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Ketoacidosis Treatment At Home

Risks Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Risks Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

People suffering from diabetes could develop diabetic ketoacidosis. This serious complication develops from extremely low level or absence of insulin in the body. Usually type 1 diabetes patients have the greatest risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. If left untreated this health disorder could lead to severe health problems and in the worst case, it can even cause death. Diabetic ketoacidosis causes Sugar is the primarily fuel source of your body. Insulin helps the body cells to absorb the sugar. If the insulin level is low, the cells and tissues of your body will not be able to absorb the sugar. To sustain the body functions, your body will now look for an alternate source of energy. Your body will now increase secretion of hormones that break down fat to release energy. In this process of increased fat metabolism, toxins, known as ketones, are produced in the body. Rise in these toxic acids cause severe damage to the organs of the body. If diabetics on insulin treatment miss their insulin medications, the insulin level will drop, triggering diabetic ketoacidosis. Due to an ailment if your body produces excess hormones, such as adrenaline, these hormones will inhibit the activity of insulin, leading to diabetic ketoacidosis. This health disorder could also develop from alcoholism and drug abuse. Stress, trauma, stroke, heart attack, high fever and surgery could increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. People suffering from any form of diabetes – type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes could develop diabetic ketoacidosis any time. However, people with type 1 diabetes, who are below 19, have the greatest risk of developing this health problem. Diabetic ketoacidosis symptoms The symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis develop rapidly. You Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DK) occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar and organic acids called ketones. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. DK is a serious condition that can lead to diabetic coma or even death if left untreated. DK is associated with significant disturbances of the body’s chemistry, which can resolve with proper therapy. In Diabetic Ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). As the body produces stress response hormones unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency, the body begins to consume its own muscle, fat and liver cells into glucose and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. Ketones are acids that build up in the blood and appear in the urine when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. They are a warning sign that your diabetes is out of control or that you are getting sick. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Ketoacidosis may happen to anyone with diabetes and individuals with Type I need to take extra precautionary measures. But you can help prevent DK by learning the warning signs and checking your urine and blood regularly. Ketoacidosis usually develops slowly. But when vomiting occurs, this life-threatening condition can develop in a few hours. Early symptoms include the following: Thirst or a very dry mouth Frequent urination High blood glucose (sugar) levels High levels of ket Continue reading >>

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: diabetes medicines (such as in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. For the most part, DKA occurs in people with type 1 diabetes, but it can happen in folks with type 2 diabetes almost as often. DKA is the result of an inadequate amount of insulin. Insulin allows the body to use its major fuel source (glucose) for energy. Since glucose can no longer be burned, it reaches high levels in the bloodstream. This causes increased urine production and dehydration. About 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. When there is not enough insulin, the body burns fat instead. Fat breaks down into acids which in turn produce toxic acidic substances known as ketones. These build in the bloodstream causing a dangerous situation. Loss of potassium and other salts which the body needs in the excessive urination is also common. DKA is therefore a medical emergency which if untreated can result in coma and possibly death. In the early stages, it may be possible to treat DKA at home, but if it is more advanced, management should take place in a properly equipped setting such as a hospital. The keys to prevention of DKA include awareness of its warning signs along with frequent blood glucose monitoring and checking urine or blood ketone levels as needed. Causative factors The most common events that cause a person with diabetes to develop diabetic ketoacidosis are: Infection such as diarrhea, vomiting, and/or high fever (40%), Missed, inadequate, or “bad” insulin (25%), New diagnosis or previously unknown diabetes (15%). Various other causes: pregnancy, heart attack, stroke, trauma, stress, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and surgery. Approximately 5% to 10% of cases have no identifiable cause. Signs and Symptoms Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Acidosis is a biochemical condition, caused by acid-alkaline imbalance in the body's pH levels, where the acidity of the body fluid is very high. The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance of chemicals (acids and bases) in the body. All foods are digested in the body leaving ash as the result of the digestion. This food ash can be neutral, acid or alkaline, depending largely on the mineral composition of the foods. Some foods leave an acid residue, some alkaline. The acid ash results when there is a depletion of the alkali reserve in the blood and the tissues of the body. When the alkalinity of the blood is reduced, the ability to transport carbon dioxide is reduced. As a result, acid accumalates in the tissues. Acidosis can be classified into respiratory acidosis and metabolic acidosis. When the body is unable to remove carbon dioxide through breathing, it results in respiratory acidosis. Metabolic acidosis occurs when the kidney is not able to remove enough acid from the body. Metabolic acidosis has several types. Diabetic acidosis (Diabetic ketoacidosis) develops when ketone bodies which are acidic build up in the body. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused when too much sodium bicarbonate is lost from the body. Lactic acidosis occurs when there is a build up of lactic acid. Symptoms of Acidosis The general symptoms of acidosis are constant hunger, pain in the pharynx, nausea and vomitting, headaches, various nervous disorders and drowsiness. Chronic acidosis can lead to inflammation of the kidneys, rheumatism, artericlerosis, high BP, skin disorders and other degenerative diseases. It lowers immunity and vitality and makes us prone to the danger of other infections. Causes of Acodosis The main cause of acidosis is wrong diet choices. It mainly occurs because of too many Continue reading >>

