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Ketoacidosis Medical Terminology

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MedTerms 4 Fun www.medterms4fun.com In this video, N Epps shows how to analyze word parts, form a medical term, and define a medical term. In this example, we will use the term "Cardiology". Cardiology means the study of the heart. First, let's analyze the word by breaking down into word parts. Cardi is the root meaning heart. We will use the letter "R" for root. The letter "O" is the combining vowel. We will use the letters "CV" for combining vowel. -logy is the suffix meaning the study of. We will use the letter "S" for suffix. When we define the term, we start at the suffix and then move to the root. So, the term "Cardiology" means the study of (suffix) the heart (root). If you enjoy this video from MedTerms4Fun, please like us. I appreciate your support. For more helpful medical terminology tips, visit my website and follow me on Twitter and Pinterest! Twitter: MedTerms4Fun Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/medterms4fun ****Helpful Medical Terminology Books I Have Used: Medical Terminology: An Illustrated Guide Eighth Edition - https://go.magik.ly/ml/dnhu/ Medical Terminology: An Illustrated Guide Eighth Edition by Barbara J. Cohen BA MSEd - https://go.magik.ly/ml/dnhv/ Medical Terminology Made Incredibly Easy (Incredibly Easy! Series) Fourth Edition by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins - https://go.magik.ly/ml/dnhw/ Medical Terminology Systems: A Body Systems Approach 8th Edition by Barbara A. Gylys MEd CMA-A - https://go.magik.ly/ml/dnhx/ FTC Disclosure: The product links are affiliate links. I will earn a commission if you click through and make a purchase. There is no cost to you.

Chapter 18 - Medical Terminology

exophthalmos (protrusion of the eyeballs) examples: myxedema - decreased activity of the thyroid gland in adults and characterized by dry skin, swellings around the lips and nose, mental deterioration cretinism - extreme disease during infancy and childhood, leads to lack of normal physical and mental growth excessive production of parathormone (parathyroid hormone) examples: virilization - too much testosterone, male characteristic seen in a female hirsutism - excessive hair on the face and body (bearded lady at the circus) lack of insulin secretion or resistance of insulin in promoting sugar, starch, fat metabolism in cells The signs and symptoms of this type of diabetes are polydipsia (excessive thirst), polyuria (excessive urination), and polyphagia (excessive eating) The diagnostic test which tests blood for glucose level (normal level 75-115); may go as high as 1000 with diabetes Primary Life-Threatening Complications of Increased Blood Sugar 1. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) - shock; sweet smelling breath 3. Hypoglycemia - took insulin but did not eat Secondary Complication that occurs over time S&S: aneurysms or sclerosing of blood vessels Secondary Complication that occurs o Continue reading >>

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  1. wordsmithe

    So I just came back from the doctor and her jaw literally dropped when she saw my cholesterol levels.
    My hdl was 90, but my LDL was 372. She told me to stop ketoing immediately and start taking cholesterol pills.
    Has anyone had such a high cholesterol level? If so, did you guys take medication?
    EDIT I've been reading a lot about high LDL levels and low TG levels and how there are different types of lipids in our blood. I'm not going to take the medication at this point and take a VAP test to see what kind of lipids are in my bloodstream.
    Also, I think it would be helpful to post some basic information.
    25 male 72 KG (159 lbs) 173 cm (5'9) Keto for six months Usual macros 45/45/10
    Keto helped me lose fat and gain muscle. I've been grateful for having keto guide me to a healthier lifestyle, but I'm willing to give it up if my heart is at risk.

