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Ketoacidosis Icd 10

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Diagnostic And Therapeutic Dilemma

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Diagnostic And Therapeutic Dilemma

Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis: a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma 1Department of Internal Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County, Martinsville, Virginia, USA, 2Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, Texas, USA, 3Senior Research Associate, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, 4Department of Pharmacology, St Johns Medical College, Bangalore, India, Received 2017 Jul 18; Accepted 2017 Aug 4. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License . Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (EDKA) is a clinical triad comprising increased anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia or ketonuria and normal blood glucose levels <200 mg/dL. This condition is a diagnostic challenge as euglycemia masquerades the underlying diabetic ketoacidosis. Thus, a high clinical suspicion is warranted, and other diagnosis ruled out. Here, we present two patients on regular insulin treatment who were admitted with a diagnosis of EDKA. The first patient had insulin pump failure and the second patient had urinary tract infection and nausea, thereby resulting in starvation. Both of them were aggressively treated with intravenous fluids and insulin drip as per the protocol for the blood glucose levels till the anion gap normalized, and the metabolic acidosis reversed. This case series summarizes, in brief, the etiology, pathophysiology and treatment of EDKA. Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis is rare. Consider ketosis in patients with DKA even if their serum glucose levels are normal. High clinical suspicion is required to diagnose EDKA as normal blood sugar levels masquerade the underlying DKA and cause a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Blood pH and blood or urine Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code

A condition in which the blood is too acidic. It may be caused by severe illness or sepsis (bacteria in the bloodstream). A disorder characterized by abnormally high acidity (high hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissues. A pathologic condition of acid accumulation or depletion of base in the body. The two main types are respiratory acidosis and metabolic acidosis, due to metabolic acid build up. A state due to excess retention of carbon dioxide in the body. Acid base imbalance resulting from an accumulation of carbon dioxide secondary to hypoventilation. Acidosis caused by accumulation of lactic acid more rapidly than it can be metabolized. It may occur spontaneously or in association with diseases such as diabetes mellitus, leukemia, or liver failure. Acidosis caused by accumulation of lactic acid more rapidly than it can be metabolized; may occur spontaneously or in association with diseases such as diabetes mellitus, leukemia, or liver failure. An abnormal increase in the acidity of the body's fluids An abnormally high acidity (excess hydrogen-ion concentration) of the blood and other body tissues. An abnormally high acidity of the blood and other body tissues. Acidosis can be either respiratory or metabolic. Excess retention of carbon dioxide in the body resulting from ventilatory impairment. Increased acidity in the blood secondary to acid base imbalance. Causes include diabetes, kidney failure and shock. Metabolic acidosis characterized by the accumulation of lactate in the body. It is caused by tissue hypoxia. Pathologic condition resulting from accumulation of acid or depletion of the alkaline reserve (bicarbonate) content of the blood and body tissues, and characterized by an increase in hydrogen ion concentration (decrease in ph). Respi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Other Specified Complication

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Other Specified Complication

Diabetes mellitus, type 2 with ketoacidotic coma Diabetes type 2 low hdl and high triglyceride Diabetes type 2 with erectile dysfunction Diabetes type 2 with hyperlipidemia Diabetes type 2 with severe malnutrition Diabetes, type 2 with ketoacidosis Diabetes, type 2 with osteomyelitis Dyslipidemia with high density lipoprotein below reference range and triglyceride above reference range due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Erectile dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus Hyperlipidemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Ketoacidosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus Ketoacidosis in type ii diabetes mellitus Ketoacidotic coma in type 2 diabetes mellitus Ketoacidotic coma in type ii diabetes mellitus Mixed hyperlipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus Mixed hyperlipidemia due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Osteomyelitis due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Severe malnutrition due to type 2 diabetes mellitus Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10-cm: A Preview Of Urgent Care-relevant Changes

