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Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

While food trends come and go, high-fat diets—lauded for their weight-loss potential and brain-function benefits—have proven to have some staying power. Functional medicine M.D. Sara Gottfried contributes frequently to goop on the topic of weight-loss resistance. She’s spent the past two years rigorously studying the ketogenic diet—high-fat, low-carb, moderate-protein. Named for ketones, which Gottfried explains are “the energy source made by the body when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energy demand,” the goal of the diet is to get the body to burn fat instead of sugar. Gottfried recommends the keto diet (as it’s commonly called) to help with a range of brain and focus issues—she finds ketones to be “very efficient fuel for the brain”; she also says it works well for some patients (not all) who want to lose weight but have trouble kicking sugar cravings. We talked to her about who the keto diet is right for (and whom, or when, it isn’t); the nutritional ins and outs of mastering it; and which keto-friendly meals are healthy for practically everyone, regardless of what diet we do (or don’t) practice. A Q&A with Sara Gottfried, M.D. Q What is ketosis? A In most circles, ketosis refers to nutritional ketosis, an optimized state in which you burn fat instead of sugar. Nutritional ketosis has been used to treat epilepsy since the 1920’s and its popularity for mental acuity and weight loss has surged recently. More technically, ketosis refers to a metabolic state in which most of your body’s energy comes from ketones in the blood, as opposed to glycolysis, in which energy supply comes from blood glucose. Ketones are the energy source made by the body (in the liver) when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energ Continue reading >>

Keto 101

Keto 101

Ratio, Ratio, Where for Art Thou, Ratio? The first step in utilizing a ketogenic diet is to calculate your ideal ketogenic ratio, that is, your ideal ratio of total fat (in grams) to total carbs plus protein (in grams) that keeps you in nutritional ketosis. There are two main things that require management with ketogenic eating, macronutrient ratios and thresholds. To put it more simply, in what combination do you need to eat fat, carbs, and protein, and what are your individual limits of each? To get started, if you can figure out your ratio you will then pretty easily be able to figure out your thresholds. As far as your ratio goes, here are some very over-simplified guidelines. Different people have different ratios (for weight loss), but generally-speaking, here are some generic example scenarios: Teenagers: 1:1 20-Somethings: 2:1 (this is basically the old-school Atkins diet) Middle-Aged Folks: 3:1 (this is basically new-school Atkins, this is what I do, a late-30’s slightly-insulin-resistant male) Older Folks, or People with Difficult Metabolic Issues: 4:1 (this is typically the epilepsy or other medical-needs diet) What I believe will work for most people is a 3:1 ratio. You may be able to get away with a 2:1 ratio, or you may require a 4:1 ratio (especially if you are doing ketogenic for medical reasons). OK, What Do Those Ratios Mean? To calculate ratios you take total fat relative to the total carbs plus total protein for every meal. Notice I did not say net carbs. There are almost as many schools of thought about strictness of ratios as they are people airing them. My opinion is that every gram counts, no matter what it is. Fiber, artificial sweeteners, I count all of it. There is lots of argument about this but this is what works for me so it’s my $.02. Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator – Low Carb Macro Calculator

Keto Calculator – Low Carb Macro Calculator

Are you eating a low carb or ketogenic diet or want to start? Perfect! We’re going to guide you through the steps you need to take to figure out how much you should be eating depending on your goals! This is a highly individualized macro calculator and will be tailored to you and only you! Using this Macro Calculator Knowing how many calories you need to eat as well as your macronutrient numbers is important for your success in weight loss or weight gain goals! Generally, you want to keep below 50 grams of carbs to stay in ketosis, but how about your fat and protein? Use our macro calculator to find out exactly what your daily macronutrients and calorie intake should look like. After all, calories are not created equal! You can read more about Calories vs. Macros if you’re interested! Know your Body Fat Percentage To use this calculator you’ll need a rough estimate of your body fat percentage. This is important because the macro calculator uses your lean weight (total weight minus body fat) to calculate the macronutrients you need on a daily basis. Use our body fat percentage guide to understand how to get this number. Now that you know what you should be eating every day you can learn more about macros or just jump straight to our delicious low carb recipes! Continue reading >>

