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Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 171 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1534 kcal 5 % 18 % 77 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 144 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1294 kcal 6 % 21 % 73 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 117 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1054 kcal 7 % 24 % 69 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 91 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 814 kcal 8 % 29 % 63 % We have open-sourced KetoDiet Buddy, you can now find it on Github. What is the Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. The exact amount of fat and protein is a matter of individual body responses and activity levels. However, most people on ketogenic diets don't consume over 5% of calories from carbohydrates. In most cases, you won’t need to count calories on a ketogenic diet. However, if you find it hard to lose weight or you are relatively fit and trying to lose a small amount of fat, you may also have to count calories. If you just started following a low-carb diet, don't forget to read my free Guide to Keto & Paleo Diet which includes a print-friendly PDF version! You will find all the information you need, including the keto food list and tips on how to follow the diet to achieve your goals. Maintenance Level Maintenance Level, also known as Total Energy Expenditure, is a level at which you maintain a stable bodyweight. According to Lyle McDonald: Maintenance Level = BMR + TEA + TEF where: BMR is the Basal Metabolic Rate, TEA is the Thermal Effect of Activity and TEF is the Thermal Effect of Feeding Basal Metabolic Rate is the amount of energy expended daily at rest. BMR Continue reading >>

Complete Guide To Intermittent Fasting

Complete Guide To Intermittent Fasting

Before I gave up grains, sugar and other foods which I used to believe were healthy (or at least not harmful), I had breakfast every single day. At least that's what all kinds of TV ads were claiming, promoting whole grains and cereals and other "healthy" breakfast options often loaded with sugar. Just the thought of skipping a meal made me feel guilty. Doing a full day fast seemed unnecessary and impossible to follow. But all this has just been part of the big high-carb, low-fat campaign. Myth #1: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. As you will learn in this post, nothing can be further from the truth. I rarely eat breakfast - that's the meal I skip almost every day. Myth #2: You have to eat regularly, ideally 5 small meals a day. Once you get keto-adapted and not depended on glucose, this will change. Since your insulin levels will not spike, you won't have the need to eat regularly or in small portions (apart from diabetics which I discuss later in this post). Myth #3: You need to eat most of your carbs for breakfast because that's when your body uses them most effectively. You should try to eat your carbs throughout the day and not just in one meal. Furthermore, since our body is in fat-burning state in the morning, eating carbs in the second half of the day is more beneficial for weight loss. Myth #4: Never exercise on an empty stomach. It's bad for your performance and you'll lose muscles instead of body fat. As described below, for most people Intermittent Fasting is ideal for maximising the benefits of exercise for several reasons. What is Intermittent Fasting (IF)? Compared to calorie restriction, IF is not restricted in calories - it simply limits your eating windows to just a few hours a day. In effect, you usually fast for 14-20 hours or even up Continue reading >>

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

DIETARY SHOWDOWN! PALEO VS. KETO VS. ATKINS! Hey there Fit Farmers! As you know, our approach to nutrition and eating here on the farm is all about real food for the real world. Most dieting scenarios end in disaster due to the inability to keep up the restrictive measure of calories or carbs or some other ingredient involved, which is why our approach differs from most most of the mainstream nutritional plans and lifestyles. But what if your specific body chemistry actually responds really well to a particular nutritional plan? Today we’re going to talk specifically about Keto, Atkins and Paleo. Often lumped together under the heading of “low carb fad diets”, these eating methodologies actually have very significant differences. Is one superior? Is one right for your body chemistry? Can they be used as short term “boost measures” to kickstart better health, rest and weight loss? In today’s post we’ll take a deeper dive into each of these diet types and see if we can come up with some answers, so hang on tight! THE PALEO DIET The name of this diet is taken from the Paleolithic period of human development, in which cavemen first began to use stone tools and sharpened points to hunt with, and also began to control and use fire. Regardless of your views on history and anthropology, the theme of the diet is to only eat what foods were available to these ‘Paleolithic peoples’ as they roamed about hunting and gathering — primarily meat, eggs, fish, and fresh fruits and vegetables. This is done in the belief that these are the food sources that humans are best adapted to rather than the agricultural products and processed foods that came much later in our evolutionary span. Critics point out that (if you buy into the historical basis here) human digestive a Continue reading >>

