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Ketoacidosis Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can occur in diabetes. DKA happens when acidic substances, called ketones, build up in your body. Ketones are formed when your body burns fat for fuel instead of sugar, or glucose. That can happen if you don’t have enough insulin in your body to help you process sugars. Learn more: Ketosis vs. ketoacidosis: What you should know » Left untreated, ketones can build up to dangerous levels. DKA can occur in people who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but it’s rare in people with type 2 diabetes. DKA can also develop if you are at risk for diabetes, but have not received a formal diagnosis. It can be the first sign of type 1 diabetes. DKA is a medical emergency. Call your local emergency services immediately if you think you are experiencing DKA. Symptoms of DKA can appear quickly and may include: frequent urination extreme thirst high blood sugar levels high levels of ketones in the urine nausea or vomiting abdominal pain confusion fruity-smelling breath a flushed face fatigue rapid breathing dry mouth and skin It is important to make sure you consult with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms. If left untreated, DKA can lead to a coma or death. All people who use insulin should discuss the risk of DKA with their healthcare team, to make sure a plan is in place. If you think you are experiencing DKA, seek immediate medical help. Learn more: Blood glucose management: Checking for ketones » If you have type 1 diabetes, you should maintain a supply of home urine ketone tests. You can use these to test your ketone levels. A high ketone test result is a symptom of DKA. If you have type 1 diabetes and have a glucometer reading of over 250 milligrams per deciliter twice, you should test your urine for keton Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print If your doctor suspects diabetic ketoacidosis, he or she will do a physical exam and various blood tests. In some cases, additional tests may be needed to help determine what triggered the diabetic ketoacidosis. Blood tests Blood tests used in the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis will measure: Blood sugar level. If there isn't enough insulin in your body to allow sugar to enter your cells, your blood sugar level will rise (hyperglycemia). As your body breaks down fat and protein for energy, your blood sugar level will continue to rise. Ketone level. When your body breaks down fat and protein for energy, acids known as ketones enter your bloodstream. Blood acidity. If you have excess ketones in your blood, your blood will become acidic (acidosis). This can alter the normal function of organs throughout your body. Additional tests Your doctor may order tests to identify underlying health problems that might have contributed to diabetic ketoacidosis and to check for complications. Tests might include: Blood electrolyte tests Urinalysis Chest X-ray A recording of the electrical activity of the heart (electrocardiogram) Treatment If you're diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis, you might be treated in the emergency room or admitted to the hospital. Treatment usually involves: Fluid replacement. You'll receive fluids — either by mouth or through a vein (intravenously) — until you're rehydrated. The fluids will replace those you've lost through excessive urination, as well as help dilute the excess sugar in your blood. Electrolyte replacement. Electrolytes are minerals in your blood that carry an electric charge, such as sodium, potassium and chloride. The absence of insulin can lower the level of several electrolytes in your blood. You'll receive electrolytes throu Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Damian Baalmann, 2nd year EM resident A 45-year-old male presents to your emergency department with abdominal pain. He is conscious, lucid and as the nurses are hooking up the monitors, he explains to you that he began experiencing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting about 2 days ago. Exam reveals a poorly groomed male with dry mucous membranes, diffusely tender abdomen with voluntary guarding. He is tachycardic, tachypneic but normotensive. A quick review of the chart reveals a prolonged history of alcohol abuse and after some questioning, the patient admits to a recent binge. Pertinent labs reveal slightly elevated anion-gap metabolic acidosis, normal glucose, ethanol level of 0, normal lipase and no ketones in the urine. What are your next steps in management? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA): What is it? Ketones are a form of energy made by the liver by free fatty acids released by adipose tissues. Normally, ketones are in small quantity (<0.1 mmol/L), but sometimes the body is forced to increase its production of these ketones. Ketones are strong acids and when they accumulate in large numbers, their presence leads to an acidosis. In alcoholics, a combination or reduced nutrient intake, hepatic oxidation of ethanol, and dehydration can lead to ketoacidosis. Alcoholics tend to rely on ethanol for their nutrient intake and when the liver metabolizes ethanol it generates NADH. This NADH further promotes ketone formation in the liver. Furthermore, ethanol promotes diuresis which leads to dehydration and subsequently impairs ketone excretion in the urine. Alcoholic Ketoacidosis: How do I recognize it? Typical history involves a chronic alcohol abuser who went on a recent binge that was terminated by severe nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. These folk Continue reading >>

What Are The Treatments For Ketoacidosis In Dogs?