Macro Calculator

Macro Calculator

Body Composition Set your current weight, in pounds or kilograms, and your bodyfat percentage. (How to visually estimate bodyfat %) Activity Level (not counting exercise): Set your usual activity level. This does not include additional exercise like gym, running, etc. If not known, choose Sedentary. Choose "Custom" to set your TDEE manually. Multipliers for activities are taken from Chapter 8 of "Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism, 5th Edition" Daily Calories Set your goal to get your recommended calorie intake. If you used the Exercise Info section above, then you can compare calories for those days that you exercise and those that you don't. It is not recommended to go over 25% deficit for fat loss or over 15% surplus for muscle gain. Daily Exercise Info If needed, set your exercise information for those days that you will be exercising. (Click here for Kcal / min calculations). This will allow you to compare calorie limits on those days that you exercise against those that you don't. Activity Minutes Kcal burned / min Total Kcal burned Weights Cardio Other Daily Macros Adjust your protein ratio: To maintain muscle, leave protein ratio between 0.69 to 0.8. It is not recommended to drop below 0.69 or muscle loss may occur. To gain muscle, the protein ratio should be between 0.8 to 1.2. There is normally no advantage to consuming more than 0.82g/lb (1.8g/kg) of protein per day to preserve or build muscle once you're past the novice level as a natural trainee. Source. Adjust the carbs and fat grams to reach daily calorie goals. If doing a Standard Ketogenic Diet, carbs should be set lower than 30g: It is suggested you count carbs as TOTAL for all foods, except for green veggies and avocado, on those count as NET. Protein Ratio Macronutrients Macro Grams Kcal per gra Continue reading >>

About 2 Keto Dudes

About 2 Keto Dudes

Two middle-aged men One in the USA One in Australia Both overweight Both diagnosed with type 2 diabetes Both convinced they've been fooled Eating fat does not make you fat High insulin levels make you fat Journey with them Learn the facts Reverse diabetes Live well Latest Episode: 2018 Holiday Hangout 65 minutes Hang out with the dudes and their keto friends Brenda Zorn, Kim Howerton, Daisy Brackenhall, and Nick Mailer. Listen Richard Morris It started in 2003 in Las Vegas when Richard (born 1965) gave up smoking under his doctors' supervision (using drugs). He compensated by eating just enough more to put on about 20lbs. Doctors told Richard his triglycerides were getting high and so he should diet. He started drinking SlimFast nutritionally complete meal replacements. At his next blood test he found out he was pre-diabetic and was referred to an internist who got him on metformin and statins. Then, his glycemic control worsened. So, they upped the drugs. His blood pressure started marching north, so he reduced all salt in his diet. Shortly after, Richard met the Atkins low carb high protein diet. That was 2005, the height of the first low carb diet craze when supermarkets were switching from selling bread to low carb wraps, and fast food joints were doing low carb breakfast bowls. After 3 months of Atkins, Richard's blood glucose was normal, his lipids were normal, and his blood pressure had normalized. He figured he was cured! He took a victory lap and moved to Australia, retiring from software development to concentrate on getting his health back. He'd do it by exercising and eating clean - which meant learning to cook, and to grow food, and to do things like hand make cheese. Fast forward 10 years. Richard had a personal trainer working him ragged for 3 x 30 minute Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: The Complete Beginner’s Guide

Ketogenic Diet: The Complete Beginner’s Guide

The ketogenic diet (also known as the keto diet) is a way of eating where you actively help your body burn the excess fat that it has already stored. In order to do that, the amount of carbohydrates that you consume per day is limited (to 20-25 g of net carbs/day), and fat and protein make up the rest of your caloric intake. When you limit the amount of carbs (i.e. sugar and starches) that you are consuming, you enter a state called “nutritional ketosis”: your body can no longer rely on carbohydrates for its energy needs and it now needs to start burning fat as its primary fuel source. As a result, blood glucose remains much more stable throughout the day, and many people report increased energy and lower appetite, which makes it easier to control the amount of food you’re eating. The ketogenic diet was primarily designed as a treatment for epilepsy and is nowadays most often used for weight loss (1). It has multiple benefits that go beyond weight control, such as improving blood sugar regulation and insulin sensitivity, lowering the risk of Type 2 Diabetes and of heart disease, and it possibly even protecting against cancer. In this article, we’ll explain you the basics of the ketogenic diet and help you get started. Feel free to save this guide by pinning it to your Pinterest account or sharing it on your social media to read later. Continue reading >>

