptoms within as little as 24 hours. When a person has type one diabetes, they are in great danger of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. What is ketosis The best way to explain ketosis is to consider it a very mild form of ketoacidosis, and the truth is that this is not going to be harmful most of the time. In your lifestyle, if you’re on a ketogenic diet nutrition plan or any long-term low-carb diet, you might be experiencing ke Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

The Difference Between Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

When you hear these two terms it’s easy to see how they can be confused. The confusion also stems from the fact that the two are both metabolic processes involving the breakdown of fats in the body (plus they look and sound like similar words). The truth is ketosis and ketoacidosis are two completely different things. Ketosis and the Ketogenic Diet Ketosis is a normal metabolic process in which the body has a high fat-burning rate. It is a healthy and natural state your body enters when your body is running on fat rather than glucose1. The state of ketosis occurs when ketone levels are raised in the blood due to the conversion of fats into fatty acids and ketones. This happens when the body runs out of carbohydrates – usually because a person hasn’t eaten in a while, for example during fasts, or they eat a very low-carbohydrate diet – leaving little sugar to convert into glycogen. Without glycogen, the body breaks down fat cells for energy. A low-carb, high fat diet, also known as a ketogenic diet, is necessary to enter and stay in ketosis long-term. When you eat a low-carbohydrate diet, your body enters the metabolic state of ketosis within 2 days but it can vary from person to person. There are many benefits2 to being in longer-term ketosis including: lowered triglycerides levels no spikes in blood glucose levels greater mental clarity lowered blood pressure and cholesterol reduced food and sugar cravings weight loss Ketoacidosis – The Body in a State of Toxicity Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state of toxicity. It occurs when the body fails to regulate ketone production resulting in severe accumulation of keto acids which cause the pH of the blood to decrease substantially making the blood more acidic. The most common causes for ketoacidosis are Type 1 Diabete Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: 25 Proven Benefits And How To Know If It’s Right For You

Ketogenic Diet: 25 Proven Benefits And How To Know If It’s Right For You

The ketogenic diet has been touted for its many health benefits such as weight loss, cognitive function, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In this post, we cover: Different ways to get into ketosis Physiology and pathways that are changed when you are in ketosis, which explains how the ketogenic diet derives its benefits Genetic factors that may affect the safety and effectiveness of ketosis 17 Health conditions that may be helped by the ketogenic diet Negative effects of ketosis and how to mitigate them Ketogenic Diets Improve Cognitive Function and Brain Health Ketogenic Diet as a Cancer Treatment Ketogenic diets are defined by a low carbohydrate (typically under 50 grams/day) and high fat intake, leading to an elevation of free fatty acids and ketone bodies in the blood (R). The first ketogenic diets in the medical literature are noted in publications in the 1920s, although wider popularity and increased research was not seen in medical literature until the 1960s (R). Variations of the diets have remained popular for the past 20-30 years, with proponents claiming that the diets boost weight loss and energy while offering protection from certain metabolic diseases (R). A ketogenic diet and fasting affect the body similarly. Both deplete the body’s glucose reserves, so the body starts turning fatty acids into ketones (R). When the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrates from food, it burns fat by producing ketones or ketone bodies (R, R). In non-diabetics, ketosis can be achieved in 3 ways, i.e. Fasting or severe caloric restriction (R) Prolonged physical exercise in fasted state, depending on intensity and duration (R, R2) Nutritional ketosis, i.e. by consuming a very low carbohydrate diet Supplementation, such as by supplementing with medium chain triglyceri Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets & Ketoacidosis

Low-carb Diets & Ketoacidosis

Drastically switching up your diet always carries the risk of side effects -- which is why it's important to talk to a doctor first -- but low-carb diets shouldn't cause ketoacidosis. This life-threatening condition, which develops when the blood becomes acidic, is generally only a risk for people with undiagnosed or poorly controlled type-1 diabetes. Low-carb diets actually put you in ketosis, a very mild form of ketoacidosis that does not carry the same life-threatening risk. Video of the Day Low-Carb Diets and Your Metabolism Reducing your carb intake can whittle your waist, and more restrictive low-carb diets speed up weight loss by affecting how your body generates energy. Normally, your body turns to carbs as the primary source of energy for your cells, and several tissues -- like your liver and muscles -- store carbs in the form of glycogen for almost-immediate energy. However, on a low-carb diet you're not getting enough carbs to replenish those glycogen stores, so your body turns to fat. It burns fatty acids -- the fat molecules that help make up your fat tissue -- to create ketone bodies, an alternate source of fuel. Because you're creating more ketone bodies for energy, you're burning more fat -- and losing weight. Low-Carb Diets Cause Dietary Ketosis Diets low enough in carbs to switch your primary fuel source over to ketone bodies are called ketogenic diets, and those that restrict your carb intake to 20 to 25 grams daily are typically low-carb enough to put you into ketosis. In addition to burning fat, ketogenic diets help you lose weight by controlling your appetite. One study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2008, found that men following a ketogenic diet ate less and reported feeling less hungry than dieters following a modera Continue reading >>

