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Ketoacidosis Symptoms Anorexia

's Experience With Ketoacidosis.

's Experience With Ketoacidosis.

Signs Treatment Zama's experience Diabetic ketoacidosis is caused by a lack of insulin or an insufficient amount of insulin. Since the lack of insulin means that glucose in not able to be used, the body searches for a new source of energy. In this condition, the diabetic breaks down body fat (lipolysis) to use as energy. During lipolysis, waste products called ketones are produced. Ketones are eliminated in the urine and through the lungs. Under normal conditions, the body can tolerate and eliminate ketones. But in diabetic ketoacidosis, fats are being broken down at such a high rate that the body can not eliminate the ketones fast enough and they build up in the blood. In high amounts, ketones are toxic to the body. They cause the acid-base balance to change and serious electrolyte and fluid imbalances result. Some of the signs of ketoacidosis include polyuria polydipsia lethargy anorexia weakness vomiting dehydration There will probably be ketones in the urine (ketonuria) The breath may have a sweet chemical smell similar to nail polish remover. However, some owners have said that even during documented ketoacidosis, their pet's breath did NOT have any unusual odor. Treatment Mildly ketoacidotic animals can be alert and well hydrated. After your pet is stabilized, your pet can return home and be treated with proper diabetes management techniques including insulin therapy, diet, and exercise. "Sick" ketoacidotic animals require intensive medical management in the vet hospital. This is a life-threatening emergency that requires complex medical management and monitoring. It may take several days for the animal to be out of danger. Treatment involves injections of regular insulin, intravenous fluids, electrolytes, and frequent monitoring of blood glucose, blood chemistry, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Anxiety, Blackouts (memory Time Loss), Blurred Vision And Compulsive Behavior

Anxiety, Blackouts (memory Time Loss), Blurred Vision And Compulsive Behavior

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms anxiety, blackouts (memory time loss), blurred vision and compulsive behavior including Epilepsy (complex partial seizures), Generalized anxiety disorder, and Diabetes, type 2. There are 53 conditions associated with anxiety, blackouts (memory time loss), blurred vision and compulsive behavior. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Epilepsy (complex partial seizures) During complex partial seizures, people lose consciousness briefly. Generalized anxiety disorder Generalized anxiety disorder is a condition in which a person has nearly constant anxiety. Diabetes, type 2 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke) Transient ischemic attacks cause headache, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, and more. Epilepsy (simple partial seizures) During simple partial epileptic seizures, people remain fully conscious, able to respond to external stimuli. Short-acting sedative use The symptoms of short-acting sedatives include drowsiness, vertigo, muscle weakness, double vision, and more. Excessive caffeine use Excessive caffeine use can cause irritability, difficulty sleeping, anger, depression, and fatigue. Eye injury There are many types of eye injury, and symptoms include eye pain, burning, irritation, bleeding, and more. Nearsightedness Nearsightedness is a common eye problem that causes blurry, distant vision. Panic attack When someone has a panic attack, that person feels a sudden Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Eating Disorders - The Worst Of Both Worlds

Type 1 Diabetes And Eating Disorders - The Worst Of Both Worlds

When our children are tiny, we sometimes feel helpless - perhaps at 4am when they're crying inconsolably or have been coughing for hours. But at least we know exactly what's going on, because we're in charge of every aspect of their lives. How much harder it is when our children are no longer entirely dependent and we have to rely on them to make the right choices. Type 1 diabetes affects about one in 300 people in the UK . It is, in many ways, a very different condition from type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of diabetes among people in the UK. Whether or not you get type 1 diabetes is nothing to do with your weight or your lifestyle. It's thought to be an autoimmune disease - your immune system, which normally fights off infection, turns on your own body and attacks part of the pancreas, which produces insulin. The most common theory for type 1 diabetes is that the autoimmune process is triggered by a viral infection, and this often happens in childhood or young adulthood. Going through all the hormonal and emotional changes of adolescence is hard at the best of times, but adding the challenge of dealing with type 1 diabetes makes it more challenging still. Among the many stresses of being a teenager (particularly, but not exclusively, a girl) is the pressure to be thin and attractive. About one in 5,000 Britons is diagnosed every year with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa but it affects up to one in 20 teenagers, and ten times more girls than boys. Thousands of newspaper columns are devoted to arguing about what's to blame - the obsession with appearance in the media and all those images of stick-thin models; the cruel gossip column stories about celebrities who are looking 'chunky' because they've gone up from a size 8 to a size 12; or the pressure t Continue reading >>