Configuring Mfp

Configuring Mfp

Note: New to keto? Check out the eBooks section for more info on what its all about! Update: The latest working script is by /u/Surye on Reddit and its located here: Calorie counting websites are a great tool for the low carb or keto dieter. They are utilized to track the number of calories that you are putting into your food and therefore into your body. There are the obvious benefits such as knowing exactly how many carbs you have eaten or how many calories you have consumed. There are also other side benefits of using these sites like learning more about food, how it affects your body and whether it is beneficial to your health. A few websites that ketards often use are: MyFitnessPal – One of the most popular and the one I personally use. Has the ability to track calories, exercise and measurements such as weight, hips, legs, etc. Also incorporates mobile apps The Daily Plate (Livestrong) – Similar to MFP Many others on the internet So, why use a calorie counter? Here are a few things that are common before counting calories: Hidden Carbs: Items that you incorrectly believe have 0 carbs because why would they put carbs in them? Portion Size: That ice cream really was good! Too bad one pint was actually 4 servings! Manufacturers intentionally list small serving sizes to get the numbers low. Lying to yourself: Sure, I only ate 1/4 cup of almonds MFP is a great tool, but you only get what you put into it. Lets first look at how we should setup MFP for the ideal Ketogenic diet: Create an account at www.myfitnesspal.com Set your macros properly: My Home -> Goals -> Change Goals Select Custom and hit continue Set the Macros for keto. AKA Carbs to 5%, Protein to 30% and Fat to 65% Set the total calories relative to your total burn. Their estimate is decent but you can s Continue reading >>

Calculating Protein Needs For Your Ideal Body Weight

Calculating Protein Needs For Your Ideal Body Weight

Ideal Body Weight (IBW) is based on your height: Males: Protein in g/day of IBW = 50 g (for the first 5 feet of height) + 2.3 g for each inch over 5 feet. (This lets you calculate the average male needs that are approximately 1.2 g per kg of ideal body weight per day.) Females: Protein in kg/day of IBW = 45.5 g (for the first 5 feet of height) + 2.3 g for each inch over 5 feet. (This lets you calculate the average female needs 1.0 g per kg of ideal body weight per day.) Example: A 6 foot male’s protein calculation for IBW would be 50 g of protein (for the first 5 feet )+ 27.6 g (2.3 g x 12 inches) = 77.6 g A 5 foot 4 inch females protein calculation for IBW would be 45.5 g (for the first 5 feet) + 9.2 g (2.3 g x 4 inches) = 54.7 g. If you are exercising more than 60 minutes 5 days per week then the values above should be multiplied by 1.4 grams per kg for females and 1.6 grams per kg for males. Heavy Exerciser Protein Calculation Example: 6 foot male’s base protein needs: 77.6 g per day. 77.6 g x 1.6 = 124.5 g max 5′ 4″ female’s base protein needs: 54.7. g per day 54.7 g x 1.4 = 76.6 grams per day max If you eat three times per day, then simply divide your protein needed for you IBW by 3 to get the maximum protein you need per meal. I hope that helps. Continue reading >>

The Anatomy Of A Keto Diet That Gets Results

The Anatomy Of A Keto Diet That Gets Results

If you’re looking to start a ketogenic diet, look no further… Here is a complete guide that will show you how to start a keto diet without messing around with any of that “complicated” stuff. There are more than 4000 words of the best keto info, and if I were you, I’d make time to read it all. By the end of reading this guide, you will know more about the ketogenic diet than 99% of people. Let’s get started! What is a Ketogenic Diet? A ketogenic diet (keto diet) is low carb diet that is designed to help your body burn fat more efficiently. It focuses on restricting carbs, eating sufficient amount of protein, and consuming fat for satiety. Other low carb diets, like South Beach and Atkins, do not restrict protein intake, where standard ketogenic diet focuses on consuming protein goal in the range of 0.6-0.8 grams per pound of your lean body mass. The ketogenic diet has been practiced for thousands of years without people fully understanding the underlying biochemistry of it. Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, using ketogenic diet in the form of fasting. In the 1920s ketogenic diet became very popular in treating epilepsy. Back then, keto diet consisted of low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with fasting. In the 1920s Mynie Peterman established the standard ketogenic diet for children with epilepsy with 10-15 grams of carbs per day, 1 gram of protein per kilo of mass per day, and the rest of calories from fat. The results in epilepsy patients are indeed astounding. 50% of patients improved their seizures and 33% became seizure-free. Later scientists discovered other health benefits of a ketogenic diet, like weight loss, enhanced endurance and performance, and an incredible response to patients with other health issues. These a Continue reading >>

Preparing For Keto Os

Preparing For Keto Os

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never disregard professional medical advice, or delay in seeking it, because of something you have read on this website. Never rely on information on this website in place of seeking professional medical advice. schaffermethod.com is not responsible or liable for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information, services or products that you obtain through this site. You are encouraged to consult with your doctor with regard to this information contained on or through this website. After reading articles, watching videos or reading other content from this website, you are encouraged to review the information carefully with your professional healthcare provider. PERSONAL DISCLAIMER I am not a doctor. The information I provide is based on my personal experience, thorough studies in exercise science, MAT and and my experience as a Personal Trainer. Any recommendations I make about weight training, nutrition, supplements or lifestyle should be discussed between you and your doctor because working out involves risks. Continue reading >>