Blog: My Six Week Ketogenic Diet Experiment

Blog: My Six Week Ketogenic Diet Experiment

Disclaimer: The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Catalyst. This blog is not meant in any way as medical advice. Please consult a medical profession before commencing any new eating regime. What would you say if I told you there’s a diet where you can eat all the food you normally deny yourself, stop counting tedious calories, shift some weight, gain extra muscle and get an energy boost too? If you’re anything like me you’d be asking ‘where do I sign up?’! So when I heard about the ketogenic diet from a colleague I was immediately intrigued. This simply sounded too good to be true. Could I really eat fat and get lean? Enjoy peanut butter treats and squeeze into my skinny jeans? Never one to shy away from a challenge, I decided to see for myself, and so my six week experiment with the ketogenic diet began….. So what actually is a ketogenic, or ‘keto’, eating plan? In its most simple form, this is an extremely low-carb, high-fat diet. By lowering your carb intake your body is pushed into a metabolic state known as ketosis (key –tow –sis), where your body switches from burning carbs as its primary energy source to burning fat. To be more precise, it uses ketone bodies or ketones from the breakdown of fatty acids in the liver. Hence the name, ketosis. Now fatty fuel can come from a meal you’ve just eaten or from the stores of fat on your body (aka, the evil muffin top). While it may sound a little questionable, ketosis is actually an entirely natural metabolic process that the body initiates to help us survive when our food intake is low. Typically our body runs on glucose derived from the breakdown of carbs – this is because glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert and use as energy, so it will b Continue reading >>

Diet Wars - Carb Cycling Vs The Ketogenic Diet

Diet Wars - Carb Cycling Vs The Ketogenic Diet

Print After all these years, barely a week goes by in which I don’t get asked about ketogenic dieting or carb cycling (usually both). So to settle all debate, let’s look at the main benefits and drawbacks of each. Before we go into all that, let me just state that it’s a scientific fact that some people don’t have to worry as much about the types of carbs they eat, and don’t have to have severely low carb intakes to lose fat. This characteristic—insulin function/sensitivity—is highly genetically based . You can get tested for this and other genes via FitnessGenes (aka MuscleGenes), or you can pay careful attention and use long-term trial and error to determine your carb sensitivity. Let’s start with a carb-cycling diet first, which will enhance our discussion on keto later. First, a definition: Carb cycling could be anything from having two or three cheat/reward meals per week during a carb-restricted diet to having two or three very low carb days per week and eating a normal amount of carbs on other days. Carb cycling works best in people who are able to maintain a high degree of compliance, don’t succumb to cravings, and don’t have huge appetites. The reason for this is that it’s difficult to implement—you have to plan your meals fairly carefully. For most people, outside of hardcore gym-goers and competitors, this makes the compliance rate poor. The second problem is that some people, when they get that whiff of “cheat” food, can’t stop and go off on a bender, also throwing a monkey wrench into their attempts at compliance. If either of these is you, then stick to a consistent diet in which you adjust your carbs very gradually; or, if you do carb cycle, stick to foods that you know won’t push the “binge” button! For those who can p Continue reading >>

Atkins Vs Keto: Here's The Truth About Keto And Atkins

Atkins Vs Keto: Here's The Truth About Keto And Atkins

I'm going to be honest here. If you do a Google Trends search that compares the Keto Diet to Atkins, the Keto Diet is kicking Atkins' butt. In fact, the Atkins Diet itself has been losing traction over the past year and is sinking in interest, even without the competition between Atkins and Keto followers. Part of the reason is that Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. (the ANA) has been trying to improve the Old-School Atkins way of eating over the past few years by moving toward a more socially accepted low-glycemic diet, limiting the protein allowed on Atkins 20, and bringing in a higher-carb Atkins 40 to attract younger adults -- none of which works as well as the original, individualized low-carb diet does. With two out of every three Americans either overweight or obese today, reaching out to Millennials with mild insulin resistance isn't working as well as the ANA had hoped. The flesh-and-blood of the Atkins Diet are the baby boomers, but the ANA seems to have forgotten that. However, the popularity of the Keto Diet has only risen over the past year. More troublesome is that the number one result in Google search results for "Atkins vs Keto" is telling readers that the Atkins Diet fell out of popularity because: "people were getting sick, gaining weight over the long term, or increasing their blood lipid profile." Other claims included "heavy encouragement" to eat whatever you wanted whenever you wanted, as long as it was low in carbs, which has never been a part of the Atkins Diet. Supposedly, this low-carb free-for-all led to massive overeating, causing severe health problems, but in all of the decades that I have been involved in the low-carb movement, I have never seen that happen to anyone eating Atkins. The drop in popularity is more likely a result of the confusion t Continue reading >>

