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Ketoacidosis How To Test

Lab Values And Dka

Lab Values And Dka

Changes in laboratory values often give us clues to what is happening with our patients. I came across the following resource this morning and thought it was worth sharing. Here’s a handy table to help you identify diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). The following equation can be used to calculate an anion gap: Anion gap = Na+(mEq/L) – [Cl-(mEq/L) + HCO3-(mEq/L)] You have an important role when caring for a patient with DKA. Thorough physical assessments, careful monitoring of laboratory values, and critical thinking are essential to avoid complications of this complex disorder. Have you cared for a patient with DKA? What are the common presenting signs and symptoms? Reference Donahey, E., Folse, S., Weant, K. (2012). Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis. Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal, 34(3). Continue reading >>

With What Diet Can I Lose A Lot Of Weight Fast?

With What Diet Can I Lose A Lot Of Weight Fast?

Look, almost any diet will make you lose weight. But what are you going to do when you’re finished with them? If you’re like most people, you’ll fall back on your old habits—the same ones that made you fat in the first place. That’s why most diets end in failure. It’s not that they’re ineffective—although some are complete rubbish; it’s that they’re a temporary answer to a semi-permanent problem. Here’s what you need to find out: what’s the healthiest form of food consumption you can enjoy for the rest of your life? Maybe you like veganism? Or paleo, or keto, or whatever. Perhaps you don’t end up in any diet camp and instead create your own habits. That’s great too. But here’s what matters for right now: if you want to lose weight, then you must consume food at a caloric deficit. This means eating less calories than you burn. I lost eighty pounds a number of years ago. About fifty to sixty pounds of that came without any exercise; I simply ate at a caloric deficit and tracked everything on MyFitnessPal—an online food journal with a mobile app. Similar stories can be found daily on forums like Reddit’s /r/loseit. You can literally achieve this eating junk food. (although I don’t recommend it!) A professor at Kansas State University lost 27lbs in 2 months eating Twinkies, chips, Oreos, and other junk. More recently, I lost 6lbs after eating exclusively at gas stations for 30 days. I traveled across 9 states and visited more than 200 stores—all in an effort to prove that you can “eat out” and still be healthy. But to be fair, the convenience store industry is working hard to make healthful food available on-the-go. Finding fruit, veggies, and good made-to-order options was easier than I thought it would be. So here’s the point: d Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

show all detail Diagnostic Tests 1st Tests To Order Test Result plasma glucose To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In elevated ABG To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In pH varies from 7.00 to 7.30 in DKA; arterial bicarbonate ranges from <10 mEq/L in severe DKA to >15 mEq/L in mild DKA capillary or serum ketones To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In beta-hydroxybutyrate elevated ≥3.8 mmol/L in adults or ≥3.0 mmol/L in children U/A To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In positive for glucose and ketones; positive for leukocytes and nitrites in the presence of infection serum BUN To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In elevated serum creatinine To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In elevated serum sodium To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In usually low serum potassium To access clinical pearls and in-depth diagnosis and treatment information, sign up for a FREE Epocrates Online account. Sign Up Now! Current Members - Sign In usually el Continue reading >>

Ketones Urine Test

Ketones Urine Test

Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test A ketone urine test measures the amount of ketones in the urine. How the Test is Performed Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that you can buy at a drug store. The kit contains dipsticks coated with chemicals that react with ketone bodies. A dipstick is dipped in the urine sample. A color change indicates the presence of ketones. This article describes the ketone urine test that involves sending collected urine to a lab. A clean-catch urine sample is needed. The clean-catch method is used to prevent germs from the penis or vagina from getting into a urine sample. To collect your urine, the health care provider may give you a special clean-catch kit that contains a cleansing solution and sterile wipes. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate. How to Prepare for the Test You may have to follow a special diet. Your provider may tell you to temporarily stop taking certain medicines that may affect the test. How the Test will Feel The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort. Why the Test is Performed Ketone testing is most often done if you have type 1 diabetes and: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL Nausea or vomiting occur Pain in the abdomen Ketone testing may also be done: You have an illness such as pneumonia, heart attack, or stroke Nausea or vomiting that does not go away You are pregnant Normal Results A negative test result is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What Is Ketoacidosis And How Can Be Avoided & Treated?