Dying To Be Thin: The Long Term Health Risks Of Anorexia

Dying To Be Thin: The Long Term Health Risks Of Anorexia

How the Complications That Accompany Anorexia Attack the Body Anorexia Nervosa’s impact on a person’s health can be brutal. Even before the physical effects of this eating disorder become apparent, it begins to attack nearly every system in the human body. Like an aggressive form of cancer, it won’t stop until it wins. The disease has the highest mortality rate of all mental health disorders. As many as 20 percent of the people who suffer from anorexia will eventually die from it. And the longer a person suffers from anorexia, the greater their risk of dying becomes. Because some of the complications that come with anorexia can last a lifetime, the timeline for detection, intervention, and treatment can be crucial for recovery. The Complications of Anorexia Anorexia Nervosa is taken very seriously in the mental health community because the damage it inflicts extends to nearly every part of the body. These effects can range from minor infections and poor general health to serious life threatening medical problems. Because it often strikes young people, some of these conditions may carry over into adulthood and last an entire lifetime. “A lot of people -parents, and even some doctors- think that medical complications of anorexia only happen when you’re so thin you’re wasting away,” Rebecka Peebles, MD, a specialist in adolescent medicine at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, told WebMD: “Practitioners need to understand that a good therapist is only part of the treatment for anorexia and other eating disorders, and that these patients need treatment from a medical doctor as well.” Psychological Effects Adolescents and teens with anorexia have a high risk for other mental disorders such as anxiety and depression. Patients who suffer from anorexia a Continue reading >>

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Genetic Welfare Problems Of Companion Animals

Poodle (all types) Diabetes Mellitus Related terms: Canine diabetes mellitus, DM, Diabetic Ketoacidosis VeNom term: Diabetes mellitus (VeNom code: 658). Related conditions: Cataract, Pancreatitis, Hyperadrenocorticism Outline: Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder that occurs when there is a failure to adequately control blood sugar levels. Dogs that have the condition are unable to use blood sugar as an energy source for the cells in their body as they would normally, and therefore the level of sugar in the blood increases. The most common signs of diabetes mellitus are excessive thirst and urination with weight loss. The onset of diabetes mellitus occurs most commonly in middle aged or older dogs. Left untreated, diabetes mellitus can lead to complications including a severe illness called diabetic ketoacidosis where the body begins to break down body tissue, such as fats and muscle, to use as a source of energy in place of blood sugars. This process produces toxins that can cause dehydration, nausea and vomiting and can be life-threatening if left untreated. Diabetic dogs are generally reliant on dietary management and daily injections of the hormone insulin for the rest of their lives. There is evidence of a genetic basis for the development of diabetes mellitus, and Poodles have been shown to be at increased risk of the condition compared with the general dog population. Summary of Information (for more information click on the links below) 1. Brief description Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder which results in high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Glucose is an important source of energy in the body. In animals that are diabetic, the cells in the body are unable to absorb glucose properly, and this leads to an increase in the blood. In dogs, the m Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print If your doctor suspects that you have anorexia nervosa, he or she will typically run several tests and exams to help pinpoint a diagnosis, rule out medical causes for the weight loss, and check for any related complications. These exams and tests generally include: Physical exam. This may include measuring your height and weight; checking your vital signs, such as heart rate, blood pressure and temperature; checking your skin and nails for problems; listening to your heart and lungs; and examining your abdomen. Lab tests. These may include a complete blood count (CBC) and more specialized blood tests to check electrolytes and protein as well as functioning of your liver, kidney and thyroid. A urinalysis also may be done. Psychological evaluation. A doctor or mental health provider will likely ask about your thoughts, feelings and eating habits. You may also be asked to complete psychological self-assessment questionnaires. Other studies. X-rays may be taken to check your bone density, check for stress fractures or broken bones, or check for pneumonia or heart problems. Electrocardiograms may be done to look for heart irregularities. Testing may also be done to determine how much energy your body uses, which can help in planning nutritional requirements. Diagnostic criteria for anorexia The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), published by the American Psychiatric Association, is used by mental health providers to diagnose mental conditions and by insurance companies to reimburse for treatment. DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for anorexia include: Restricting food intake — eating less than needed to maintain a body weight that's at or above the minimum normal weight for your age and height Fear of gaining weight — intense fear of gaining wei Continue reading >>