What Are The Treatments For Ketoacidosis In Dogs?

If your dog has diabetes mellitus, a common ailment in the canine realm, then diabetic ketoacidosis is a hazardous possibility. Ketoacidosis is a metabolic disorder that's related to extreme hyperglycemia. When diabetic dogs develop ketoacidosis, ketones, a type of acid, accumulate in their blood. Veterinary care is vital for dogs with this condition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Background When insufficient amounts of insulin bring upon the liver's inordinate manufacturing of ketoacids, ketoacidosis arises. Numerous factors can cause diabetic ketoacidosis in canines. The primary cause of the condition is reliance on insulin, although ketoacidosis is also linked to things such as urinary tract infections and skin infections. Dogs frequently experience diabetic ketoacidosis when their diabetes mellitus hasn't yet been identified or managed. Key Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms If you notice any unusual symptoms in your diabetic pet, get him to the veterinarian for treatment immediately. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an urgent condition. Common symptoms of the ailment are throwing up, nausea, appetite loss, dandruff, fatigue, feebleness, dehydration, fast breathing, depression, decreased body temperature, frequent urination, inordinate thirst, weight loss and unusual-smelling breath: If your dog's breath has an odor that's reminiscent of nail polish remover, diabetic ketoacidosis could be the culprit. Since diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency in dogs, immediate care is of the essence, no matter the time of day or night. If you notice these symptoms in your pet overnight, take him to a 24-hour veterinary hospital. Female dogs are particularly susceptible to the condition, as are elderly dogs. Treatment Options Some dogs with diabetic ketoacidosis need hospitalization, others do Continue reading >>

Severe Ketoacidosis Associated With Canagliflozin (invokana): A Safety Concern

Severe Ketoacidosis Associated With Canagliflozin (invokana): A Safety Concern

Case Reports in Critical Care Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1656182, 3 pages 1Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Providence Hospital and Medical Center, 16001 W 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075, USA 2Department of Internal Medicine, Providence Hospital and Medical Center, 16001 W 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075, USA Academic Editor: Kurt Lenz Copyright © 2016 Alehegn Gelaye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Canagliflozin (Invokana) is a selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor that was first introduced in 2013 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Though not FDA approved yet, its use in type 1 DM has been justified by the fact that its mechanism of action is independent of insulin secretion or action. However, some serious side effects, including severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), have been reported. Prompt identification of the causal association and initiation of appropriate therapy should be instituted for this life threatening condition. 1. Introduction More than 5 million patients are admitted annually to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A number of life threatening medical conditions, including diabetic ketoacidosis, can be associated with metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis may also arise from several drugs and toxins through a variety of mechanisms. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that Sodium Glucose Transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, including canagliflozin, may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis [1]. We pre Continue reading >>

Low-dose Insulin In The Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Low-dose Insulin In The Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Severe diabetic ketoacidosis remains a lethal condition. Many deaths occur during therapy and are avoidable. Treatment includes rehydration, administration of insulin and potassium, and clinical care. For many years very large doses of insulin were used. Recently, it has been suggested that such large doses are unnecessary and lead to undue hypokalemia, hypoglycemia, and osmotic disequilibria. Many studies are now available that show that low doses of insulin given as continuous intravenous infusions (4 to 10 units/hr) or as hourly intramuscular injections (20 units initially, then 5 units/ hr) are as effective as large doses in treating severe ketoacidosis. The new regimens are simple to use, predictable, and safe. Potassium shifts are less than with large insulin doses and insulin resistance has been shown to be a relatively minor problem. The new regimens are particularly suitable for use in nonspecialist centers. (Arch Intern Med 137:1367-1376, 1977) Continue reading >>

