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Ketoacidosis Can Result In

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis, also called DKA, is a life-threatening complication occurring with undiagnosed and/or untreated Type 1 diabetes in adults and children. DKA symptoms often remain undiagnosed because they can look like (mimic) influenza, a stomach bug, strep infections, and other common illnesses and conditions. However, someone may actually have a common illness and DKA at the same time, causing the common illness symptoms to hide (mask) the underlying DKA symptoms. Either way, untreated Type 1 diabetes and DKA are 100% fatal. ​IMPORTANT: Diabetic ketoacidosis is LIFE-THREATENING and can progress quickly–often within 24 hours! If you or a loved one have any of the following symptoms with VOMITING AND LETHARGY COMBINED WITH LABORED BREATHING, do not consume sugar and seek emergency medical care immediately. Insist medical personnel Test One Drop of blood or urine for glucose (sugar) levels. DKA can be fatal! ​ SYMPTOMS OF DKA: excessive thirst frequent urination or bedwetting increased appetite or sugar cravings abdominal pain irritability, grouchiness, or mood changes headaches and/or vision changes itchy skin/genitals (yeast or thrush) sudden weight loss flushed, hot, dry skin nausea and vomiting* fruity/acetone scented breath* lethargy, drowsiness, or fatigue* labored, rapid, and/or deep breathing* confusion, stupor, or unconsciousness* *A combination of any of these symptoms can be life-threatening. Seek EMERGENCY CARE. When new onset Type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed and untreated the shortage of insulin causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to climb above the normal range. Without adequate insulin to regulate levels of glucose in the blood, high levels of acids called ketones build up in the body causing diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketones are toxic and if l Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetes mellitus is the name given to a group of conditions whose common hallmark is a raised blood glucose concentration (hyperglycemia) due to an absolute or relative deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. In the UK there are 1.4 million registered diabetic patients, approximately 3 % of the population. In addition, an estimated 1 million remain undiagnosed. It is a growing health problem: In 1998, the World Health Organization (WHO) predicted a doubling of the worldwide prevalence of diabetes from 150 million to 300 million by 2025. For a very tiny minority, diabetes is a secondary feature of primary endocrine disease such as acromegaly (growth hormone excess) or Cushing’s syndrome (excess corticosteroid), and for these patients successful treatment of the primary disease cures diabetes. Most diabetic patients, however, are classified as suffering either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for around 15 % of the total diabetic population, is an autoimmune disease of the pancreas in which the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas are selectively destroyed, resulting in an absolute insulin deficiency. The condition arises in genetically susceptible individuals exposed to undefined environmental insult(s) (possibly viral infection) early in life. It usually becomes clinically evident and therefore diagnosed during late childhood, with peak incidence between 11 and 13 years of age, although the autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction begins many years earlier. There is currently no cure and type 1 diabetics have an absolute life-long requirement for daily insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes This is the most common form of diabetes: around 85 % of the diabetic population has type 2 diabetes. The primary prob Continue reading >>

Dka In Hypoglycemia

Dka In Hypoglycemia

#2 0 They are two different entities. While they will both cause acidosis the mechanism of acidosis is different. DKA is from ketosis and acidosis from Hypoglycamia is lactic acid. Is this what you are asking? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment by eMedicineHealth.com An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sug Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening medical condition that is a complication of diabetes mellitus that is not in control. It is more common among type 1 diabetics that have no insulin but it can also be seen in severe cases of type 2 diabetes. In diabetic ketoacidosis, there are ketones in the bloodstream and urine because the fat in the body is broken down with ketones as a byproduct. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body isn’t making enough insulin by the pancreatic islet cells. In a normal person, insulin is secreted by the pancreas in response to elevated blood sugar levels. The insulin helps glucose (sugar) to enter the cells to be used as cellular fuel. If insulin is absent, the body breaks down fatty acids to be used for fuel. Ketones build up in the urine and blood, leading to the condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis. The main cause is being a type 1 diabetic who has not taken enough insulin. Symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis can come on suddenly, within a day or so of having no insulin. When signs and symptoms do show up, the patient may have any or all of the following symptoms: Confusion Breath that smells fruity Shortness of breath Tiredness or weakness Pain in the abdomen Nausea and vomiting Increased frequency of urination Being excessively thirsty Clinical signs that the individual has diabetic ketoacidosis includes have extremely high blood sugar levels as well as elevated levels of ketones in the urine. Causes of Diabetic Ketoacidosis The main source of cellular fuel is glucose. All of the cells of the body rely on glucose to make energy to allow the cells to function in whatever capacity they happen to be in. When insulin is lacking, the body is unable to use glucose as fuel. These caus Continue reading >>