Eating Disorders/

Eating Disorders/"diabulimia" In Type 1 Diabetes

Women with type 1 diabetes are more than twice as likely to develop an eating disorder than age-matched women without diabetes. Eating disorders in type 1 diabetes such as "diabulimia," as it is known in the popular press, represent some of the most complex patient problems—both medically and psychologically. Women with eating disorders and diabetes typically struggle with symptoms similar to those of women with eating disorders who do not have diabetes. However, they exhibit a very dangerous symptom of calorie purging in the form of insulin restriction. This condition is characterized by weight and body image concerns that lead to the mismanagement of diabetes. Recognize eating disorders in diabetes Warning signs may include: unexplained elevations in A1C values repeated problems with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can be fatal extreme concerns about weight and body shape change in eating patterns unusual patterns of intense exercise (sometimes associated with frequent hypoglycemia) amenorrhea (skipping monthly menstrual periods) Understand the medical risks associated with eating disorders and diabetes higher A1C levels higher risk of developing infections more frequent episodes of DKA more frequent hospital and emergency room visits higher rates and earlier onset of diabetes complications - nerve damage, eye disease, kidney disease and possible heart disease The cycle of "diabulimia" The cycle of negative feelings about body image, shape, and weight; chronically elevated blood glucose levels; depression, anxiety, and shame; and poor diabetes self-care and insulin restriction is difficult to treat: Given the extent of the problem among women with diabetes and the severe medical risks associated with it, further research aimed at targeted and effective treatments Continue reading >>

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DHPC agreed by CHMP on 25 February 2016 *JARDIANCE and SYNJARDY are co-promoted by Boehringer Ingelheim Limited and Eli Lilly and Company Limited Direct Healthcare Professional Communication Updated advice on the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors (INVOKANA▼ (canagliflozin), VOKANAMET▼ (canagliflozin / metformin), FORXIGA▼ (dapagliflozin), XIGDUO▼ (dapagliflozin / metformin), JARDIANCE▼* (empagliflozin), SYNJARDY▼* (empagliflozin / metformin)) Dear Healthcare Professional, In agreement with the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA), Janssen-Cilag Limited, AstraZeneca Limited and Boehringer Ingelheim Limited would like to inform you of the latest recommendations regarding the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin or empagliflozin). This follows on the outcome of an evaluation by the EMA of the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis during treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors. Rare but serious, sometimes life-threatening and fatal cases of diabetic ketoacidosis have been reported in patients on SGLT2 inhibitor treatment for type 2 diabetes. In a number of these reports, the presentation of the condition was atypical with only moderately increased blood glucose levels observed. Such atypical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with diabetes could delay diagnosis and treatment. Summary of updated advice • The risk of diabetic ketoacidosis must be considered in the event of non-specific symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, anorexia, abdominal pain, excessive thirst, difficulty breathing, confusion, unusual fatigue or sleepiness. Prescribers should inform patients of signs and symptoms of metabol Continue reading >>

Eating Disorders In Type 1 Diabetes: Risks And Recommendations

Eating Disorders In Type 1 Diabetes: Risks And Recommendations

Girls and women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) are almost 2.5 times as likely to develop an eating disorder as those without diabetes(1). In order to understand why this might be, one must first understand the complexity of T1DM and the unique symptom of insulin restriction. Recently, this phenomenon has been referred to as “diabulimia” in both the popular press and by those who are struggling themselves. I have a love-hate relationship with the term. My love comes from the knowledge that having a name has given women who struggle an actual voice. They have something to call it and something to describe. Also, if something has a name, then they can’t be the only ones with the problem. This awareness is a huge step forward as it brings with it the possibility of decreasing shame and possible secrecy. My hate, which is too strong a word, comes from several angles. First, the “bulimia” part of the word runs the risk of implying that only people who binge have this problem. What I’ve seen in my practice is that eating disorders of all kinds occur in the context of T1DM. I think of them as falling on a continuum—people can exclusively restrict food and calories, they can restrict both food and insulin, they can eat normally and restrict insulin, they can binge and restrict insulin, they can use other means of purging, or they can binge without purging. This leads to my second problem with the term, which is that it seems to oversimplify the problem taking all these nuances and fitting them into one entity. The reality is that all eating disorders in the context of T1DM are complex, tormenting, and dangerous and all deserve access to appropriate treatment. With that said, the remainder of this article will focus on the problem of insulin restriction, since up to 30 Continue reading >>

Can Anorexia Nervosa Cause Bad Breath (halitosis)?

