diabetestalk.net

Ketoacidosis Pathophysiology

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Childhood Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of mortality in childhood diabetes.[1]The primary cause of DKA is absolute or relative insulin deficiency: Absolute - eg, previously undiagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus or a patient with known type 1 diabetes who does not take their insulin. Relative - stress causes a rise in counter-regulatory hormones with relative insulin deficiency. DKA can be fatal The usual causes of death are: Cerebral oedema - associated with 25% mortality (see 'Cerebral odedema', below). Hypokalaemia - which is preventable with good monitoring. Aspiration pneumonia - thus, use of a nasogastric tube in the semi-conscious or unconscious is advised. Deficiency of insulin. Rise in counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, and catecholamines. Thus, inappropriate gluconeogenesis and liver glycogenolysis occur compounding the hyperglycaemia, which causes hyperosmolarity and ensuing polyuria, dehydration and loss of electrolytes. Accelerated catabolism from lipolysis of adipose tissue leads to increased free fatty acid circulation, which on hepatic oxidation produces the ketone bodies (acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) that cause the metabolic acidosis. A vicious circle is usually set up as vomiting usually occurs compounding the stress and dehydration; the cycle can only be broken by providing insulin and fluids; otherwise, severe acidosis occurs and can be fatal. Biochemical criteria The biochemical criteria required for a diagnosis of DKA to be made are Continue reading >>

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Predictable, Detectable, And Preventable Safety Concern With Sglt2 Inhibitors

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Predictable, Detectable, And Preventable Safety Concern With Sglt2 Inhibitors

The Case At Hand Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Drug Safety Communication that warns of an increased risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with uncharacteristically mild to moderate glucose elevations (euglycemic DKA [euDKA]) associated with the use of all the approved sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors (1). This Communication was based on 20 clinical cases requiring hospitalization captured between March 2013 and June 2014 in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database. The scarce clinical data provided suggested that most of the DKA cases were reported in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), for whom this class of agents is indicated; most likely, however, they were insulin-treated patients, some with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The FDA also identified potential triggering factors such as intercurrent illness, reduced food and fluid intake, reduced insulin doses, and history of alcohol intake. The following month, at the request of the European Commission, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced on 12 June 2015 that the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee has started a review of all of the three approved SGLT2 inhibitors (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin) to evaluate the risk of DKA in T2D (2). The EMA announcement claimed that as of May 2015 a total of 101 cases of DKA have been reported worldwide in EudraVigilance in T2D patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors, with an estimated exposure over 0.5 million patient-years. No clinical details were provided except for the mention that “all cases were serious and some required hospitalisation. Although [DKA] is usually accompanied by high blood sugar levels, in a number of these reports blood sugar levels were only moderately increased” (2). Wit Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

GENERAL ketoacidosis is a high anion gap metabolic acidosis due to an excessive blood concentration of ketone bodies (keto-anions). ketone bodies (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetone) are released into the blood from the liver when hepatic lipid metabolism has changed to a state of increased ketogenesis. a relative or absolute insulin deficiency is present in all cases. CAUSES The three major types of ketosis are: (i) Starvation ketosis (ii) Alcoholic ketoacidosis (iii) Diabetic ketoacidosis STARVATION KETOSIS when hepatic glycogen stores are exhausted (eg after 12-24 hours of total fasting), the liver produces ketones to provide an energy substrate for peripheral tissues. ketoacidosis can appear after an overnight fast but it typically requires 3 to 14 days of starvation to reach maximal severity. typical keto-anion levels are only 1 to 2 mmol/l and this will usually not alter the anion gap. the acidosis even with quite prolonged fasting is only ever of mild to moderate severity with keto-anion levels up to a maximum of 3 to 5 mmol/l and plasma pH down to 7.3. ketone bodies also stimulate some insulin release from the islets. patients are usually not diabetic. ALCOHOLIC KETOSIS Presentation a chronic alcoholic who has a binge, then stops drinking and has little or no oral food intake for a few days (ethanol and fasting) volume depletion is common and this can result in increased levels of counter regulatory hormones (eg glucagon) levels of free fatty acids (FFA) can be high (eg up to 3.5mM) providing plenty of substrate for the altered hepatic lipid metabolism to produce plenty of ketoanions GI symptoms are common (eg nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, haematemesis, melaena) acidaemia may be severe (eg pH down to 7.0) plasma glucose may be depressed or normal or Continue reading >>