Original Contribution Utility Of Initial Bolus Insulin In The Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Original Contribution Utility Of Initial Bolus Insulin In The Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Current guidelines for treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) recommend administration of an intravenous bolus dose of insulin followed by a continuous infusion. This study was designed to investigate whether the initial bolus dose is of significant benefit to adult patients with DKA and if it is associated with increased complications. This was a non-concurrent, prospective observational cohort study of adult patients who presented with DKA in a 12-month period. Charts were divided into two groups depending on whether they received an initial bolus dose of insulin. Data on glucose levels, anion gap (AG), intravenous fluid administration (IVF), and length of stay (LOS) were collected. Primary outcome was hypoglycemia (need for administration of 50% dextrose). Of 157 charts, 78 received a bolus of insulin and were designated the treatment group, the remaining 79 formed the control group. Groups were similar at baseline and received equivalent IVF and insulin drips. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of hypoglycemia (6% vs. 1%, respectively, p = 0.12), rate of change of glucose (60 vs. 56 mg/dL/h, respectively, p = 0.54) or AG (1.9 vs. 1.9 mEq/L/h, respectively, p = 0.66), LOS in the Emergency Department (8 vs. 7 h, respectively, p = 0.37) or hospital (5.6 vs. 5.9 days, p = 0.81). Equivalence testing revealed no clinically relevant differences in IVF change, rate of change of glucose, or AG. Administration of an initial bolus dose of insulin was not associated with significant benefit to patients with DKA and demonstrated equivalent changes in clinically relevant endpoints when compared to patients not administered the bolus. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Treatment In The Intensive Care Unit Or General Medical/surgical Ward?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Treatment In The Intensive Care Unit Or General Medical/surgical Ward?

Go to: INTRODUCTION Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have health care costs 2.3 times higher than others without this diagnosis[1]. In a prevalence-based study, by the American Diabetes Association, in the United States in 2012, the total cost for diagnosed DM was $245 billion United States dollars, and of it, $176 billion was used for direct medical care costs[1]. In addition, and even more concerning, is the fact that hospitalizations for patients with DM have being increasing[2]. The National Surveillance of Diabetes Public Health Resources, reported that diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) admissions increased from 80000/year in 1988 to 140000/year in 2009[2]. DKA causes an acute metabolic disorder, which is primarily characterized by an increased presence of circulating ketone bodies, and the development of severe ketoacidosis in the presence of prolonged uncontrolled hyperglycemia, usually due to insulin deficiency[3]. It is more commonly seen in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), especially among children and young adults. Occasionally, patients with insulin resistant DM can present this complication; especially those that are noncompliant with insulin therapy or who present severe infection[3]. DKA has arbitrarily been classified by some as mild, moderate and severe, according to the initial diagnostic criteria (which includes plasma glucose, arterial pH, serum bicarbonate, urine and serum ketones, serum osmolality and anion gap; and the alteration in the mental status)[4]. Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Ketoacidosis

How To Treat Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1 Call emergency services. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening condition. If you are experiencing symptoms like your blood sugar not lowering, you should immediately call emergency services or visit the emergency room.[2] Symptoms that require you to call emergency services include severe nausea, being nauseous for four or more hours, vomiting, being unable to keep fluids down, inability to get your blood sugar levels down, or high levels of ketones in your urine.[3] Leaving DKA untreated can lead to irreparable damage and even death. It is important to seek medical care as soon as you suspect you are having a problem. 2 Stay in the hospital. Ketoacidosis is usually treated in the hospital. You may be admitted to a regular room or treated in ICU depending on the severity of your symptoms. During the first hours you are there, the doctors will work on getting your fluids and electrolytes balanced, then they will focus on other symptoms. Most of the time, patients remain in the hospital until they are ready to return to their normal insulin regimen.[4] The doctor will monitor you for any other conditions that may cause complications, like infection, heart attack, brain problems, sepsis, or blood clots in deep veins. 3 Increase your fluid intake. One of the first things that will be done to treat your diabetic ketoacidosis is to replace fluids. This can be in the hospital, a doctor’s office, or home. If you are receiving medical care, they will give you an IV. At home, you can drink fluids by mouth.[6] Fluids are lost through frequent urination and must be replaced. Replacing fluids helps balance out the sugar levels in your blood. 4 Replace your electrolytes. Electrolytes, such as sodium, potassium, and chloride, are important to keep your body functioning p Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State In Adults: Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State In Adults: Treatment