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Why Is There Hyperkalemia In Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Lack of insulin, thus no proper metabolism of glucose, ketones form, pH goes down, H+ concentration rises, our body tries to compensate by exchanging K+ from inside the cells for H+ outside the cells, hoping to lower H+ concentration, but at the same time elevating serum potassium. Most people are seriously dehydrated, so are in acute kidney failure, thus the kidneys aren’t able to excrete the excess of potassium from the blood, compounding the problem. On the other hand, many in reality are severely potassium depleted, so once lots of fluid so rehydration and a little insulin is administered serum potassium will plummet, so needs to be monitored 2 hourly - along with glucose, sodium and kidney function - to prevent severe hypokalemia causing fatal arrhythmias, like we experienced decades ago when this wasn’t so well understood yet. In practice, once the patient started peeing again, we started adding potassium chloride to our infusion fluids, the surplus potassium would be peed out by our kidneys so no risk for hyperkalemia. Continue reading >>

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: diabetes medicines (such as in Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an extreme medical emergency that requires immediate veterinary attention. The condition can result in an accumulation of fluid in the brain and lungs, renal failure or heart failure. Affected animals that are not treated are likely to die. With timely intervention and proper treatment, it is likely that an affected cat can recover with little to no side effects. Diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas fails to produce sufficient insulin, creating an inability to efficiently process the sugars, fats, and proteins needed for energy. The resulting build-up of sugar causes extreme thirst and frequent urination. Since sugar levels help to control appetite, affected animals may experience a spike in hunger and lose weight at the same time due to the inability to properly process nutrients. In extreme cases, diabetes may be accompanied by a condition known as ketoacidosis. This is a serious ailment that causes energy crisis and abnormal blood-acid levels in affected pets. Cats affected with diabetic ketoacidosis are likely to present with one or more of the following symptoms: Vomiting Weakness Lethargy Depression Excessive Thirst Refusal to drink water Refusal to eat Sudden weight loss Loss of muscle tone Increased urination Dehydration Rough coat Dandruff Rapid breathing Sweet-smelling breath Jaundice The exact cause of diabetes in cats is unknown, but it is often accompanied by obesity, chronic pancreatitis, hormonal disease, or the use of corticosteroids like Prednisone. Ketoacidosis, the buildup of ketone waste products in the blood that occurs when the body burns fat and protein for energy instead of using glucose, is caused by insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis is commonly preceded by other conditions including: Stress Surgery Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

What’s The Difference Between Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Ketosis and ketoacidosis sound similar and are sometimes confused, but don’t mistake these conditions for one another. These involve two different sets of circumstances with considerably different outlooks. Both are triggered by an increase of ketones in the body, which are acids released into the bloodstream when the body burns fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. But it’s how the body responds to this increase that sets ketosis and ketoacidosis apart from each other. RELATED: How to Tell the Difference Between Good and Bad Carbs What Is Ketosis and How Does the Process Work? “Ketosis is a natural state that occurs when you start to metabolize fat instead of sugar,” says Michael Greenfield, MD, endocrinologist and chief medical officer at El Camino Hospital in Palo Alto, California. “It occurs often when people fast and use up the stores of sugar in their body." To understand ketosis, it helps to understand how the body burns energy. Carbohydrates and fat are both energy sources, and the body typically burns carbs (sugar or glucose) first, and then fat. If there aren’t enough carbohydrates in your system, it begins to break down fat for energy, which puts your body into a state of ketosis. While in this state, the body becomes a fat-burning machine. For this reason, ketosis is the goal of many diets, particularly those that restrict carbohydrate intake and rely on fat for energy, such as the ketogenic diet. Understanding the Relationship Between the Ketogenic Diet and Ketosis “The ketogenic diet is a high-fat (60 to 80 percent of your total daily calories), moderate-protein (10 to 15 percent of your total daily calories), and low-carbohydrate diet (less than 10 percent of your total daily calories) that forces your body into ketosis, where it burns fa Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: Understanding The Differences

