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Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology Breakdown

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar l Continue reading >>

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  1. tturko

    So I have just started to follow a Keto plan, I have no problem with cutting carbs down to 20 gr per day, no problem with the protein, but my concern is the required amount of fat and what if I don't take in the recommended 70%.......will I still hit ketosis? I am very encouraged with the sharing of personal experiences sharing of the knowledge on this forum....thanks for that!!! CHEERS!

  2. Fiorella

    Protein is insulinogenic. The point of being in ketosis with high fat is to get control of insulin rollercoasting up and down with your blood sugar. Fat helps to buffer the effect and keep insulin low and blood sugar level stable.

  3. brownfat

    If you sufficiently restrict carbs and protein then for ketosis it doesn't much matter how much fat you eat. Eat an amount of fat appropriate to your goal for losing, sustaining or gaining weight.

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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the spontaneous decomposition of acetoacetic acid. It is often described as smelling like fruit or nail polish remover. Ketosis may also smell, but the odor is usually more subtle due to lower concentrations of acetone. Treatment consists most simply of correcting blood sugar and insulin levels, which will halt ketone production. If the severity of the case warrants more aggressive measures, intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion can be given to raise blood pH back to an acceptable range. However, serious caution must be exercised with IV sodium bicarbonate to avoid the risk of equally life-threatening hypernatremia. Three common causes of ketoacidosis are alcohol, starvation, and diabetes, resulting in alcoholic ketoacidosis, starvation ketoacidosis, and diabetic ketoacidosis respectively. In diabetic ketoacidosis, a high concentration of ketone bodies is usually accompanied by insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and dehydration. Particularly in type 1 diabetics the lack of insulin in the bloodstream prevents glucose absorption, thereby inhibiting the production of oxaloacetate (a crucial molecule for processing Acetyl-CoA, the product of beta-oxidation of fatty acids, in the Krebs cycle) through reduced levels of pyruvate (a byproduct of glycolysis), and can cause unchecked ketone body production (through fatty acid metabolism) potentially leading to dangerous glucose and ketone levels in the blood. Hyperglycemia results in glucose overloading the kidneys and spilling into the urine (transport maximum for glucose is exceeded). Dehydration results following the osmotic movement of water into urine (Osmotic diuresis), exacerbating the acidosis. In alcoholic ketoacidosis, alcohol causes dehydration and blocks the first step of gluconeogenesis by depleting oxaloacetate. The body is unable to synthesize enough glucose to meet its needs, thus creating an energy crisis resulting in fatty acid metabolism, and ketone body formation.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Th Continue reading >>

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  1. CherryAA

    A quick note to report that having spent months with a maximum ketones reading of 0.5 and a calorie intake of 1250 on a ketogenic diet of under 30g carbs, during which time I lost 25kg then went into a 6 months stall, I am now recording ketones of 2.8 with a calorie intake of 1600 and weight is dropping off ( 5kg in a week ! )
    My 1600 calories is approximately 40g carbs, 70g proteins and the balance fats, mainly saturated and mono. with balanced is omega 3/6 I eat once per day only.
    The details are in my diet thread reference below if anyone is interested in checking it out.

  2. RedDragon1960

    Did my first Fast day had ketone reading of 1.2 yet this morning ketone dropped to 0.4 does anyone know why ??

  3. ringi

    How are you measuring your ketone?

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People always freak out when I tell them I am doing keto. I even have one friend that refers to my diet as "The Ketoacidosis Diet". I can't get him to understand the difference, but maybe this will help you! Find Me On Twitter: www.twitter.com/HeavyKevi Instagram: www.instagram.com/TheHeavyTruthTV Follow My Macros on MyFitnessPal @The HeavyTruth Facebook Group: Facebook.com/Groups/TheHeavyTruthTV Subscribe to my Essential Oils Channel: https://goo.gl/El053Q Send Questions or Testimonials By Mail: Kevin Gillem P.O.Box 291517 Phelan, CA 92329 My Favorite Low Carb Sweetener - http://amzn.to/2smCmDM I recommend Smackfat Ketone Strips - http://amzn.to/2laB9MG I use the Match DNA Milk Frother - http://amzn.to/2klHt4o I use NOW MCT Oil - http://amzn.to/2kOs48S I'm Kevin and I have used a Ketogenic diet, Intermittent Fasting and Extended Fasting to successfully lose 160 pounds and I am still shrinking. I hope to one day be half the man I was at 400 pounds. During this journey I have learned a lot about weight loss, Metabolic syndrome, Insulin Resistance, LCHF dieting and overall health in general. I am greatly interested in continuing to learn about health related topics and sharing what I learn with others so that all of our lives can be improved. Please like and subscribe to my channel so that I can share the things I learn that I think are important for all of our well being. I would also appreciate feedback from you all so I can share it with other subscribers and we can all grow as a community. I am not a doctor. I am not licensed. I do not hold any qualifications for giving medical advice. This is an account of my own experiences and does not apply to anyone else. All information, content, and material of this channel is for informational purposes only and are not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. If you have questions about your own personal situation it is recommended that you discuss them with your own licensed healthcare professional. If you think you are having an emergency, dial 911 immediately.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath od Continue reading >>

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  1. Nick

    I'm on a ketogenic diet and have stopped taking protein shakes (excepting post-workout protein powder with water) because I've heard that it may cause an insulin spike. Is it true that protein powder with water will knock you out of ketosis? The one I'm using in particular is Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Whey.

  2. MattyP

    Yes it can.
    Protein is made up of seven different aminos, some of which (just as j.rightly correctly pointed out) can knock you out of ketosis because they are broken down into glucose in your blood.
    j.rightly is corrct. Do some research and it will confirm that protein can knock you out of keto. Anyone who says it can't doesn't understand the science behind it.
    That is why you are meant to eat about 65% of your diet from fats, 30% protein and no more than about 5% carbs (which will be incidental from your fat & protein based meals) to be sure you stay in ketosis.

  3. JoJo

    No.
    Ketosis is the deprivation of carbs. High end protein shakes, such as your ON Gold, don't contain many carbs. Thus, drinking your protein shake won't remove you from your ketogenic state. On the other hand, cheap proteins (Muscle Milk) and any protein labeled as "mass builder" will contain carbs to prevent ketosis.
    Your comment about protein shakes spiking insulin is wrong. Insulin is secreted to process sugar. Your ON Gold with water has hardly any sugar. Thus, drinking your protein shake will not spike your insulin. Insulin spikes usually only occur when you eat simple carbs from fruit, candy, etc...

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