diabetestalk.net

Ketoacidosis Can Result In

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Dogs Diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. The term “ketoacidosis,” meanwhile, refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies”. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. This condition typically affects older dogs as well as females. In addition, miniature poodles and dachshunds are predisposed to diabetes with ketoacidosis. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the dog's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your dog’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azo Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Role Of Beta-hydroxybutyric Acid In Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Review

Role Of Beta-hydroxybutyric Acid In Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Review

Go to: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a complication of diabetes mellitus, is a severe metabolic disease that often requires intensive treatment. Diagnosis of ketosis associated with DKA can be difficult due to variability in the metabolic state of DKA patients. Recognition of the clinical signs and definitive diagnosis are essential for proper treatment. This article reviews the formation of ketoacids during DKA and the role of β-hydroxybutyric acid in the diagnosis and monitoring of DKA. Go to: Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe and life threatening metabolic disease caused by an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin in the body (1). A disease of middle-aged dogs and cats, DKA occurs as a complication of diabetes mellitus (1). The clinical presentation can range from ketotic patients that are eating, drinking, and maintaining hydration on their own to the more common ketoacidotic patients that are dehydrated and have other signs such as vomiting, anorexia, and lethargy (1). The intensity of treatment is therefore variable and depends on the severity of clinical signs and the degree of metabolic derangement. Most DKA patients require intensive, in-hospital treatment. Go to: Pathophysiology Decreased insulin production by pancreatic beta cells, decreased activity of insulin receptors at the cellular level, or both, are responsible for the abnormal glucose metabolism and resulting hyperglycemia (1,2). One consequence of this disregulated glucose metabolism is that glucose transport from serum into the cells is inadequate, leading to cellular starvation (1–3). In order to satisfy its cellular energy requirements and maintain cellular integrity, the body utilizes adipose tissue as the main energy source (1,4). This is a protective mechanism designed Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic ketoacidosis is a metabolic complication of alcohol use and starvation characterized by hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis without significant hyperglycemia. Alcoholic ketoacidosis causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Diagnosis is by history and findings of ketoacidosis without hyperglycemia. Treatment is IV saline solution and dextrose infusion. Alcoholic ketoacidosis is attributed to the combined effects of alcohol and starvation on glucose metabolism. Alcohol diminishes hepatic gluconeogenesis and leads to decreased insulin secretion, increased lipolysis, impaired fatty acid oxidation, and subsequent ketogenesis, causing an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis. Counter-regulatory hormones are increased and may further inhibit insulin secretion. Plasma glucose levels are usually low or normal, but mild hyperglycemia sometimes occurs. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion; similar symptoms in an alcoholic patient may result from acute pancreatitis, methanol or ethylene glycol poisoning, or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In patients suspected of having alcoholic ketoacidosis, serum electrolytes (including magnesium), BUN and creatinine, glucose, ketones, amylase, lipase, and plasma osmolality should be measured. Urine should be tested for ketones. Patients who appear significantly ill and those with positive ketones should have arterial blood gas and serum lactate measurement. The absence of hyperglycemia makes DKA improbable. Those with mild hyperglycemia may have underlying diabetes mellitus, which may be recognized by elevated levels of glycosylated Hb (HbA1c). Typical laboratory findings include a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, ketonemia, and low levels of potassium, magnesium, and phosphorus. Detection of acidosis may be com Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis, also called DKA, is a life-threatening complication occurring with undiagnosed and/or untreated Type 1 diabetes in adults and children. DKA symptoms often remain undiagnosed because they can look like (mimic) influenza, a stomach bug, strep infections, and other common illnesses and conditions. However, someone may actually have a common illness and DKA at the same time, causing the common illness symptoms to hide (mask) the underlying DKA symptoms. Either way, untreated Type 1 diabetes and DKA are 100% fatal. ​IMPORTANT: Diabetic ketoacidosis is LIFE-THREATENING and can progress quickly–often within 24 hours! If you or a loved one have any of the following symptoms with VOMITING AND LETHARGY COMBINED WITH LABORED BREATHING, do not consume sugar and seek emergency medical care immediately. Insist medical personnel Test One Drop of blood or urine for glucose (sugar) levels. DKA can be fatal! ​ SYMPTOMS OF DKA: excessive thirst frequent urination or bedwetting increased appetite or sugar cravings abdominal pain irritability, grouchiness, or mood changes headaches and/or vision changes itchy skin/genitals (yeast or thrush) sudden weight loss flushed, hot, dry skin nausea and vomiting* fruity/acetone scented breath* lethargy, drowsiness, or fatigue* labored, rapid, and/or deep breathing* confusion, stupor, or unconsciousness* *A combination of any of these symptoms can be life-threatening. Seek EMERGENCY CARE. When new onset Type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed and untreated the shortage of insulin causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to climb above the normal range. Without adequate insulin to regulate levels of glucose in the blood, high levels of acids called ketones build up in the body causing diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketones are toxic and if l Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

