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Ketoacidosis Can Result In

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Feline Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Fall 2008 Ketoacidosis is a metabolic imbalance that is most commonly seen as a sequel to unmanaged or poorly regulated diabetes mellitus. It is caused by the breakdown of fat and protein in a compensatory effort for the need of more metabolic energy. The excessive breakdown of these stored reserves creates a toxic by-product in the form of ketones. As ketones build up in the blood stream, pH and electrolyte imbalances proceed. This condition is a potentially life-threatening emergency that requires immediate medical attention. Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disease in geriatric felines. It is caused by a dysfunction in the beta cells of the exocrine pancreas resulting in an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin. Insulin has been called the cells' gatekeeper. It attaches to the surface of cells and permits glucose, the cells' primary energy source, to enter from the blood. A lack of insulin results in a build up of glucose in the blood, physiologically causing a state of cellular starvation. In response to this condition the body begins to increase the mobilization of protein and fat storage. Fatty acids are released from adipose tissue, which are then oxidized by the Continue reading >>

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  1. gear2d

    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH

  2. blade

    USMLE Forums Guru

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gear2d
    Could anyone explain how this occurs? From my understanding high glucose levels draws K+ out of cells (HypERkalemia), low insulin promotes less shift of K+ in to cells (HypERkalemia), and acidosis causes K+ to shift out of cells (hypERkalemia)....so how does DKA cause hyPOkalemia? From my understanding DK:
    High glucose (hypertonicity which cause the shift of K+ to ECF),
    Low insulin
    Low pH Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss

  3. gear2d

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by blade
    Hypokalemia in DKA???which book is that pls?your analysis above is correct but
    In DKA=hyperkalemia but with low intracellular K+ hence in treatment of DKA,you treat as if hypokalemia to restore the intracellular loss This is from Step to Med 3rd ed on page312 in the flow diagram.

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This is how I set up my medical alert bracelet for Mast Cell Disease that I purchased from laurenshope.com with bits of old footage in between. It has been a little longer than usual since I updated. I have been very sick with a virus and reacting to a brand change in my IV supplies. LETS BE FRIENDS: Blog - hospitalprincess.com Instagram - instagram.com/hospitalprncss Twitter - twitter.com/hospitalprncss Facebook - facebook.com/hospitalprincess Etsy - Etsy.com/shop/hospitalroundknits Email - [email protected]

High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

Diabetes has become such a chronic long-term condition that it’s easy to forget about the serious acute complications that can arise, which can lead to a coma or death if not treated. There are only two types of emergencies – having very high glucose and having a very low glucose. The warning signs of an looming coma range from a mild headache to hallucinations.. If not identified or treated both types of emergencies can lead to serious irreversible complications including brain damage, kidney failure and death. When your glucose is very very high The fundamental issue in diabetes is raised blood glucose levels. Medically this is called hyperglycaemia. When glucose rises very rapidly or to very high levels, it can result in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma or a hyperglycaemic coma. Diabetic ketoacidotic coma This happens in type 1 diabetes and the high risk people include children and teens. A person can go into a ketoacidotic coma within a few hours. A person in a ketoacidotic crisis presents with: a complete lack of insulin in the body very high glucose levels dehydration break down of muscle abnormal potassium, sodium and other electrolyte levels. Causes of ketoacidotic crisis o Continue reading >>

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  1. jpallan

    Normally, I'd drink Gatorade, but I'm otherwise doing well and don't want to set things off course. I need something slightly flavoured, has some electrolytes in it, and can take the taste out of my mouth just long enough to throw it back to where I can drink water again. Since this will happen lots of times, I need a long-term solution. I've already kicked caffeine, so I know it's definitely ketosis playing tricks on me.

  2. essexjan

    I find chewing sugar-free gum helps get that taste out when I'm on the Scarsdale or General Motors diets (both low-carb diets). It also gets the saliva going, and makes me feel less thirsty.

  3. that girl

    How about chicken broth? Not really so great on the go, but at home it should work pretty well. You also might be able to make somewhat salty veggie broth or drink that works well cold.
    Is simple lemon juice in water insufficient to make the taste problem go away? Adds flavor but no/negligible carbohydrates.

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Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why lo Continue reading >>

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  1. 2blessed4stress

    metformin and lactic acidosis

    I am hoping that I can get some guidance from the members here. There are many of you that have a wealth of information on diabetes and things related so please bear with me. I went to the doctor yesterday and finally asked her for metformin er and was all set to try it out. Then I read the paper that came with it from the pharmacy. The warning about lactic acidosis stopped me in my tracks. Now I am afraid to take it. I searched the posts her a DD about lactic acidosis and I also found that some members said it caused them to be really fatigued. Another member posted that she had trouble with exercise because it caused leg cramps. I feel so overwhelmed now. I really wanted to try it out I believe it could help me but I don't want to put my life at risk to try it. I looked up lactic acidosis and I was reading about the bloods ph and acid in your blood. I have a problem with uric acid in my blood but I believe that is not related to lactic acidosis. I have had a problem with kidney infections and a lot of crystals in my urine and kidney stones the past year, but I believe my kidney function is ok. Does metformin cause lactic acidosis very often? Are the symptoms of lactic acidosis easy enough to pick up on so it can be caught early. I am sorry I am such a worry wart. Thank you in advance for any guidance/reassurance from you.

  2. furball64801

    All I can tell you is that millions upon millions take met with 0 issues. You are reading the absolute worst side affects. Have you see tv commericails on meds that is any meds. They say could cause heart attack, fatigue, even death no kidding. I been on met and so has my diabetic family and 0 issues other than a tad of diahrea. To me its extemely rare many here are on met me a very very long time on it. What am I saying to me its about the best D med out there other than exercise its free. It is just my opion for what its worth, I know others might have other ideas and of course its is there opinion also. Some take b-12 if they get fatigued on met, I do not get that way, all I can say is to me its as safe as can be.

  3. coravh

    Every drug has potential side effects. Some more common than others. I'm not sure of the exact specifics, but I believe that for a side effect to be listed, it needs to happen in 1% of the people that take it.
    My husband has been on met with no side effects other than a little bit of tummy trouble. I have a dozen local diabetic friends (through volunteer work) that are also on it, and have no side effects. I do have one friend who reacts to everything and has no issues with it. I think i've only seen people with this issue a couple of times after about 15 years online haunting a variety of message boards.
    Take for example my warfarin. It can cause bleeding. Even a baby aspirin can cause this. And it does happen to some people. But the vast majority of folks don't have issues.
    Do you have some history of lactic acidosis? Or is this simply general anxiety over something new?
    All meds are a cost benefit analysis. Do you want to try the drug to alleviate a serious issue ( like high blood sugar) or do you decide to refuse it on the basis of a rare side effect and maybe get into trouble due to glucose issues? Why not try it? Discuss with your phamacist what to look for if you are worried. But basically it is a safe, effective drug.
    Cora

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