Diabetes: What Is Ketoacidosis And How Can Be Avoided & Treated?

Good question! According to Wikipedia: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. In order to define ketoacidosis a little better, let's go back to the source: diabetes. Someone who is diabetic is unable to produce insulin, a hormone necessary for the transfer of sugar from the bloodstream to the cells, which in turn produce energy. If this progression is disrupted, through lack of insulin for example, the body has to try to compensate by creating energy elsewhere. And so the body starts to burn fat and muscle to meet its energy needs. Unfortunately, this chemical reaction produces molecules known as ketone bodies. In small quantities, these are fine, and it is in fact normal to have traces of them in your blood (approximately 1mg/dl). However, if the quantity of ketones surpasses this threshold by too much, it starts to affect the pH of your blood (which becomes progressively more acidic). Even the slightest drop in pH can have dangerous effects: as the quantity of the ketones in your blood increases, and the blood pH diminishes, your kidneys start having problems. Eventually, if the ketoacidosis is left untreated, your kidneys can fail and you can die from dehydration, tachycardia and hypotension. A number of other symptoms can appear in extreme cases. Fortunately for us, the quantity of ketones has to be consequential, and it usually takes a while before individuals start manifesting symptoms. In my case, my diabetes went undiagnosed for a month and a half before it was discovered, and even then my ketone levels were relatively normal. If you're a diabetic, ketoacidosis can be easily avoided by controlling your blood sugar levels and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Some doctors, preferring to stay on the Continue reading >>

Ketones Blood Test

Ketones Blood Test

Acetone bodies; Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood; Ketoacidosis - ketones blood test A ketone blood test measures the amount of ketones in the blood. How the Test is Performed How to Prepare for the Test No preparation is needed. How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel slight pain. Others feel a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or a slight bruise. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Ketones are substances produced in the liver when fat cells break down in the blood. This test is used to diagnose ketoacidosis. This is a life-threatening problem that affects people who: Have diabetes. It occurs when the body cannot use sugar (glucose) as a fuel source because there is no insulin or not enough insulin. Fat is used for fuel instead. When fat breaks down, waste products called ketones build up in the body. Drink large amounts of alcohol. Normal Results A normal test result is negative. This means there are no ketones in the blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test results. What Abnormal Results Mean A test result is positive if ketones are found in the blood. This may indicate: Other reasons ketones are found in the blood include: A diet low in carbohydrates can increase ketones. After receiving anesthesia for surgery Glycogen storage disease (condition in which the body can't break down glycogen, a form of sugar that is stored in the liver and muscles) Being on a weight-loss diet Risks Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another and from one side of the body to the other. Continue reading >>

Urine Ketone Dip Test As A Screen For Ketonemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Ketosis In The Emergency Department☆☆☆★★★

Urine Ketone Dip Test As A Screen For Ketonemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Ketosis In The Emergency Department☆☆☆★★★

