diabetestalk.net

Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology Breakdown

Share on facebook

MedTerms 4 Fun www.medterms4fun.com In this video, N Epps shows how to analyze word parts, form a medical term, and define a medical term. In this example, we will use the term "Cardiology". Cardiology means the study of the heart. First, let's analyze the word by breaking down into word parts. Cardi is the root meaning heart. We will use the letter "R" for root. The letter "O" is the combining vowel. We will use the letters "CV" for combining vowel. -logy is the suffix meaning the study of. We will use the letter "S" for suffix. When we define the term, we start at the suffix and then move to the root. So, the term "Cardiology" means the study of (suffix) the heart (root). If you enjoy this video from MedTerms4Fun, please like us. I appreciate your support. For more helpful medical terminology tips, visit my website and follow me on Twitter and Pinterest! Twitter: MedTerms4Fun Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/medterms4fun ****Helpful Medical Terminology Books I Have Used: Medical Terminology: An Illustrated Guide Eighth Edition - https://go.magik.ly/ml/dnhu/ Medical Terminology: An Illustrated Guide Eighth Edition by Barbara J. Cohen BA MSEd - https://go.magik.ly/ml/dnhv/ Medical Term

Tcc Medical Terminology Jen Campbell Ch.14 Study Guide

hyposecretion of growth hormone during childhood and puberty. diabetes ______ / no word breakdown. Term means = lacking a distinctive appearance or taste. Fun Fact - if you didn't read this in the book, your gonna love this one fellow wanna be Dr's Patients with diabetes insipidus have tasteless, dilute urine, like water, while the urine of patients with diabetes mellitus is sweet. Before there were laboratories, physicians used to taste the patient's urine to make a diagnosis. condition; state; thing / many; much / urine condition; state; thing / many; much / thirst process; disease from a specific cause / above; more than normal / thyroid gland abnormal condition / shield-shaped structure (thyroid gland) / poison; toxin abnormal condition in which too much thyroid gland hormone acts as a poison chronic inflammation and progressive destruction of the thyroid gland. The most common type is _______ thyroiditis. process; disease from a specific cause / above; more than normal / beside; apart from; two parts of a pair; abnormal / thyroid gland condition of the blood; substance in the blood / above; more than normal / calcium process; disease from a specific cause / below; deficient / Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. olivo

    i went for my 35 wk check - am on weekly checks due to GD and polyhaydramnios - on thurs. there were ketones in my urine - what does that mean exactly?

  2. becksydee

    i had ketones in my urine when i went for my checkup (34wks) on monday - they wouldn't let me leave until it had been investigated so sounds like you got off lightly!
    it basically means that your body has stopped burning glucose as fuel and is burning fat & protein instead (ketosis) - in extreme cases it can mean you're suffering from ketoacidosis which is quite serious (& is the condition that the midwife/consultant would be worried about if they found ketones). it's diagnosed by testing blood gases & treated with IV fluids (due to dehydration) and insulin. if you had it, you would probably be feeling really rather ill (nausea, vomiting, stomach pain etc) and would also probably have smelly breath.

  3. notevenamousie

    EITHER that you've not been eating enough or you've not been drinking enough. Possibly both.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

This video helps the Spanish Medical Interpreter by expanding his/her Spanish Medical Terminology by demonstrating how to Pronounce Insulin in Spanish and adding a visual description of the word.

Medical Terminology - Chapter 18

Hormone secreted by the adrenal cortex; regulates salt and water balance. Male hormone responsible for developing and maintaining male secondary sex characteristics. Secreted by the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland; promotes water reabsorption by the kidney. Hormone secreted by the thyroid gland; lowers calcium levels in the blood. Hormones secreted by the adrenal medulla; epinephrine (adrenaline) is an example. Hormone secreted by the adrenal cortex; cortisol and aldosterone are examples. Hormone secreted by the adrenal cortex; regulates the use of sugars, fats, and proteins in cells. Cortisol raises blood sugar. Substance that, in solution, carries an electric charge; examples are sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca++) and chloride (Cl-). Medical specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine gland disorders. Hormone secreted by the adrenal medulla; increases heart rate and blood pressure. Female hormone secreted by the ovaries and to a lesser extent by the adrenal cortex in both males and females. Pertaining to the producing of female characteristics or having the same effect as estrogen. Measures circulating glucose level in a patient who has fasted at least Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Basic Medical Coding Terminology Medical Coding Terms http://www.cco.us/medical-terminology... There are so many basic medical coding terms you need to know early on. Here are a few with simple explanations. I get questions on these when people start the first couple chapters of the coding. The books tend to make them much harder than they have to be. It's actually very simple. When they say category, subcategory, subclassification or truncated codes or main terms, what they're really meaning is for category codes. That's a 3 digit code. So like COPD is 496 and you don't need any other digits to explain COPD, it's 496. So that's a category code. Now even if a code like hypertension which is 401.9, that's just like essential hypertension, that has a subcategory which is 9. But the category would be 401, the 3 digits but it has an additional subcategory which is 9, which explains the code a little bit more. And as a general rule, if something ends in 9, it's unspecified. That's the way it is in ICD 9. In ICD 10, it'll be different. But then, you can extend that out. ICD 9 codes go up to 5 digits. The last digit is called a subclassification. So that's a 5th digit. Diabetes, 250.00.