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: Understanding The Differences

Introduction to Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis Historically, ketosis has been one of the most vaguely defined and poorly understood concepts of the last century. There are different scenarios in which are body can be in a state of ketosis (including ketoacidosis). The most basic definition of ketosis is a general increase in blood levels of ketone bodies to 0.5 mmol or above. However, the reasons for the development of ketosis, the resultant levels of blood ketones, and the associated outcomes (health versus possible death) differ drastically between different situations of ketosis. Failure to understand the differences between various incidents of ketosis has led to the common misconceptions we have today that ultimately has made educating the masses on the ketogenic diet difficult. The single most important take home from this article should be that diabetic ketoacidosis is not the same as the ketosis experienced from a ketogenic diet. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Whenever I speak about ketogenic dieting, almost inevitably I am asked the question: “But shouldn’t you be worried about going into a state of ketoacidosis?” Ketoacidosis occurs when the formation ketone bodies are uncontrolled (15-25 mmol) and acidity in the blood increases (1). It is important to understand that our body regulates blood acid concentrations tightly. We typically measure blood acidity vs. alkalinity using the pH scale. If your blood’s pH is less than 7 it is acidic, and if greater it is basic, or alkaline. Our blood is usually slightly alkaline with a pH ranging from 7.35 to 7.45. Any deviation up or down from the norm by even the smallest amount can prove fatal! The most common form of ketoacidosis to occur is known as diabetic ketoacidosis. This usually occurs in type I diabetics but can also oc Continue reading >>

High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

Diabetes has become such a chronic long-term condition that it’s easy to forget about the serious acute complications that can arise, which can lead to a coma or death if not treated. There are only two types of emergencies – having very high glucose and having a very low glucose. The warning signs of an looming coma range from a mild headache to hallucinations.. If not identified or treated both types of emergencies can lead to serious irreversible complications including brain damage, kidney failure and death. When your glucose is very very high The fundamental issue in diabetes is raised blood glucose levels. Medically this is called hyperglycaemia. When glucose rises very rapidly or to very high levels, it can result in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma or a hyperglycaemic coma. Diabetic ketoacidotic coma This happens in type 1 diabetes and the high risk people include children and teens. A person can go into a ketoacidotic coma within a few hours. A person in a ketoacidotic crisis presents with: a complete lack of insulin in the body very high glucose levels dehydration break down of muscle abnormal potassium, sodium and other electrolyte levels. Causes of ketoacidotic crisis or coma A person who hasn’t been diagnosed with diabetes as yet Missing an insulin dose Illness such as gastroenteritis, nausea and vomiting Not adjusting insulin when glucose is high What to look out for if you suspect you may be going into a ketoacidotic crisis or coma Shortness of breath Fruity smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Severe fatigue Abdominal pain and headache Thirst Passing urine more often. Danger signs to watch out for Slurred speech Blurred vision Reduced concentration Coma. What you must do if yoususpect you may be going into a ketoacidotic crisis or coma Get to a casualty Continue reading >>

Case Report On Bell’s Palsy And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Due To Uncontrolled Diabetes

Case Report On Bell’s Palsy And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Due To Uncontrolled Diabetes