Abstract Study objective: To determine the sensitivity of the urine ketone dip test (UKDT) for the detection of ketonemia in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetic ketosis (DK) in the ED. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review in the ED of an urban, university- affiliated county teaching hospital. The study population comprised patients seen in the ED during 1994 and 1995 with a discharge diagnosis of DKA or DK and underwent urinalysis within 4 hours of the initial serum electrolyte and ketone determinations. We calculated test sensitivity, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: One hundred forty-eight patients with 223 occurrences diagnosed as DKA or DK were seen in the ED during the study period. One hundred fourteen patients with 146 occurrences of DKA or DK met all inclusion criteria; these patients made up the study group. There were 99 cases of DKA and 47 cases of DK. The sensitivity of the UKDT for the detection of ketonemia in all patients with DKA or DK was 97% (95% CI, 94% to 99%) . In the subgroup of patients with DKA, the sensitivity of the UK was 97% (95% CI, 92% to 99%). For patients with DK, the sensitivity of the UK was 98% (95% CI, 89% to 99%). Conclusion: The UKDT is highly sensitive for the presence of serum ketones in patients with DKA and DK. Prospective study is suggested to determine the specificity of the UKDT in this application and to validate its use as a screening tool for the detection of ketonemia in DKA and DK. [Hendey GW, Schwab T, Soliz T: Urine ketone dip test as a screen for ketonemia in diabetic ketoacidosis and ketosis in the emergency department. Ann Emerg Med June 1997; 29:735-738.] Continue reading >>

Testing For Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms In Dogs

Testing For Diabetic Ketoacidosis Symptoms In Dogs

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an extreme form of hyperglycemia, during which ketones build up in the bloodstream. Ketoacidosis can be fatal, so it’s essential to contact your veterinarian as soon as symptoms arise. Symptoms can include vomiting, weakness, rapid breathing and the odor of acetone on the breath. Your veterinarian will perform a variety of tests to determine if your diabetic dog is suffering from ketoacidosis, including blood testing and urine dipsticks. Your dog might need to stay at the vet for around-the-clock monitoring. Blood Testing for Ketoacidosis Your veterinarian performs a blood test to determine if your dog is suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis. He collects a small amount of blood, testing it for high circulating blood sugar levels and blood pH levels, as well as phosphorus and potassium levels. Electrolyte levels can fluctuate, so he might perform several tests over a period of time to create a record of imbalances, as well as determine which intravenous fluids would best benefit your dog. Blood tests continue until your dog shows significant improvement. Urine Dipstick Test for Ketones While caring for your pet, the vet places a catheter inside the dog to collect urine. He tests the urine with a dipstick to perform a routine urinalysis, which he's likely to repeat many times during your dog’s emergency care stay. When a urine dipstick no longer reads positive for ketones, your dog is well on his way to recovery. Around-the-Clock Monitoring and Fluid Therapy During ketoacidosis, your dog’s cells experience a severe loss of glucose. This can be dangerous, so early detection is best. If possible, get your dog into a 24-hour care facility as soon as you notice symptoms. The vet closely monitors your dog, ensuring he is treated for any infection Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Develop?

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Develop?

Diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA, is a serious, life-threatening condition that can cause a diabetic coma and possibly death. It develops when the body does not get enough sugar in order to produce energy because of a lack of insulin. This causes the body to start using stored fat for energy. According to WebMD, when the body cannot convert the sugar into energy, it stays inside of the bloodstream (WebMD, 2017). This causes the kidneys to filter some of the sugar from the blood into the urine. This causes ketones to be released from the breakdown of fat, making the blood’s pH level to become acidic. DKA is a condition that should not be taken lightly. It can cause several different problems inside of the body. It is very important that you take care of your body in order to prevent the development of DKA. How does DKA start? WebMD said, “Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things” (WebMD, 2017). There are things that you can control. Frequent communication with your doctor will assist you in determining how much insulin you should take and when. If you keep taking it consistently and on time, it will help immensely. It is difficult to control if you get a severe infection or illness. However, you do have control on how you will react. Do not be afraid to go to the doctor. Get the medical treatment that you need so it does not become much worse. DKA can also be caused by dehydration. Drinking water is a great way to prevent dehydration. Also, cutting out beverages like soda can also help a ton! Focusing more on water will also help you to cut out unnecessary sodium, trans fats, and sugars that you do not need. By drinking healthier, it will make yo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Urine Test Kits