How To Treat Ketoacidosis

How To Treat Ketoacidosis

Immediately drink a large amount of non-caloric or low caloric fluid. Continue to drink 8 to 12 oz. every 30 minutes. Diluted Gatorade, water with Nu-Salt™ and similar fluids are good because they help restore potassium lost because of high blood sugars. Take larger-than-normal correction boluses every 3 hours until the blood sugar is below 200 mg/dl (11 mmol) and ketones are negative. It will take much more rapid insulin than normal to bring blood sugars down when ketones are present in the urine or blood. Often, one and a half to two times the normal insulin dose for a high blood sugar will be necessary. Higher insulin doses than these will be needed if there is an infection or other major stress. If nausea becomes severe or last 4 hours or more, call your physician. If vomiting starts or you can no longer drink fluids, have a friend or family member call your physician immediately, then go directly to an emergency room for treatment. Never omit your insulin, even if you cannot eat. A reduced insulin dose might be needed, but only if your blood sugar is currently low. When high blood sugars or ketoacidosis happen, it is critical that you drink lots of fluid to prevent dehydration. Take extra amounts of Humalog, Novolog or Regular insulin to bring the blood sugars down. Children with severe ketoacidosis lose 10-15 % of their previous body weight (i.e., a 60 lb. child can lose 6 to 9 lbs. of weight) due to severe dehydration. Replacement of fluids should be monitored carefully. The dehydration is caused by excess urination due to high blood sugars and is quickly worsened when vomiting starts due to the ketoacidosis. The start of vomiting requires immediate attention at an ER or hospital where IV fluid replacement can begin. If only nausea is present and it is possible Continue reading >>

How To Spot And Treat Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

How To Spot And Treat Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Even if you work hard at your diabetes management and use technology to help keep your numbers in range, you can still experience high blood glucose, which can escalate to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While DKA can be scary if left untreated, it is preventable if you know what to look for and what to do. Senior District Clinical Manager, Melinda Turenne, BSN, RN, CDE, has more than 15 years of diabetes clinical experience. Today she shares some valuable DKA risk factors and prevention tips. Living with diabetes involves a lot of duties. You are checking your blood glucose (BG), counting your carbohydrates, exercising, and keeping doctors’ appointments. I am sure you remember your doctor or diabetes educator telling you to check for ketones too, right? Checking my what? One more thing to add to my to-do list! Yes, and here is WHY. What are ketones? Ketones are acid molecules produced when we burn fat for energy or fuel. As fat is broken down, ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are toxic and can make you very sick. When combined with dehydration, it can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), a life threatening condition. Why would DKA happen? DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin present in the body. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, causing high BG levels. Since the body is unable to use glucose without insulin for energy, it breaks down fat instead. This can occur for several reasons: Infection, injury, or serious illness A lack of insulin in the body due to missed injections, spoiled insulin, poor absorption Severe dehydration Combination of these things What are the signs of DKA? High BG levels Ketones (in blood and urine) Nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain (cramps) Confusion Tired, sluggish, or weak Flushed, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Herbal Remedies

Diabetic Herbal Remedies

While no cure for diabetes exists, diabetics can live a healthy life by controlling blood sugar levels. Traditional and effective methods of controlling blood sugar and managing diabetes include: Eating a healthy, controlled diet Getting plenty of exercise Monitoring blood glucose levels frequently Taking medication and using insulin if necessary. Along with conventional diabetes treatments and your doctor’s approval, you may complement your diabetes care with herbal diabetic treatment. Supplements for Diabetics Many supplements on the market claim to be diabetic herbal medicine. While some have significance, others are completely ineffective. Additionally, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn’t yet officially approved herbal supplements for diabetics. Nevertheless, some supplements for diabetics do have proven health benefits. While none of these should replace your current diabetic treatment, these supplements and diabetic herbal remedies may help you manage your diabetes: Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA): Alpha-lipoic acid may offer diabetics a double benefit by lowering blood sugar and easing nerve pain. A German study found that ALA improved insulin sensitivity by 27 percent, and other studies have shown improvement in burning, numbness and pain. Bitter melon: Bitter melon is a popular folk remedy for diabetes in Asia, Africa and South America. Bitter melon appears to have mild blood sugar-lowering properties due to many of its compounds, such as polypeptide-P (plant insulin). Possible side effects of this herbal diabetic treatment include gastrointestinal problems. Cinnamon: Cinnamon comes from the inner bark of a tropical evergreen tree and has insulin-like properties. This herbal diabetic treatment can help lower blood glucose levels as well as cholesterol and Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Treatment & Management