Diabetes Medical Terminology

Serious complication related to a deficiency of insulin and increase in insulin counter-regulatory hormones Enzyme that rapidly degrades active incretin hormones after they are released Normal concentration of glucose in the blood. Also called normoglycemia Stored form of glucose in the liver and skeletal muscle conversion of glycogen to glucose in the body The synthesis of glucose in the body from non-carbohydrates, such as protein or fats A value that represents the percent of hemoglobin in the blood that is glycosylated. This percent reflects the glycemic control over the past 2 to 3 months. Serious condition characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperosmolarity and dehydration and the absence of ketoacidosis that may occur in type 2 diabetes Most common acute complication of diabetes; occurs from a relative excess of insulin in the blood and is characterized by below-normal blood glucose levels A condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of ketones in the body tissues and fluid Breakdown of fats and lipids to fatty acids (alternative fuel source) Small blood vessel disease caused by long term exposure to hyperglycemia; most commonly affects the eyes, kidneys, and nerves L Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. SnowPetal

    Just wondering if I am the only one doing keto that is calorie counting as well?. Most people incuding on other sites aren't calorie counting whilst on keto. I have been reading studies on keto and a calorie controlled diet and the weightloss is definitely greater - which is why i'm doing it.

  2. thepapillon

    I am doing that as well... What amount are you keeping your calories? I did some reading and it looks like restricting the calories too much on a keto diet can make the weight loss slow down. I'm glad to hear you've found positive results. I can't say I'm complaining... I've only been doing the keto/calorie counting for 9 days... and I've lost 8 pounds.
    And though 8 pounds that quickly seems like a lot, or most likely water weight... I'm already fitting into my size 4 clothes, where I was an 8 before! So I'm content whether it be water weight or fat. LOL

  3. SnowPetal

    I'm sticking to 800 calories. Which for my body is what it needs to lose weight even with keto - my hormones are seriously stuffed!.
    Which studies said it can slow down weightloss? That doesn't make sense to me since starvation mode is a myth.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology Breakdown

    hyposecretion of growth hormone during childhood and puberty. diabetes ______ / no word breakdown. Term means = lacking a distinctive appearance or taste. Fun Fact - if you didn't read this in the book, your gonna love this one fellow wanna be Dr's Patients with diabetes insipidus have tasteless, dilute urine, like water, while the urine of patients with diabetes mellitus is sweet. Before there were laboratories, physicians used to taste the pat ...

    ketosis Mar 28, 2018
  • Define Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology

    Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patien ...

    ketosis Mar 29, 2018
  • Why Is Ketoacidosis A Medical Emergency

    A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get ou ...

    ketosis Jan 4, 2018
  • Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology

    Serious complication related to a deficiency of insulin and increase in insulin counter-regulatory hormones Enzyme that rapidly degrades active incretin hormones after they are released Normal concentration of glucose in the blood. Also called normoglycemia Stored form of glucose in the liver and skeletal muscle conversion of glycogen to glucose in the body The synthesis of glucose in the body from non-carbohydrates, such as protein or fats A va ...

    ketosis May 1, 2018
  • Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology Definition

    Root Words – Medical Terminology Example 1: (A root word with no prefix or suffix.) The root word "plasma" means a semi-liquid form found in cells. Example 2:(A prefix and root word conjoined.) The prefix dys- means painful and root word "uria" means urine, together they form the medical term "dysuria" which mean "painful or difficult urination. Example 3: (A root word and suffix conjoined.) The root word dermat means skin, the suffix olog ...

    ketosis Mar 29, 2018
  • Ketoacidosis Word Breakdown

    Before we get into anything, what does the word catabolism mean? When we went over catabolic and anabolic reactions, we said that catabolic reactions are the ones that break apart molecules. To remember what catabolic means, think of a CATastrophe where things are falling apart and breaking apart. You could also remember cats that tear apart your furniture. In order to make ATP for energy, the body breaks down mostly carbs, some fats and very sma ...

    ketosis Mar 29, 2018

Popular Articles

More in ketosis