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS, also known as hyperosmotic hyperglycemic nonketotic state [HHNK]) are two of the most serious acute complications of diabetes. They are part of the spectrum of hyperglycemia, and each represents an extreme in the spectrum. The treatment of DKA and HHS in adults will be reviewed here. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis of these disorders are discussed separately. DKA in children is also reviewed separately. (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis".) (See "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Clinical features, evaluation, and diagnosis".) Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Insulin-resistant Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Insulin-like Growth Factor I In An Adolescent With Insulin-dependent Diabetes

Treatment Of Insulin-resistant Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Insulin-like Growth Factor I In An Adolescent With Insulin-dependent Diabetes

INSULIN plays a central part in the regulation of carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism. Severe insulin resistance, in which treatment with large doses of insulin does not result in adequate metabolic control, is uncommon. Such resistance occurs in the presence of circulating insulin or insulin-receptor antibodies,1 , 2 insulin-receptor abnormalities,3 and episodically in patients with previously typical insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).4 The therapeutic options in patients with severe insulin resistance have been limited, since insulin has been the only available hormone with insulin-like metabolic effects. Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), which shares considerable sequence homology as well as biologic properties with insulin,5 has recently become available and has been used in treating patients with Mendenhall's syndrome.6 We describe the use of IGF-I in the treatment of a 16-year-old girl with IDDM complicated by severe episodic insulin resistance. Administration of massive doses of insulin (more than 1000 U per hour) during these episodes failed to achieve glycemic control or reverse ketoacidosis. Treatment with IGF-I rapidly reversed the hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis, and subsequent weekly intravenous infusions of IGF-I markedly improved the degree of insulin sensitivity. The patient was a 16-year-old girl who had had IDDM since the age of 3. She was treated with twice-daily injections of regular and bovine or porcine isophane insulin suspension until the age of seven, at which time she began to receive human insulin. Her glycemic control subsequently improved. At the age of 13, she began to have increasingly frequent (two to three times monthly) episodes of severe hyperglycemia, usually without ketoacidosis. Her serum glucose Continue reading >>

Treatment And Complications Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Treatment And Complications Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), with a case fatality rate ranging from 0.15 percent to 0.31 percent [1-3]. DKA also can occur in children with type 2 DM (T2DM); this presentation is most common among youth of African-American descent [4-8]. (See "Classification of diabetes mellitus and genetic diabetic syndromes".) The management of DKA in children will be reviewed here (table 1). There is limited experience in the management and outcomes of DKA in children with T2DM, although the same principles should apply. The clinical manifestations and diagnosis of DKA in children and the pathogenesis of DKA are discussed elsewhere. (See "Clinical features and diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis in children and adolescents" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis".) DEFINITION Diabetic ketoacidosis – A consensus statement from the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) in 2014 defined the following biochemical criteria for the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) [9]: Hyperglycemia – Blood glucose of >200 mg/dL (11 mmol/L) AND Metabolic acidosis – Venous pH <7.3 or a plasma bicarbonate <15 mEq/L (15 mmol/L) AND Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a buildup of acids in your blood. It can happen when your blood sugar is too high for too long. It could be life-threatening, but it usually takes many hours to become that serious. You can treat it and prevent it, too. It usually happens because your body doesn't have enough insulin. Your cells can't use the sugar in your blood for energy, so they use fat for fuel instead. Burning fat makes acids called ketones and, if the process goes on for a while, they could build up in your blood. That excess can change the chemical balance of your blood and throw off your entire system. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for ketoacidosis, since their bodies don't make any insulin. Your ketones can also go up when you miss a meal, you're sick or stressed, or you have an insulin reaction. DKA can happen to people with type 2 diabetes, but it's rare. If you have type 2, especially when you're older, you're more likely to have a condition with some similar symptoms called HHNS (hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome). It can lead to severe dehydration. Test your ketones when your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dL or you have symptoms of high blood sugar, such as dry mouth, feeling really thirsty, or peeing a lot. You can check your levels with a urine test strip. Some glucose meters measure ketones, too. Try to bring your blood sugar down, and check your ketones again in 30 minutes. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if that doesn't work, if you have any of the symptoms below and your ketones aren't normal, or if you have more than one symptom. You've been throwing up for more than 2 hours. You feel queasy or your belly hurts. Your breath smells fruity. You're tired, confused, or woozy. You're having a hard time breathing. Continue reading >>

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