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Treatment of alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA) is directed toward reversing the 3 major pathophysiologic causes of the syndrome, which are: This goal can usually be achieved through the administration of dextrose and saline solutions. [4] Carbohydrate and fluid replacement reverse the pathophysiologic derangements that lead to AKA by increasing serum insulin levels and suppressing the release of glucagon and other counterregulatory hormones. Dextrose stimulates the oxidation of NADH and aids in normalizing the NADH/NAD+ ratio. Fluids alone do not correct AKA as quickly as do fluids and carbohydrates together. Indeed, evidence-based guidelines by Flannery et al, on the management of intensive care unit patients with a chronic alcohol disorder, including symptoms that mimic or mask Wernicke encephalopathy, recommend that in cases of suspected AKA, dextrose-containing fluids be used in place of normal saline during the first day of admission. [23] In alcoholics, thiamine (100 mg IV or IM) should be administered prior to any glucose-containing solutions. This will decrease the risk of precipitating Wernicke encephalopathy or Korsakoff syndrome. [13] Phosphate depletion is also common in alcoholics. The plasma phosphate concentration may be normal on admission; however, it typically falls to low levels with therapy as insulin drives phosphate into the cells. When present, severe hypophosphatemia may be associated with marked and possibly life-threatening complications, such as myocardial dysfunction, in these patients. Institute appropriate treatment for serious, coexisting, acute illnesses. These may include pancreatitis, hepatitis, heart failure, or infection. Prevention of AKA involves the treatment of chronic alcohol abuse. Transfer considerations Pati Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Causes Ketoacidosis is a complication that people with diabetes suffer from, and is caused due to the lack of insulin in the body. In ketoacidosis, there is a rapid build-up of toxic substances known as ‘ketones’ which makes the blood extremely acidic. Although it is most often observed in people who have type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis may affect those with type 2 diabetes as well. It is a serious condition, which if left untreated, can lead to a diabetic coma or even death. Risk factors Diabetics in general are prone to ketoacidosis due to the very nature of the disease. But, in the case of type 2 diabetics, a patient’s pancreas is unable to produce sufficient insulin which in turn deprives their cells of glucose. Since glucose is extremely essential for the cells to perform their normal functions, the patient’s body looks for alternative sources of energy. In an attempt to fulfil this deficit, the patient’s body uses fat from fat cells – which is broken down – to obtain energy. Denatured fat cells lead to the formation of ketones which are then released into the patient’s blood stream. Over a period of time, these ketones start to accumulate in the patient’s blood, causing it to turn more acidic. Because of this, many important enzymes that control the body’s metabolic processes aren’t able to perform optimally, leading to an imbalance in the patient’s blood sugar and electrolyte levels. (Read: Diabetes – Symptoms, causes, diagnosis, treatment and complications) Symptoms The common symptoms of ketoacidosis include – Diagnosis Ideally, a diabetic should not wait for symptoms to show up, and must be screened for risk factors regularly. Timely assessment of one’s health parameters can help prevent the onset of ketoacidosis. One could opt for Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic ketoacidosis definition and facts Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes (though rare, it can occur in people with type 2 diabetes) that occurs when the body produces high levels of ketones due to lack of insulin. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. The signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include Risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis are type 1 diabetes, and missing insulin doses frequently, or being exposed to a stressor requiring higher insulin doses (infection, etc). Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar (glucose) level, elevated blood ketones and acidity of the blood (acidosis). The treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis is insulin, fluids and electrolyte therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be prevented by taking insulin as prescribed and monitoring glucose and ketone levels. The prognosis for a person with diabetic ketoacidosis depends on the severity of the disease and the other underlying medical conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe and life-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the cells in our body do not receive the sugar (glucose) they need for energy. This happens while there is plenty of glucose in the bloodstream, but not enough insulin to help convert glucose for use in the cells. The body recognizes this and starts breaking down muscle and fat for energy. This breakdown produces ketones (also called fatty acids), which cause an imbalance in our electrolyte system leading to the ketoacidosis (a metabolic acidosis). The sugar that cannot be used because of the lack of insulin stays in the bloodstream (rather than going into the cell and provide energy). The kidneys filter some of the glucose (suga Continue reading >>

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