2018 Icd-10-cm: A Preview Of Urgent Care-relevant Changes

2018 ICD-10-CM: A Preview of Urgent Care-Relevant Changes Posted On August 28, 2017 By Stuart Williams In Practice Management , Revenue Cycle Management 2018 ICD-10-CM: A Preview of Urgent Care-Relevant Changes Its again time to review what has changed with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) effective October 1, 2017 through September 30, 2018. There are 360 new, 142 deleted, and 226 revised diagnosis codes in the final update. We will review the changes most relevant to urgent care, but the examples shown here are not all-inclusive. You can find all updates in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) website at . Code A04.7 was deleted to make room for two new codes that further specify if the episode of enterocolitis is recurrent or not: 71, Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile, recurrent 72, Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile, not specified as recurrent Code C96.2 was deleted, and the category was expanded to further specify findings for malignant mast cell tumors: 20, Malignant mast cell neoplasm, unspecified Two codes were added for type 2 diabetes: 10, Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma 11, Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma Code E85.8 was deleted, and the category was expanded to further specify the type of amyloidosis, such as: You will now have the ability to report when a patient is in remission from abuse of each of a variety of substances: 11, Sedative, hypnotic or anxiolytic abuse, in remission 11, Other stimulant abuse, in remission 11, Other psychoactive substance abuse, in remission See changes in code group H44.2 when reporting degenerative myopia with: Changes in code group H54 will allow providers to track rapid deterioration Continue reading >>

2017/18 Icd-10-cm Codes E13*: Other Specified Diabetes Mellitus

2017/18 Icd-10-cm Codes E13*: Other Specified Diabetes Mellitus

E10.1 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis E10.10 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis wi... E10.11 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis wi... E10.2 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with kidney complica... E10.21 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephro... E10.22 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic chroni... E10.29 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with other diabetic ... E10.3 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with ophthalmic comp... E10.31 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with unspecified dia... E10.32 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.321 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3211 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3212 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3213 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3219 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.329 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3291 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3292 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3293 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.3299 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with mild nonprolife... E10.33 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.331 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3311 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3312 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3313 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3319 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.339 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3391 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3392 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with moderate nonpro... E10.3393 Type 1 diabetes mellitus with Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code E87.2

2018 Icd-10-cm Diagnosis Code E87.2

E87- Other disorders of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base balance E87.2 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. The 2018 edition of ICD-10-CM E87.2 became effective on October 1, 2017. This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E87.2 - other international versions of ICD-10 E87.2 may differ. A type 1 excludes note is a pure excludes. It means "not coded here". A type 1 excludes note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as E87.2. A type 1 excludes note is for used for when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition. Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code pancreatitis and other diseases of the pancreas ( K85 - K86 .-) secondary diabetes mellitus NEC ( E13.- ) 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code diabetes (mellitus) due to autoimmune process diabetes (mellitus) due to immune mediated pancreatic islet beta-cell destruction diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition ( E08.- ) drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus ( E09.- ) secondary diabetes mellitus NEC ( E13.- ) 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code diabetes mellitus due to genetic defects of beta-cell function diabetes mellitus due to genetic defects in insulin action diabetes (mellitus) due to autoimmune process ( E10.- ) diabetes (mellitus) due to immune mediated pancreatic islet beta-cell destruction ( E10.- ) diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition ( E08.- ) drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus ( E09.- ) The following code(s) above E87.2 contain annotation back-references In this context, annotation back-references refer to codes that contain: Endocrine, nutritional Continue reading >>