Urine Test Kits

What is the difference between the urine test kits for people with diabetes? Three different kinds of urine testing kits are available for testing three different substances in the urine: glucose (sugar), ketones, and microscopic amounts of protein (microalbuminuria). Glucose test kits Before the development of blood glucose meters, urine testing was the only method for gauging a person's sugar levels. However, it has always been a very imprecise method for testing glucose levels for a variety of reasons: Urine test strips cannot detect glucose (sugar) until the blood glucose level is above 180 mg/dl. This means a person's blood sugar level could still be high (hyperglycemia) or even dangerously low (hypoglycemia) but still not be detected. Urine glucose testing is highly subject to user error because it requires color interpretation of the urine test strip via a color-scale comparison. This becomes an issue with people who are colorblind or have poor eyesight, and certain drugs and vitamin C can change the color of the urine and thus provide an invalid measurement. The reading reflects the level of blood glucose from a few hours earlier - not at the present moment - and often is misinterpreted. As a result of these shortcomings, healthcare professionals recommend that anyone needing to closely monitor blood glucose levels use a blood glucose meter. However, urine strips can be useful in certain populations who physically cannot or will not test themselves with a blood glucose meter. Ketone test kits Ketone bodies are the byproducts of the body burning fat, rather than glucose, to provide energy. When fat is used for energy instead of glucose, the preferred fuel source, the liver produces substances called ketones. If ketones build up, they can lead to a life-threatenin Continue reading >>

Original Article Thyroid Function Test In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Original Article Thyroid Function Test In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Metabolism of thyroid hormones is influenced by acute systemic illnesses including diabetic ketoacidosis. In these cases T3 level is usually decreased and this condition is called “low T3 syndrome” which is usually reversed by treating the under lying Disease. In this cross sectional study thyroid function tests were analyzed in 16 diabetic ketoacidosis patients according to American diabetic association before and after insulin therapy. mean triiodothyronine (T3) level before and after ketoacidosis treatment were 63.2 ± 28.2 ng/dl/and 78.5 ± 26.2 ng/dl (P. value 0.00) respectively and the mean thyroxin level (T4) before and after ketoacidosis were 3.18 ± 1.4 ng/dl and 5.17 ± 2.4 ng/dl (P. value = 0.00) .Mean thyrotropin (TSH) level and triiodothyronine uptake (T3RU) before and after treatment showed no significant difference. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a sever systemic disease which along with reduction in T3 level, T4 level is also decreased and TSH level is normal. The changes in Thyroid hormones are reversed to normal after treatment of ketoacidosis so it is recommended in interpreting results of TFT in these patients we should consider these facts and thyroid function test should be repeated after treatment. Continue reading >>

Exams And Tests For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Exams And Tests For Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis (cont.) The diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis is typically made after the health care practitioner obtains a history, performs a physical examination, and reviews the laboratory tests. Blood tests will be ordered to document the levels of sugar, potassium, sodium, and other electrolytes. Ketone level and kidney function tests along with a blood gas sample (to assess the blood acid level, or pH) are also commonly performed. Other tests may be used to check for conditions that may have triggered the diabetic ketoacidosis, based on the history and physical examination findings. These may include chest X-ray, electrocardiogram (ECG), urine analysis, and possibly a CT scan of the brain. Home care is generally directed toward preventing diabetic ketoacidosis and treating moderately to elevated to high levels of blood sugar. If you have type 1 diabetes, you should monitor your blood sugars as instructed by your health care practitioner. Check these levels more often if you feel ill, if you are fighting an infection, or if you have had a recent illness or injury. Your health care practitioner may recommend treating moderate elevations in blood sugar with additional injections of a short-acting form of insulin. Working with their health care practitioner, people with diabetes should have previously arranged a regimen of extra insulin injections and more frequent blood glucose and urinary ketone monitoring for home treatment as blood sugar levels begin to rise. Be alert for signs of infection and keep yourself well hydrated by drinking sugar free fluids throughout the day. Continue Reading A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis (cont.) Fluid replacement and insulin administration intravenously (IV) are the primary and most critical initial treatments for diabeti Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Continue reading >>

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