  2. gogge

    Some people have issues with saturated fat, dietary cholesterol, or keto.
    Thomas Dayspring talks about a similar case (but with confirmed high LDL particle count) in one of his articles, I posted this in another thread:
    Some people react badly to saturated fat and dietary cholesterol (hyperresponders, longer post), they can probably still do keto (depends on how sensitive they are) just don't overdo the coconut oil, butter (eat more olive/avocado/canola oil instead) and cut down on eggs.
    Others might do better on just general non-ketogenic low carb, check out this article from Thomas Dayspring (a lipidologist referenced by Peter Attia and Gary Taubes) with a case very similar to yours (formatted for readability):
    “I started eating paleo/low-carb (with dairy) in Apr 2011. I should add that my diet has never been ultra low-carb -- just lower-carb than most people. My last blood test before going paleo was in Nov 2010 and my past numbers have always been similar:”
    Total cholesterol = 196
    LDL-C =105
    HDL-C = 75
    TG = 78 (all in mg/dL)
    TSH = 2.15
    “I lost 30 pounds in about 3 months and have kept it off ever since. Today I weigh 124 and maintain my weight easily eating this way, even though I am menopausal.”
    The lipid panel was repeated on the new diet:
    TC = 323
    LDL-C = 230
    HDL-C 83
    TG 49 (all in mg/dL)
    Total LDL-P = 2643 nmol/L (99 th percentile population cut point)
    TG/HDL-C = 0.59 (poor man’s marker of insulin sensitivity) Under 2.0 is excellent
    Not great changes, very high LDL cholesterol similar to your reaction, and this likely also means very high LDL particle count.
    Here's what they did:
    The dietary advice was to cut back on saturated fat and use more MUFA and PUFA without increasing carbs. After doing just that for a few months the patient reports:
    “The only modifications I've made because of my high lipids are eating steel cut oats regularly, adding chia seeds to my diet, and eating apples regularly (to increase fiber levels); cutting out most dairy; and watching my saturated fat intake a little more closely--all aimed at getting my high LDL-P down.” Weight has remained stable.
    Here are the follow up labs:
    TC = 178
    LDL-C = 92 (was 230)
    HDL-C = 82
    TG = 21
    Non-HDL-C = 96 (all inmg/dL)
    Total LDL-P: 948 nmol/L (recall it was grossly elevated at 2643) < 1000 nmol/L (20 th percentile population cut point) is desirable
    Small LDL-P: < 90 nmol/L (normal)
    LDL Size: 21.4 nm (quite large)
    CRP was near 0.
    Thomas Dayspring, "Lipidaholics Anonymous Case 291 Can losing weight worsen lipids?"
    The article is a very long read, but it's also absolutely excellent at explaining why some people can react badly and what to really look for in a lipid test, and what to do about it when things look bad.

  3. wordsmithe

    Thanks for the extensive response. Im definitely going to take some time today to do more reading and research. Im still 50/50 on taking the medication, but I do feel better knowing otbers have had similar reactions from keto.

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/Register... Popular Playlists: "NCLEX Study Strategies": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Fluid & Electrolytes Made So Easy": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Skills Videos": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Study Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing School Tips & Questions": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Types of Nursing Specialties": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Healthcare Salary Information": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "New Nurse Tips": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Nursing Career Help": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "EKG Teaching Tutorials": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Personality Types": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Dosage & Calculations for Nurses": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... "Diabetes Health Managment": https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack Continue reading >>

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  1. kaazoom

    I recently had my Hba1c tests and it was over 9 . The doctor increased my metformin from 1 tablet twice a day to 2 tablets twice a day. I was told to start by increasing the morning dose and after 2 weeks increase my evening dose. I have had a lot of stomach discomfort, and terrible indigestion since increasing the does. I work up the other morning in extreme pain like I was having a heart attack. The pain went after taking antacids. Indigestion is something I get every now and then, but it is usually due to eating something I should avoid. This day I don't think I had eaten anything that would cause it. But I had increased my evening dose of metformin, so I was and am on 4 tablets a day. I have had more general discomfort than usual, muscle pains and more breathlessness.The difficult is I have other health problems so knowing which one is caused by which is a nightmare.
    I also tend to let myself get dehydrated at night as I have bladder problems which I having investigations for at the moment. If I don't stop drinking about at about 7pm I end up waking numerous times to go to the loo. The only drink I have after 7pm is a few sips of water to help swallow my medications.
    Sorry for being so long winded. My main question is does lactic acidosis come on suddenly, or does it build up over days or weeks?
    Paul

  2. destiny0321

    Hi. If you find your metformin could be causing problems which it did with me runs,breathing problems and generally really poorly go back to your gp I did and I was put on me form in slow release which is much gentler on the stomach hope this helps you destiny
    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App

  3. kaazoom

    Thanks.
    I've got to see my GP next week about something else so I will talk to him about it. I don't think I have lactic acidosis, I was curious about whether it was sudden or gradual onset. I saw something on the TV yesterday that said patients are risking their health because they don't read the information sheets that come with their medication. So I had a look at mine. It gave a number of symptoms to watch out for including severe indigestion,muscle spasms etc it said if you have any of these symptoms when taking Metformin to go immediately to the nearest hospital A&E because these symptoms can be signs of lactic acidosis. I don't think what I'm experiencing is severe enough for A&E.
    I had muscle spasms, pains and a number of the other symptoms list prior to my diabetes diagnose due to other illnesses, and they can vary in severity. They seem to have got somewhat worse since my metformin was increased, but it could just be coincidence. The indigestion and stomach problems are particularly bad. My feeling is my body is taking time to adapt to them. i will ask my doctor if I can change to a slow release version.
    Paul

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the Continue reading >>

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  1. wild_wild_wes

    Keto strip test results

    I started Keto on Monday. Today I bought the Keto test strip kit a WalMart and just tried one. The color result put me somewhere in the SMALL (15) to MODERATE (40) range, but much closer to MODERATE.
    Is that okay?

  2. lbendall

    throw them away

  3. PullAndBear

    Originally Posted by lbendall
    throw them away

    um..why?

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