Invokamet - Coverage Resources - Icd-10 Support | Janssen Carepath

Invokamet - Coverage Resources - Icd-10 Support | Janssen Carepath

Easy access to the information you may need If youre a provider, youll want to get familiar with billing codes that went into effect October 1, 2015. While sample ICD-9-CM codes have been mapped to the latest ICD-10-CM codes so that coders can become familiar with the new codes, the ultimate responsibility for correct coding lies with the provider of services. The codes included in the charts below are not intended to be promotional, or toencourage or suggest a use of any drug that is inconsistent with FDA-approved use. Please refer to the current policy for the latest codes since these codes are subject to change. The codes provided are not intended to be exhaustive. Please consult your ICD-10 code book for additional information. Third-party reimbursement is affected by many factors. The content provided is for informational purposes only and is not intended to provide reimbursement or legal advice and does not promise or guarantee coverage, levels of reimbursement, payment, or charge. Similarly, all CPT* and HCPCS codes are supplied for informational purposes only and represent no promise or guarantee that these codes will be appropriate or that reimbursement will be made. It is not intended to increase or maximize reimbursement by any payer. Laws, regulations, and policies concerning reimbursement are complex and are updated frequently. While we have made an effort to be current as of the issue date of this document, the information may not be as current or comprehensive when you view it. We strongly recommend that you consult with your payer organization(s) for local or actual coverage and reimbursement policies and with your internal reimbursement specialist for any reimbursement or billing questions. *CPT copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All rights r Continue reading >>

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E10.10

Icd-10 Diagnosis Code E10.10

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body functions, such as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk for heart disease and bone and joint disorders. Other long-term complications of diabetes include skin problems, digestive problems, sexual dysfunction, and problems with your teeth and gums. Very high or very low blood sugar levels can also lead to emergencies in people with diabetes. The cause can be an underlying infection, certain medicines, or even the medicines you take to control your diabetes. If you feel nauseated, sluggish or shaky, seek emergency care. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes: Dental Tips - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research) Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetic ketoacidosis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also called: Insulin-dependent diabetes, Juvenile diabetes, Type I diabetes Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age. Symptoms may include Type 1 diabetesType 1 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, specialized cells in the pancreas called beta cells stop pr Continue reading >>

Coding Tip: Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Coding Tip: Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Coding Tip: Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) How do coders report diabetic ketoacidosis in ICD-10-CM? For FY2018 there is a new code to report Type 2 diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This was previously reported with code E13.1-, other specified diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with or without coma. Now, there is a code specifically for reporting this diagnosis. E11.1- is used to report Type 2 diabetes with DKA with or without coma. DKA is life threatening complication in patients with diabetes. This typically occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes but can also be found in patients with type 2. When a patient has DKA it is implied that they also have hyperglycemia so no additional code is needed to report that the diabetes is with hyperglycemia. A separate standalone code for hyperglycemia is also not reported and there is an excludes1 note in the tabular. DKA occurs when the body produces high levels of blood acids known as ketones. This develops when the body isnt producing enough insulin. When the body does not produce or have enough insulin, the body begins to break down fat as fuel. When the body switches to burning fat this produces a buildup of acids that are called ketones. Excess ketones build up and are spilled over into the urine. Certain medication uses especially steroids and diuretics Insulin is given to reverse the process that caused the patient to go into DKA. In severe cases, this will be given intravenously. Once the blood sugar levels fall to be below 240 mg/dL and the blood is no longer acidic, regular insulin therapy can be resumed. Fluid and electrolytes will also be replaced. The fluids are given either via mouth or IV and are given to replace the fluid lost through excessive urination. The fluid replacement will also help to dilute the exc Continue reading >>

Effect Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis On The Outcomes Of St-elevation Myocardial Infarction: An Analysis Of National Inpatient Sample

Effect Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis On The Outcomes Of St-elevation Myocardial Infarction: An Analysis Of National Inpatient Sample

Effect of diabetic ketoacidosis on the outcomes of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: An analysis of national inpatient sample Find articles by Dhrubajyoti Bandyopadhyay aIcahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/Mount Sinai St Luke's Roosevelt, Manhattan, New York, USA bZucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Manhasset, New York, USA cMount Sinai-Beth Israel Hospital, New York, NY, USA dInterfaith Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, USA eJacobi Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA fJohn H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL, USA gCleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA hCase Western Reserve University, Heart and Vascular Institute, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA Received 2019 May 28; Accepted 2019 Jun 9. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (Diabetes is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease worldwide. The incidence of CAD is known to be as high as 50% in diabetic patients [ 1 , 2 ]. It has been established that survival and immediate mortality after a myocardial infarction is affected by diabetes [ 3 , 4 ]. Complications such as cardiogenic shock, congestive heart failure, conduction abnormalities, and large anterior wall transmural infarcts are more common in the diabetic patient than non-diabetic patient [ 3 ]. Hyperglycemia with or without diabetes has also been shown to be independently associated with increased in-patient mortality and microvascular obstruction in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients [ 5 , 6 ]. However, there is limited data on patients with STEMI and acute hyperglycemic state such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is an acute complication of diabetes leading to significant metabolic derangements that can be fatal if not Continue reading >>

Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis With The Correct Icd-10 Codes

Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis With The Correct Icd-10 Codes

Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosiswith the Correct ICD-10 CodesReporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) with the Correct ICD-10 Codes Reporting Diabetic Ketoacidosis can occurwhen your blood sugar level is too high for toolong. The article lists the symptoms, diagnosisand ICD-10 codes for the same. Outsource Strategies International8596 E. 101st Street, Suite HTulsa, OK 74133 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, life-threatening complication ofdiabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acidscalled ketones. Most commonly occurring among patients with Type1diabetes (but can sometimes occur in people with Type 2 diabetes), DKAdevelops when your body cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin plays a keyrole in helping glucose (a main source of energy for your muscles and othertissues) to enter your cells. Without adequate insulin, your body begins tobreak down fat as fuel, which in turn produces a buildup of acids in thebloodstream (called ketones) eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis.Excess ketones build up and are spilled over into the urine. If left untreated,ketones can build up to dangerous levels causing severe complications likediabetic coma or even death. The condition is usually triggered by injury,infection or other illness, missed or inadequate insulin therapy, heart attack,use of certain medications (such as corticosteroids and some diuretics), bingedrinking, illegal drugs usage and physical or emotional trauma. However, insome cases there are no obvious triggers. Endocrinology medical billing andcoding is a complex procedure. Physicians need to be ready with the correctICD-10 codes for this diabetes related condition and medical codingoutsourcing to an experienced service provider is a reliable strategy toensure this. Warning Signs and Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10 Update Part 3: New Codes For Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st

2018 Icd-10 Update Part 3: New Codes For Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st

2018 ICD-10 Update Part 3: New Codes for Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st | 2018 ICD-10 Update Part 3: New Codes for Diabetes, Myopia Start October 1st September 28, 2017 | Rhonda Buckholtz, CPC, CPCI, CPMA, CDEO, CRC, CHPSE, COPC, CENTC, CPEDC, CGSC, VP of Practice Optimization, Eye Care Leaders Like most eye care practices, you likely treat patients with co-morbid conditions. The patient population of many practices is often older than average, and many times chronically ill. So, correctly coding for co-morbidity is essential in avoiding costly revenue leaks that could drain cash from your practice. Recent studies have shown that the number of type 2 patients presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis has been increasing, and thats one reason for the new DKA codes. Prior to the 2018 revisions, the best coding option to describe a patient with type 2 DKA was E11.69 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus with other specified complication). Beginning October 1, 2017, youll see a new subdivision among the E11 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus) codes: E11.1 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis). This new subdivision includes two codes: Other DKA-related additions occur in the following code series: E08 (Diabetes mellitus due to underlying condition) E09 (Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus) E13 (Other specified diabetes mellitus ) All four series contain XXX.1 ( with ketoacidosis) as a subdivision containing two codes: Updates for Coding Medical Management of Diabetes General guidelines for coding diabetes mellitus and secondary diabetes mellitus instruct coders how to report the medical management of diabetes. TheICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting are available here .Youll find the first revisions in bold under Chapter 4.a.1, Diabetes mellitus and the use of in Continue reading >>

Data Element: Diagnostic Coding (diabetes Relevant Icd-10)

Data Element: Diagnostic Coding (diabetes Relevant Icd-10)