© 1996–2017 themedicalbiochemistrypage.org, LLC | info @ themedicalbiochemistrypage.org Definition of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The most severe and life threatening complication of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is characterized by metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia. Diagnosis of DKA is accomplished by detection of hyperketonemia and metabolic acidosis (as measured by the anion gap) in the presence of hyperglycemia. The anion gap refers to the difference between the concentration of cations other than sodium and the concentration of anions other than chloride and bicarbonate. The anion gap therefore, represents an artificial assessment of the unmeasured ions in plasma. Calculation of the anion gap involves sodium (Na+), chloride (Cl–) and bicarbonate (HCO3–) measurements and it is defined as [Na+ – (Cl– + HCO3–)] where the sodium and chloride concentrations are measured as mEq/L and the bicarbonate concentration is mmol/L. The anion gap will increase when the concentration of plasma K+, Ca2+, or Mg2+ is decreased, when organic ions such as lactate are increased (or foreign anions accumulate), or when the concentration or charge of plasma proteins increases. Normal anion gap is between 8mEq/L and 12mEq/L and a higher number is diagnostic of metabolic acidosis. Rapid and aggressive treatment is necessary as the metabolic acidosis will result in cerebral edema and coma eventually leading to death. The hyperketonemia in DKA is the result of insulin deficiency and unregulated glucagon secretion from α-cells of the pancreas. Circulating glucagon stimulates the adipose tissue to release fatty acids stored in triglycerides. The free fatty acids enter the circulation and are taken up primarily by the liver where Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Emergency Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially fatal metabolic disorder presenting most weeks in most accident and emergency (A&E) departments.1 The disorder can have significant mortality if misdiagnosed or mistreated. Numerous management strategies have been described. Our aim is to describe a regimen that is based, as far as possible, on available evidence but also on our experience in managing patients with DKA in the A&E department and on inpatient wards. A literature search was carried out on Medline and the Cochrane Databases using “diabetic ketoacidosis” as a MeSH heading and as textword. High yield journals were hand searched. Papers identified were appraised in the ways described in the Users’ guide series published in JAMA. We will not be discussing the derangements in intermediary metabolism involved, nor would we suggest extrapolating the proposed regimen to children. Although some of the issues discussed may be considered by some to be outwith the remit of A&E medicine it would seem prudent to ensure that A&E staff were aware of the probable management of such patients in the hours after they leave the A&E department. AETIOLOGY AND DEFINITION DKA may be the first presentation of diabetes. Insulin error (with or without intercurrent illness) is the most common precipitating factor, accounting for nearly two thirds of cases (excluding those where DKA was the first presentation of diabetes mellitus).2 The main features of DKA are hyperglycaemia, metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap and heavy ketonuria (box 1). This contrasts with the other hyperglycaemic diabetic emergency of hyperosmolar non-ketotic hyperglycaemia where there is no acidosis, absent or minimal ketonuria but often very high glucose levels (>33 mM) and very high serum sodium levels (>15 Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ketoacidosis

Diabetes And Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)is a medical emergencycaused high blood glucose levels ( hyperglycaemia ). Ketoacidosis is caused by a lack of insulin to process glucose to use as energy. The body responds by using fat stores for energy instead, releasing damaging ketones into the blood as a by-product. The symptoms of DKA include excessive thirst, nausea or vomiting , dry skin , blurred vision , and rapidbreathing. Without treatment, dehydration is a risk to health. High ketone levels can often be smelled on the breath of a person with DKA, with a nail varnish or pear-drop type aroma. A related condition is a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state, HHS, previously known as HONK: hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma. In this condition, high blood glucose levels cause similar symptoms as DKA, but without the ketones release. Treatment of ketoacidosis requires insulin and fluids as recommended by your doctor. He or she may suggest that you increase the dose of your insulin or change your insulin type to a short-acting form. Your doctor will also suggest you drink more fluids - sugar -free, of course. You will need to check your sugars frequently and repeat the assessment of your urine ketones. Ketoacidosis can result in coma and possibly death if left untreated. To prevent ketoacidosis, take your medication as directed. If you are on an insulin pump always check your tube connections for air bubbles and make sure that there are no leaks of insulin. Also, check your insulin to make sure it isn't past its expiry date and make sure no clumps have formed. Insulin should always be either clear or uniformly cloudy with particles. Seek medical advice if you have repeated abnormal blood sugar levels . Diabetic coma caused by hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state or HHS is a serious co Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Trends In The Prevalence Of Ketoacidosis At Diabetes Diagnosis: The Search For Diabetes In Youth Study