Department of Pharmacy Practice, St. Peters Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal, India *Corresponding Author: Vatipelli M St. Peters Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal, India Tel: 919849405154 E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Vatipelli M, Pathan AB (2016) Case Report on Bell’s Palsy and Diabetic Ketoacidosis due to Uncontrolled Diabetes. J Clin Case Rep 6:847. doi:10.4172/2165-7920.1000847 Copyright: © 2016 Vatipelli M, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Clinical Case Reports Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition seen in diabetes in which body cannot use glucose as a fuel instead uses fat and produces ketones (chemicals) and finally results in diabetic ketoacidosis. Bell's palsy is a sudden weakness or paralysis of the muscles on one side of the face due to mal-function of cranial nerve VII (facial nerve), which stimulates the facial muscles. Bell's palsy affects about 23 of 1,00,000 people at some time. The cause of Bell's palsy is unknown, but it may involve swelling of the facial nerve as a reaction to an immune disorder or a viral infection. Swelling causes the nerve to be compressed and its blood supply to be reduced. In this case facial nerve has got damaged due to diabetic ketoacidosis (mononeuropathy). Risk factors are the virus that have been linked to Bell's palsy include the virus that causes: cold sores and genital herpes (herpes simplex), chickenpox and shingles (herpes zoster), mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr), cytomegalovirus infections, respira Continue reading >>

The Influence Of Ketoacids On Plasma Creatinine Assays In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Influence Of Ketoacids On Plasma Creatinine Assays In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Abstract. Kemperman FAW, Weber JA, Gorgels J, van Zanten AP, Krediet RT, Arisz L (University of Amsterdam and Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). The influence of ketoacids on plasma creatinine assays in diabetic ketoacidosis. J Intern Med 2000; 248: 513–519. Objective. Analysis of the interference of ketoacids on various routine plasma creatinine assays during a clinical episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Design. Observational study. Blood samples were drawn before, during and after standard in-hospital treatment. Plasma creatinine was measured with two dissimilar enzymatic assays (creatininase PAP + and creatinine iminohydrolase Serapak), a kinetic alkaline picrate method (Jaffé) and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure. Acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate were analysed by enzymatic methods. Setting. Department of Medicine, University Hospital. Subjects. Nine patients who experienced 10 episodes of DKA. Main outcome measures. Agreement of the routine plasma creatinine assays with HPLC and analysis of possible interferents. Results. At presentation, the Jaffé assay gave falsely high values of plasma creatinine (median 99 µmol L–1), in contrast to the PAP+ (median 60.5 µmol L–1) and HPLC assays (median 67.5 µmol L–1). This positive error decreased during treatment. This was due to a decrease in acetoacetate, as the positive error by the Jaffé method correlated with the acetoacetate concentration (r = 0.79, P < 0.0001). In the multiple regression analysis, β-hydroxybutyrate caused no additional interference by the Jaffé assay, confirmed by in vitro experiments. Analysis of agreement showed that the difference between PAP+ and HPLC creatinine was – 4.6 ± 3.0 µmol L–1 (mean ± SD), and 2.0 ± 5.3 µmol Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis

Ketoacidosis

Ketones in the urine, as detected by urine testing stix or a blood ketone testing meter[1], may indicate the beginning of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a dangerous and often quickly fatal condition caused by low insulin levels combined with certain other systemic stresses. DKA can be fixed if caught quickly. Diabetics of all species therefore need to be checked for ketones with urine testing stix, available at any pharmacy, whenever insulin level may be too low, and any of the following signs or triggers are present: Ketone Monitoring Needed: Little or no insulin in last 12 hours High blood sugar over 16 mmol/L or 300 mg/dL (though with low insulin, lower as well...) Dehydration (skin doesn't jump back after pulling a bit gums are tacky or dry)[2] Not eating for over 12 hours due to Inappetance or Fasting Vomiting Lethargy Infection or illness High stress levels Breath smells like acetone (nail-polish remover) or fruit. Note that the triggers and signs are somewhat interchangeable because ketoacidosis is, once begun, a set of vicious circles which will make itself worse. So dehydration, hyperglycemia, fasting, and presence of ketones are not only signs, they're also sometimes triggers. In a diabetic, any urinary ketones above trace, or any increase in urinary ketone level, or trace urinary ketones plus some of the symptoms above, are cause to call an emergency vet immediately, at any hour of the day. Possible False Urine Ketone Test Results Drugs and Supplements Valproic Acid (brand names) Depakene, Depakote, Divalproex Sodium[3] Positive. Common use: Treatment of epilepsy. Cefixime/Suprax[4] Positive with nitroprusside-based urine testing. Common use: Antibiotic. Levadopa Metabolites[5] Positive with high concentrations[6]. Tricyclic Ring Compounds[7][8] Positive. Commo Continue reading >>

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