Can Anorexia Nervosa Cause Bad Breath (halitosis)?

The easy cases of bad breath can be fixed by brushing and flossing. Drink lots of water. Use mouthwash and remember to brush your tongue too. But there are other things that can cause bad breath. Smoking is an obvious culprit. Foods like garlic and onions can cause bad breath long after you brush them out of your mouth. Dry mouth can cause bad breath, drinking plenty of water helps, as does chewing gum. Some illnesses and medicines may also cause bad breath, and plaque or tartar on teeth and gum disease may also contribute. Continue reading >>

How To Identify Ketosis

How To Identify Ketosis

Expert Reviewed Ketosis is a normal metabolic process by which your body breaks down stored fat for energy, which can also result in a dangerous buildup of ketones in the body called ketoacidosis.[1] Ketosis is often the product of a low-carbohydrate diet that people use to lose weight and gain muscle or it can also be a product of malnutrition. Although the long-term risks of ketosis are not clear, there is some evidence that it can increase your risk of heart disease and certain cancers.[2] By recognizing the signs of ketosis, you can help minimize your risk for developing ketoacidosis.[3] Continue reading >>

Eating Disorders Signs And Symptoms

Eating Disorders Signs And Symptoms

Although eating disorders are most common among female adolescents and young adults, they can affect any age, or gender. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, 20 million women and 10 million men will suffer from an eating disorder in their lifetime. There are several different types of eating disorders including, Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating disorder, etc. Although each is unique and characterized by different symptoms, they are all associated with extreme emotions, beliefs, and behaviors related to weight and food. Anorexia Nervosa: 90-95% of individuals with Anorexia Nervosa are female, and it is one of the most common mental health diagnoses in young women. Most individuals with this illness fail to recognize the seriousness of the illness. Health consequences include dehydration, muscle loss, overall weakness, abnormally low heart rate and blood pressure resulting in increased risk of heart failure, eventual loss of bone density, and possible kidney damage. Anorexia Nervosa can be life threating. The signs and symptoms include: Self-esteem issues related to body image Inadequate food intake and an extreme low body weight Extreme fear or anxiety of weight gain or becoming “fat” An obsession with weight, food, calories, and/or dieting Denial of hunger or consistent excuses to avoid meal times or situations involving food Purging (vomiting or laxative use) to further avoid weight loss may be accompanied with Anorexia. Bulimia Nervosa: Bulimia Nervosa affects 1-2% of adolescent girls and young women. Although most patients with Bulimia are female, 20% are male. Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa don’t appear extremely underweight, and often appear to be average weight. The constant cycle of binging (overeating) and purging (vo Continue reading >>

Cough & Poor Appetite Are Symptoms Of Which Disease?

Cough & Poor Appetite Are Symptoms Of Which Disease?

Cough, Decreased appetite, Fatigue and Weight loss (unintentional) There are 143 conditions associated with cough, decreased appetite, fatigue and weight loss (unintentional). The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Continue reading >>

Sglt 2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sglt 2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Following a review of the cases, EMA has recommended updating the product information of SGLT2 inhibitors to list diabetic ketoacidosis as a rare adverse reaction (affecting up to 1 in 1,000 patients). Patients taking these medicines should be aware of the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis, including rapid weight loss, nausea or vomiting, stomach pain, excessive thirst, fast and deep breathing, confusion, unusual sleepiness or tiredness, a sweet smell to the breath, a sweet or metallic taste in the mouth, or a different odour to urine or sweat. Patients should contact a doctor or the nearest hospital straightaway if they have any of these symptoms. Information for healthcare professionals Rare cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, including life-threatening ones, have occurred in patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors, used to treat type 2 diabetes. A number of these cases were atypical with patients having only moderately raised blood sugar levels and some of them occurred during off-label use and clinical trials in patients with type 1 diabetes Always consider the possibility of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients taking SGLT2 inhibitors who have non-specific symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, anorexia, abdominal pain, excessive thirst, difficulty breathing, confusion, unusual fatigue or sleepiness Inform patients of the signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis and advise them to seek medical advice immediately if they develop such signs and symptoms Stop treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors immediately if diabetic ketoacidosis is suspected or confirmed, and do not re-start treatment unless another clear precipitating factor for the condition is identified and resolved Stop treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors temporarily in patients undergoing major surgical procedures or hospitalised du Continue reading >>

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