What Is Ketoacidosis? A Comprehensive Guide

What Is Ketoacidosis? A Comprehensive Guide

Ketoacidosis is lethal. It is responsible for over 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the US with a mortality rate of around 5%. In other words, ketoacidosis is to blame for about 5,000 deaths per year. The cause? A deadly combination of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased ketone body levels in the blood (more on this deadly combination later). Luckily, this lethal triad rarely affects individuals who don’t have diabetes. However, the majority (80%) of cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with a known history of diabetes mellitus (any form of diabetes). Ketoacidosis vs. Diabetic Ketoacidosis — What’s The Difference? At this point, you may have noticed that I used ketoacidosis and diabetic ketoacidosis interchangeably. This is because it is difficult for the body to get into a state of ketoacidosis without the blood sugar control issues that are common in people with diabetes. Hence, the term diabetic ketoacidosis. (However, there is another form of ketoacidosis called alcoholic ketoacidosis. This occurs in alcoholics who had a recent alcohol binge during a period of time when they didn’t eat enough.) Ketoacidosis tends to occur the most in people who have type 1 diabetes. Somewhere between 5 and 8 of every 1,000 people with type 1 diabetes develops diabetic ketoacidosis each year. Type 2 diabetics also run the risk of ketoacidosis under stressful situations, but it is much rarer because type 2 diabetics have some remaining insulin production (type 1 diabetics do not). If you are not part of the 422 million people worldwide that have diabetes, your risk of getting ketoacidosis is negligible. You would have to put yourself through years of stress, inactivity, and unhealthy eating habits before you experience ketoacidosis. ( Continue reading >>

Fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Fasting Ketosis And Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

INTRODUCTION Ketoacidosis is the term used for metabolic acidoses associated with an accumulation of ketone bodies. The most common cause of ketoacidosis is diabetic ketoacidosis. Two other causes are fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. Fasting ketosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis will be reviewed here. Issues related to diabetic ketoacidosis are discussed in detail elsewhere. (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Treatment".) PHYSIOLOGY OF KETONE BODIES There are three major ketone bodies, with the interrelationships shown in the figure (figure 1): Acetoacetic acid is the only true ketoacid. The more dominant acid in patients with ketoacidosis is beta-hydroxybutyric acid, which results from the reduction of acetoacetic acid by NADH. Beta-hydroxybutyric acid is a hydroxyacid, not a true ketoacid. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Ever since the discovery of the Atkins diet, low carb diets have been hugely popular amongst people of all ages, genders, shapes, and sizes. It wasn’t until the media decided to focus on them so much however, largely because many Hollywood celebrities were using them to drop body fat, increase lean muscle mass and build physiques to be proud of, that the general public began experimenting with them and trying them for themselves. In order for any low carb to be deemed as effective however, the body has to fall into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Ketosis is considered largely beneficial, but is also often confused for ketoacidiosis, which couldn’t be more different. Here we’ll be taking a look at what ketosis and ketoacidosis is, and exactly how and why they’re so different from one another. So, without any further hesitation, let’s get started. What is ketosis? – Ketosis naturally occurs when blood circulating throughout the body contains naturally high concentrations of ketones, or ketoacids. Ketosis occurs because of a change in the body’s natural pathways of energy creation. Normally, the body’s preferred energy source is glucose, which is a form of sugar. Glucose can naturally be absorbed via the diet, and it can also be synthesised from other forms of sugar. When we take away glucose, sugars, and food sources that the body can use to convert into glucose however, the body then falls into starvation mode because it literally has no energy. The body will begin to panic as it will fear it is starving and it will therefore begin looking elsewhere for other sources of energy. It will begin using stored body fat for energy once it falls into a state of ketosis. Ketosis is able to occur as a result of our livers actually burning body fat and using it Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood "villains" Of Human Metabolism

Go to: The Ketone Bodies are an Important Fuel The hormonal changes associated with a low carbohydrate diet include a reduction in the circulating levels of insulin along with increased levels of glucagon. This activates phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-biphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase and also inhibits pyruvate kinase, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase, and glucokinase. These changes indeed favor gluconeogenesis. However, the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis. In the liver in the well-fed state, acetyl CoA formed during the β-oxidation of fatty acids is oxidized to CO2 and H2O in the citric acid cycle. However, when the rate of mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue is accelerated, as, for example, during very low carbohydrate intake, the liver converts acetyl CoA into ketone bodies: Acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. The liver cannot utilize ketone bodies because it lacks the mitochondrial enzyme succinyl CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase required for activation of acetoacetate to acetoacetyl CoA [3]. Therefore, ketone bodies flow from the liver to extra-hepatic tissues (e.g., brain) for use as a fuel; this spares glucose metabolism via a mechanism similar to the sparing of glucose by oxidation of fatty acids as an alternative fuel. Indeed, the use of ketone bodies replaces most of the glucose required by the brain. Not all amino acid carbon will yield glucose; on average, 1.6 g of amino acids is required to synthesize 1 g of glucose [4]. Thus, to keep the brain supplied with glucose at rate of 110 to 120 g/day, the breakdown of 160 to 200 g of protein (close to 1 kg of muscle tissue) would be required. This is clearly undesirable, and the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

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