DIAGNOSTIC CODING (DIABETES RELEVANT ICD-10) Records the DIAGNOSTIC CODING identified in the following relevant conditions and complications associated with the diabetic condition: The list shows those conditions and complications currently extracted by QUIDS using data linkage to Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). ICD-10 Codes for relevant conditions and complications Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis Other specified diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis Unspecified diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis and coma Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis and coma Other specified diabetes mellitus with coma Acute transmural myocardial infarction of anterior wall Acute transmural myocardial infarction of inferior wall Acute transmural myocardial infarction of other sites Acute transmural myocardial infarction of unspecified site Subsequent myocardial infarction of anterior wall Subsequent myocardial infarction of inferior wall Subsequent myocardial infarction of other sites Subsequent myocardial infarction of unspecified site Intracerebral haemorrhage in hemisphere, subcortical Intracerebral haemorrhage in hemisphere, cortical Intracerebral haemorrhage in hemisphere, unspecified Cerebral infarct due to thrombosis of precerebral arteries Cerebral infarction due to embolism of precerebral arteries Cerebral infarct due to unspecified occlusion or stenos of precerebral arteries Cerebral infarction due to thrombosis of cerebral arteries Cerebral infarction due to embolism of cerebral arteries Cerebral infarction due to unspecified occlusion or stenosis of cerebral arteries Cerebral infarction due to cerebral venous thrombosis Continue reading >>

2018 Icd-10-cm Code Changes Effective October 1, 2017

2018 Icd-10-cm Code Changes Effective October 1, 2017

There are 360 new, 226 revised, and 142 deleted ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes finalized for fiscal 2018 taking effect October 1, 2017. Here are highlights of the coding changes in chapter order. Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00-E89) (chapter 4): Two new codes specify “with ketoacidosis” E11.10: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis without coma E11.11: Type 2 diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis with coma Diseases of the circulatory system (I00-I99) (chapter 9): Nineteen codes were added to this chapter I21.9: Acute myocardial infarction, unspecified I21.A1: Myocardial infarction type 2 I21.A9: Other myocardial infarction type I27.20: Pulmonary hypertension, unspecified I27.21: Secondary pulmonary arterial hypertension I27.22: Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease I27.23: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and hypoxia I27.24: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension I27.29: Other secondary pulmonary hypertension I27.83: Eisenmenger’s syndrome I50.810: Right heart failure, unspecified I50.811: Acute right heart failure I50.812: Chronic right heart failure I50.813: Acute on chronic right heart failure I50.814: Right heart failure due to left heart failure I50.82: Biventricular heart failure I50.83: High output heart failure I50.84: End stage heart failure I50.89: Other heart failure Diseases of the digestive system (K00-K95) (chapter 11): Six new codes for Intestinal adhesions and obstructions were added to this chapter K56.50: Intestinal adhesions [bands], unspecified as to partial versus complete obstruction K56.51: Intestinal adhesions [bands], with partial obstruction K56.52: Intestinal adhesions [bands], with complete obstruction K56.690: Other partial intestinal obstruction K56.691: Other complete intestinal obstructi Continue reading >>

Podcast | Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diagnosis And Icd-10 Codes

Podcast | Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diagnosis And Icd-10 Codes

A medical billing and coding company based in the United States, Outsource Strategies International (OSI) has extensive experience in providing medical billing and coding services for all medical specialties. In todays podcast, Natalie Tornese, one of our Senior Solutions Managers, discusses Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious complication of diabetes, and its symptoms, diagnosis, and ICD-10 codes. Hello everyone and welcome to our podcast series! My name is Natalie Tornese. I am a Senior Solutions Manager at Outsource Strategies International (OSI). I wanted to talk a little bit about diabetes ketoacidosis. Diabetes ketoacidosis is also abbreviated as DKA and I may use that abbreviation during this podcast. Diabetes ketoacidosis occurs when your body produces high levels of ketones. The condition develops when your body does not have enough insulin to process high levels of glucose in the blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues Insulin plays a major role in regulating the glucose entering your cells. Without adequate insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel called ketones, which causes the blood to become acidic. Ketones are normally produced when the body breaks down fat after a long time between meals. When ketones are produced too quickly and build up in the blood and urine, they can be toxic by making the blood acidic and leading to a condition called ketoacidosis. If left untreated, this condition can lead to serious complications like loss of consciousness, coma, or even death. Physicians treating this diabetes-related disorder need to educate patients about the risks of this condition and prevent it by identifying the warning signs early, and checking the urine and blood sugar level early as well. According to Continue reading >>

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