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

- [Voiceover] Oftentimes we think of diabetes mellitus as a chronic disease that causes serious complications over a long period of time if it's not treated properly. However, the acute complications of diabetes mellitus are often the most serious, and can be potentially even life threatening. Let's discuss one of the acute complications of diabetes, known as diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA for short, which can occur in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Now recall that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. And as such, there's an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas, which prevents the pancreas from producing and secreting insulin. Therefore, there is an absolute insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes. But what exactly does this mean for the body? To get a better understanding, let's think about insulin requirements as a balancing act with energy needs. Now the goal here is to keep the balance in balance. As the energy requirements of the body go up, insulin is needed to take the glucose out of the blood and store it throughout the body. Normally in individuals without type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin to keep up with any amount of energy requirement. But how does this change is someone has type 1 diabetes? Well since their pancreas cannot produces as much insulin, they have an absolute insulin deficiency. Now for day-to-day activities, this may not actually cause any problems, because the small amount of insulin that is produced is able to compensate and keep the balance in balance. However, over time, as type 1 diabetes worsens, and less insulin is able to be produced, then the balance becomes slightly unequal. And this results in the sub-acute or mild symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as fatigue, because the body isn Continue reading >>

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding The Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) must be considered while forming a differential diagnosis when assessing and managing a patient with an altered mental status. This is especially true if the patient has a history of diabetes mellitus (DM). However, be aware that the onset of DKA or HHNS may be the first sign of DM in a patient with no known history. Thus, it is imperative to obtain a blood glucose reading on any patient with an altered mental status, especially if the patient appears to be dehydrated, regardless of a positive or negative history of DM. In addition to the blood glucose reading, the history — particularly onset — and physical assessment findings will contribute to the formulation of a differential diagnosis and the appropriate emergency management of the patient. Pathophysiology of DKA The patient experiencing DKA presents significantly different from one who is hypoglycemic. This is due to the variation in the pathology of the condition. Like hypoglycemia, by understanding the basic pathophysiology of DKA, there is no need to memorize signs and symptoms in order to recognize and differentiate between hypoglycemia and DKA. Unlike hypoglycemia, where the insulin level is in excess and the blood glucose level is extremely low, DKA is associated with a relative or absolute insulin deficiency and a severely elevated blood glucose level, typically greater than 300 mg/dL. Due to the lack of insulin, tissue such as muscle, fat and the liver are unable to take up glucose. Even though the blood has an extremely elevated amount of circulating glucose, the cells are basically starving. Because the blood brain barrier does not require insulin for glucose to diffuse across, the brain cells are rece Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pathophysiology, Management And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pathophysiology, Management And Complications

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common and potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus, the second most common chronic childhood disease [1]. Prior to the introduction of insulin to clinical medicine by Banting and Best in 1922, DKA had a mortality rate greater than 60% [2]. As insulin was introduced into clinical practice, there was a gradual decrease in mortality associated with DKA over the subsequent 30 years. Recent epidemiological data reveal current mortality varies from 0 to 19% [3,4]. DKA continues to be the most common cause of death in patients younger than 24 years of age; it accounts for as many as 50% of deaths of young diabetic patients [5–7]. In elderly diabetics who have coexisting diseases, DKA carries a high mortality [8]. Despite many advances in the care of diabetic patients, the prevalence of DKA is not declining; it accounts for 14% of all diabetes-related hospital admissions [3, 4, 9]. The incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus continues to increase worldwide and has roughly doubled in each recent decade [10–13]. Because insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is increasing, and preventative measures to avoid DKA in diabetic patients have not been successful, the incidence of DKA can also be expected to increase in coming years. Prevention of DKA is the ultimate goal (80% of hospital admissions for DKA occur in treated diabetics) [3,8]. It is necessary for clinicians to understand the pathophysiology and treatment of DKA to care for this increasing diabetic population. We discuss the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis, its management, and its complications. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pathophysiology, Management And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Pathophysiology, Management And Complications

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common and potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus, the second most common chronic childhood disease [1]. Prior to the introduction of insulin to clinical medicine by Banting and Best in 1922, DKA had a mortality rate greater than 60% [2]. As insulin was introduced into clinical practice, there was a gradual decrease in mortality associated with DKA over the subsequent 30 years. Recent epidemiological data reveal current mortality varies from 0 to 19% [3,4]. DKA continues to be the most common cause of death in patients younger than 24 years of age; it accounts for as many as 50% of deaths of young diabetic patients [5–7]. In elderly diabetics who have coexisting diseases, DKA carries a high mortality [8]. Despite many advances in the care of diabetic patients, the prevalence of DKA is not declining; it accounts for 14% of all diabetes-related hospital admissions [3, 4, 9].The incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus continues to increase worldwide and has roughly doubled in each recent decade [10–13]. Because insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is increasing, and preventative measures to avoid DKA in diabetic patients have not been successful, the incidence of DKA can also be expected to increase in coming years. Prevention of DKA is the ultimate goal (80% of hospital admissions for DKA occur in treated diabetics) [3,8]. It is necessary for clinicians to understand the pathophysiology and treatment of DKA to care for this increasing diabetic population. We discuss the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis, its management, and its complications. Continue reading >>