Trends In The Prevalence Of Ketoacidosis At Diabetes Diagnosis: The Search For Diabetes In Youth Study

Abstract OBJECTIVE: To estimate temporal changes in the prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes in youth and to explore factors associated with its occurrence. METHODS: Five centers identified incident cases of diabetes among youth aged 0 to 19 years starting in 2002. DKA presence was defined as a bicarbonate level <15 mmol/L and/or a pH <7.25 (venous) or <7.30 (arterial or capillary) or mention of DKA in the medical records. We assessed trends in the prevalence of DKA over 3 time periods (2002–2003, 2004–2005, and 2008–2010). Logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with DKA. RESULTS: In youth with type 1 diabetes (n = 5615), the prevalence of DKA was high and stable over time (30.2% in 2002–2003, 29.1% in 2004–2005, and 31.1% in 2008–2010; P for trend = .42). Higher prevalence was associated with younger age at diagnosis (P < .0001), minority race/ethnicity (P = .019), income (P = .019), and lack of private health insurance (P = 008). Among youth with type 2 diabetes (n = 1425), DKA prevalence decreased from 11.7% in 2002–2003 to 5.7% in 2008–2010 (P for trend = .005). Higher prevalence was associated with younger age at diagnosis (P = .001), minority race/ethnicity (P = .013), and male gender (P = .001). CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of DKA in youth with type 1 diabetes, although stable, remains high, indicating a persistent need for increased awareness of signs and symptoms of diabetes and better access to health care. In youth with type 2 diabetes, DKA at onset is less common and is decreasing over time. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition and often the presenting symptom of newly diagnosed type 1 or type 2 diabetes in youth. SEARCH previously reported that the prev Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the hallmark of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. DKA is an emergency condition caused by a disturbance in your body’s metabolism. Extremely high blood glucose levels, along with a severe lack of insulin, result in the breakdown of body fat for energy and an accumulation of ketones in the blood and urine. Statistics on Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in between 16%-80% of children presenting with newly diagnosed diabetes. It remains the most common cause of death for young type 1 diabetes sufferers. Before the discovery of insulin, mortality rates were up to 100%. Today, the mortality has fallen to around 2% due to early identification and treatment. Death is usually caused by cerebral oedema (swelling of the brain). DKA is most common in type 1 diabetes sufferers but may also occur in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the latter group usually has at least some functioning insulin so suffer from another disorder called hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma (HONK). DKA tends to occur in individuals younger than 19 years, the more brittle of type 1 diabetic patients. However, DKA can affect diabetic patients of any age or sex. Risk Factors for Diabetic Ketoacidosis People with diabetes lack sufficient insulin, a hormone the body uses to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar) for energy. Therefore in diabetic patients glucose is not available as a fuel, so the body turns to fat stores for energy. However when fats are broken down they produce byproducts called ketones which build up in the blood and can be damaging to the body. In particular, accumulated ketones can “spill” over into the urine and make the blood become more acidic than body tissues (ketoacidosis). Blood gl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetes mellitus is the name given to a group of conditions whose common hallmark is a raised blood glucose concentration (hyperglycemia) due to an absolute or relative deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. In the UK there are 1.4 million registered diabetic patients, approximately 3 % of the population. In addition, an estimated 1 million remain undiagnosed. It is a growing health problem: In 1998, the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted a doubling of the worldwide prevalence of diabetes from 150 million to 300 million by 2025. For a very tiny minority, diabetes is a secondary feature of primary endocrine disease such as acromegaly (growth hormone excess) or Cushing’s syndrome (excess corticosteroid), and for these patients successful treatment of the primary disease cures diabetes. Most diabetic patients, however, are classified as suffering either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for around 15 % of the total diabetic population, is an autoimmune disease of the pancreas in which the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas are selectively destroyed, resulting in an absolute insulin deficiency. The condition arises in genetically susceptible individuals exposed to undefined environmental insult(s) (possibly viral infection) early in life. It usually becomes clinically evident and therefore diagnosed during late childhood, with peak incidence between 11 and 13 years of age, although the autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction begins many years earlier. There is currently no cure and type 1 diabetics have an absolute life-long requirement for daily insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes: around 85 % of the diabetic population has type 2 diabetes. The primary prob Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high Continue reading >>

More in ketosis