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To Keto

The Definitive Guide To Keto

I use my Los Angeles surroundings as a barometer for changes in the mainstream approach to health, and it holds up quite well. Silicon Valley can claim to be the cradle of technology, but L.A. is definitely the cradle of diet and fitness trends; and the latest is most definitely keto. At the local cafe where every species of Malibu fitness enthusiast gathers to gossip and fuel up, I’m seeing fewer gels and energy bars, and way more butter coffees and discarded packets of the new powdered ketone supplement products. Sure enough, keto is entering into mainstream health consciousness everywhere. Google searches for “ketogenic diet” are at an all-time high. The stream of keto-related email queries and comments I receive has seen a major uptick. And early this year, a major publisher approached me with a keto book proposal, which I accepted. I dove headlong into a total immersion/participatory journalism experience where I walked my talk, and pricked my finger for blood tests enough times to get a little scar tissue going, for the past several months. The book is called The Keto Reset Diet and it’s coming out October 3rd. This is a comprehensive presentation to educate you on the science and benefits of ketone burning and to give you step-by-step guidance to go keto the right away, avoiding the common setbacks that happen when many adopt an ill-advised approach to something as delicate and rigorous as nutritional ketosis. You can pre-order a copy from major retailers right now. We are also filming a comprehensive online multimedia educational course to give you a guided immersion experience that will be available in 2018. Meanwhile, it’s definitely time to do a Definitive Guide…. To understand ketogenic diets, you must understand the conditions that promote ketos Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

What Do Keto Kids Eat?

What Do Keto Kids Eat?

On the ketogenic diet at a 3:1 ratio, Nora ate about 1200 calories per day. Broken down into grams, that is 10 grams of net carbohydrates, 28 grams of protein, and 115 grams of fat. Quick note on net carbs: you can take total carbs (starch and sugar) in a food and subtract the fiber because it moves right through the body without raising blood sugar. Fiber is awesome! Net carbs are strictly limited to 10 grams, so any wiggle room in the target amounts comes from varying protein and fat. A 3:1 ratio means that Nora ate 3 grams of fat for every gram of carb + protein, so if she eats just 1 more gram of protein, I need to provide 3 more grams of fat. But that adds up to extra calories very fast. One gram of protein has 4 calories (carbs also have 4 calories per gram), while 1 gram of fat has 9 calories. So if she gets an extra gram of protein plus 3 grams of fat, that adds 31 calories (4 calories from protein + 27 calories from fat) to her diet. Considering that the keto diet is also calorie restricted—too many calories can interfere with ketosis and seizure control—we have to stick to these numbers fairly closely. The traditional ketogenic diet sets a strict limit on carbs, protein and fat for each meal and snack, but our delivery of the diet is modified to allow some flexibility in each meal. We just try to keep it fairly even through the day until reaching the correct breakdowns by the end of the day. It requires some planning ahead and having targets, but allows flexibility. Each family should decide what works best for them and work with their dietician. To get started, it is probably best to stick to simple meal plans, especially meals that your child likes. As you get comfortable you could add new foods and flexibility to the diet when you need it. One modificat Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

You likely already know cutting the carbs is important on a keto diet, but protein intake matters, too! One of the biggest mistakes people run into when going and staying keto is eating too much protein. So, you might be left with the question: How much protein can you eat on a ketogenic diet? Let’s cover how you can avoid the mistake of consuming too much protein and exactly how much of it you can eat on a ketogenic diet. Eating Protein on the Ketogenic Diet A great appeal of the ketogenic diet is getting to eat plenty of foods that are filling and satisfying. Those foods include rich, fatty animal proteins. But how much of these proteins is the right amount? To answer that question, you need to understand how proteins work within the ketogenic diet and why it’s important to monitor your amounts for the best results. The Role of Protein in Ketosis Protein is an important building block of life; we need them to provide our bodies with all of the essential amino acids. Proteins are important for many different actions in the body, including regulation and function of the organs and tissues. Obviously, it’s important to make sure you’re getting enough of these complex molecules. The problem is that when you’re eating a ketogenic diet, it can be pretty easy to eat a lot of foods high in protein. You’re almost eliminating an entire macronutrient group from your diet (carbohydrates), so those new to keto might simply replace the carbs with more protein-rich foods. This is where you have to be careful, because more protein is not always better—in fact, it can keep you out of ketosis. A common misconception is that the ketogenic diet is a high protein diet—it’s not. It’s a high-fat, moderate-protein, and low-carb diet. Why Eating Too Much Protein is Bad Ket Continue reading >>

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