Extreme Gestational Starvation Ketoacidosis: Case Report And Review Of Pathophysiology

Extreme Gestational Starvation Ketoacidosis: Case Report And Review Of Pathophysiology

A case of severe starvation ketoacidosis developing during pregnancy is presented. The insulinopenic/insulinresistant state found during fasting in late gestation predisposes to ketosis. Superimposition of stress hormones, which further augment lipolysis, exacerbates the degree of ketoacidosis. In our patient, gestational diabetes, twin pregnancies, preterm labor, and occult infection were factors that contributed to severe starvation ketoacidosis. Diagnosis was delayed because starvation ketosis is not generally considered to be a cause of severe acidosis, and because the anion gap was not elevated. Improved understanding of the complex fuel metabolism during pregnancy should aid in prevention, early recognition, and appropriate therapy of this condition. Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Pathophysiology

Ketoacidosis Pathophysiology

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious, life threatening condition - successful treatment requires attention to metabolic consequences. Ketone production In the normal animal free fatty acids (FFA) are released from adipose tissue in the process of lipolysis and are used as fuel or assimilated by the liver in the presence of reduced insulin concentrations and increased glucagon concentrations. They are used to build triglycerides, metabolized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle or converted to ketone bodies. In the face of a relative or absolute insulin deficiency the cells are unable to uptake and utilize glucose. Ketone bodies can be used by peripheral tissues and the liver as an alternative source of energy and are therefore life-saving in the short-term. Production is normally carefully controlled by a homeostatic mechanism. If this balance is disturbed a number of processes are activated which together produce a decompensated state which inevitably progresses towards death unless averting action is taken. As the rate of ketone body production begins to exceed the rate at which they can be used, ketonemia develops with associated acidosis. Once the concentration in the blood exceeds the renal threshold ketonuria Urinalysis: ketone develops and this provides an alternative mechanism for ketone removal from the body. Insulin antagonism Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is often associated with conditions which increase concentrations of diabetogenic hormones: Infection: increases concentrations of cortisol and glucagon. Congestive heart failure: increases concentrations of catecholamines and glucagon. Pyrexia: increases concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines, growth hormone and glucagons. Fasting During fasting the body mobilizes lipid Continue reading >>

25-40% Of Newly Diagnosed Cases Present In Dka

25-40% Of Newly Diagnosed Cases Present In Dka

Case Scenario #1 What is your assessment? DKA exists when: Venous pH < 7.3 Serum bicarbonate < 15 mEq/dL Blood glucose > 300 mg/dL Presence of ketonemia/ketonuria How much fluid would you administer as a bolus? Would you administer bicarbonate? How much insulin would you administer? What IVF would you start? At what rate? * 10 - 20 cc/kg bolus of NS would be adequate. Though the patient is dehydrated (dry lips), his hemodynamics are good, with acceptable vitals and good perfusion. There would be no reason to administer more than 20 cc/kg fluids. While this patient is clearly acidemic, he is NOT in impending cardiovascular collapse and therefore there is no justification for the administration of bicarbonate. In fact, administration of bicarbonate has been associated with the development of cerebral edema. The “true†serum sodium is 143 133 + 0.016[700-100] Insulin is generally started at 0.1 u/kg/hr. Therefore, in this 30 kg patient, an insulin infusion of 3 u/hr of regular insulin should be initiated. IVF of NS should be started at ~ 2400 cc/m2/day, which is approximately 1.5 x maintenance Continue reading >>

Pathophysiology Of Ketoacidosis In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Pathophysiology Of Ketoacidosis In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Abstract AIMS: Despite an increasing number of reports of ketoacidosis in populations with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, the pathophysiology of the ketoacidosis in these patients is unclear. We therefore tested the roles of three possible mechanisms: elevated stress hormones, increased free fatty acids (FFA), and suppressed insulin secretion. METHODS: Forty-six patients who presented to the Emergency Department with decompensated diabetes (serum glucose > 22.2 mmol/l and/or ketoacid concentrations > or = 5 mmol/l), had blood sampled prior to insulin therapy. Three groups of subjects were studied: ketosis-prone Type 2 diabetes (KPDM2, n = 13) with ketoacidosis, non-ketosis-prone subjects with Type 2 diabetes (DM2, n = 15), and ketotic Type 1 diabetes (n = 18). RESULTS: All three groups had similar mean plasma glucose concentrations. The degree of ketoacidosis (plasma ketoacids, bicarbonate and anion gap) in Type 1 and 2 subjects was similar. Mean levels of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine), and FFA were not significantly different in DM2 and KPDM2 patients. In contrast, plasma C-peptide concentrations were approximately three-fold lower in KPDM2 vs. non-ketotic DM2 subjects (P = 0.0001). Type 1 ketotic subjects had significantly higher growth hormone (P = 0.024) and FFA (P < 0.002) and lower glucagon levels (P < 0.02) than DM2. CONCLUSIONS: At the time of hospital presentation, the predominant mechanism for ketosis in KPDM2 is likely to be greater insulinopenia. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Chapter 220. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Chapter 220. Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. The incidence and prevalence of diabetes are rising; as of 2005, an estimated 7% of the U.S. population had diabetes. In patients age 60 or older, the prevalence is estimated to be 20.9%.1 DKA occurs predominately in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, but unprovoked DKA can occur in newly diagnosed type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, especially in blacks and Hispanics.2 Between 1993 and 2003, the yearly rate of ED visits for DKA per 10,000 U.S. population with diabetes was 64, with a trend toward an increased rate of visits among the black population compared with the white population.3 Europe has a comparable incidence. A better understanding of pathophysiology and an aggressive, uniform approach to diagnosis and management have reduced mortality to <5% of reported episodes in experienced centers.4 However, mortality is higher in the elderly due to underlying renal disease or coexisting infection and in the presence of coma or hypotension. DKA is a response to cellular starvation brought on by relative insulin deficiency and counterregulatory or catabolic hormone excess (Figure 220-1). Insulin is the only anabolic hormone produced by the endocrine pancreas and is responsible for the metabolism and storage of carbohydrates, fat, and protein. Counterregulatory hormones include glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. Complete or relative absence of insulin and the excess counterregulatory hormones result in hyperglycemia (due to excess production and underutilization of glucose), osmotic diuresis, prerenal azotemia, worsening hyperglycemia, ketone formation, and a wide-anion gap metabolic acidosis.4 Insulin deficiency. Patho Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

To the Editor of British Medical Journal In the Clinical Review “Diabetic ketoacidosis in adults”(1) there are discrepancies with the literature (including the authors' references). 1. In the paragraph “What is DKA?” the authors write “DKA is an extreme metabolic state caused by insulin deficiency”. Since the Nobel Prize was awarded 1977 to Rosalyn S Yalow for the development of new methods of biochemical analysis that make it possible to measure insulin concentration in human plasma, these methods have been used worldwide. In 1981, the monograph “Diabetic coma: ketoacidotic and hyperosmolar” (the authors' reference 1) was published and on page 67, Figure 6.3 has the names of 12 authors who have reported sufficient amounts of plasmatic insulin in patients with DKA. In contrast, absolute deficiency of plasmatic insulin has been reported in diabetic patients with hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome(2) as well as in diabetic patients on routine control without subjective complaints(3). Where are the published concrete reports on the deficiency of plasmatic insulin in patients with DKA? What is the “safe level” of plasmatic insulin concentration that makes development of DKA impossible? 2. In the paragraph “How does DKA present” the authors write “Typically, patients develop … an altered mental state, including coma” and in the paragraph “Bicarbonate” they write “Bicarbonate is not routinely recommended”. Without bicarbonate therapy, lethality of coma in DKA is up to 100% (e g, the authors reference 27 – Basu et al); if in the therapy is included also sodium bicarbonate, the lethality of coma is zero (e g (4)). Where are the published reports on zero lethality of coma in DKA without alkalising therapy? Dr. Viktor Rosival, PhD SYNLAB D Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abbas E. Kitabchi, PhD., MD., FACP, FACE Professor of Medicine & Molecular Sciences and Maston K. Callison Professor in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism UT Health Science Center, 920 Madison Ave., 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Aidar R. Gosmanov, M.D., Ph.D., D.M.Sc. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Avenue, Suite 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Clinical Recognition Omission of insulin and infection are the two most common precipitants of DKA. Non-compliance may account for up to 44% of DKA presentations; while infection is less frequently observed in DKA patients. Acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke, acute thrombosis) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing`s syndrome, hyperthyroidism) and impaired thermo-regulation or recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hormones, and worsening of peripheral insulin resistance. Medications such as diuretics, beta-blockers, corticosteroids, second-generation anti-psychotics, and/or anti-convulsants may affect carbohydrate metabolism and volume status and, therefore, could precipitateDKA. Other factors: psychological problems, eating disorders, insulin pump malfunction, and drug abuse. It is now recognized that new onset T2DM can manifest with DKA. These patients are obese, mostly African Americans or Hispanics and have undiagnosed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin action. A recent report suggests that cocaine abuse is an independent risk factor associated with DKA recurrence. Pathophysiology In Continue reading >>

More in ketosis