The Difference Between The Atkins And Ketogenic Diets

The Difference Between The Atkins And Ketogenic Diets

Low-carb diets are nothing new. Science has shown that eating too many carbohydrates, particularly simple and refined ones, is one of the leading causes of excessive weight gain.(1)(2) Two of the most popular low-carb diets today are the Atkins and ketogenic (keto) diets. Apart from being low in carbohydrates, these two regimens share many similarities, but they are not the same. Here’s a closer look at the Atkins and ketogenic diets. Atkins Diet Dr. Robert C. Atkins believed that the major reason that many people are overweight or obese is because of consuming processed carbohydrates, such as flour and sugar. As a result, he developed the Atkins diet, which is low in carbohydrates but high in protein and healthy fats.(5) This regimen aids weight loss because the restriction of carbohydrates forces the body to burn stored body fat instead of the glucose produced from carbohydrates. This effectively puts the body into a state of ketosis. The Atkins diet, however, did not gain widespread acceptance at first because many regarded the idea of consuming high amounts of saturated fats as unhealthy. Eventually, research has proven that saturated fats are harmless, and more than 20 studies over the past 12 years have shown the effectiveness of the Atkins diet.(3) The Four Phases Phase 1—Induction The most important stage of the Atkins diet is the induction phase, which lasts for two weeks. During this period, you need to keep your carbohydrate intake below 20 grams per day. Since the average person consumes 250 grams of carbs a day, the induction period is also the most challenging part of this program. At this stage, your food intake should come from allowed vegetables, meats, poultry, fish, and shellfish. You should also increase your water consumption.(4) As the inductio Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Deconstructed: Should You Follow It?

Ketogenic Diet Deconstructed: Should You Follow It?

Would you really want be to the hamster subjected to medical research and studies? If your answer is a vehement no, then maybe you should rethink trying those fad-diets that are, in reality, the outcome of some medical research carried out in order to combat a certain disease. Interestingly, the most popular diet regimes these days are dominantly low-carb in nature. I had previously talked about Atkins diet wherein your meals are literally devoid of carbohydrates and are mostly fats and primarily protein. Apparently, the diet was an aftermath of the American cardiologist Dr. Robert Atkins' desperate efforts to solve his own overweight condition. Another addition, rather a sequel to the Atkins' diet is the Ketogenic diet - let's take a deeper look into it. The Genesis Surprisingly, the Ketogenic diet had its genesis in epileptic seizures. Had it not been Dr. Henry Rawle Geyelin's research on ways to treat epileptic seizures, the diet would have probably never come into existence. Dr. Geyelin studied the considerable reduction in epileptic seizures and fits in his patients, when they underwent a fasting period. He then realized that low carb intake leading to plummeting blood glucose and increased fat metabolites, were key to managing seizures better. In addition to tackling the condition, the diet also led to weight loss - hence, the proposition of the diet. According to Dr. Ritika Sammadar, Nutritionist at Max Health Care in New Delhi, "We do follow the Ketogenic diet in hospitals with respect to those suffering from epilepsy. It helps remarkably in tackling seizures. However, in my opinion, it is absolutely impossible for non-patients to undertake the diet. Not only is it difficult to follow, it may also have severe health implications and repercussions." How does it w Continue reading >>

Ain’t That Nutritional Ketosis Thing Just Another Way Of Saying Atkins?

Ain’t That Nutritional Ketosis Thing Just Another Way Of Saying Atkins?

If I had a dollar for every time I heard some variation of the title of this column, I’d be a very rich man. Ever since I started on my n=1 nutritional ketosis experiment in May 2012 (read my four 30-day update posts: Day 1-30, Day 31-60, Day 61-90 and Day 91-120), I have seen interest that is near-unprecedented in my eight years of blogging about low carbohydrate diet and health. It just goes to show you that despite the best efforts by the media and all the so-called health “experts” trying to discredit healthy low carb living, countless numbers of people who want to lose weight and attain optimal health still believe in its amazing benefits. There’s certainly something there that warrants a closer look for those who have been struggling in their nutritional health goals. Being In A Ketogenic State If you’ve been following a low carb lifestyle for any length of time, you probably already understand the importance of being in a ketogenic state, where your body switches from using carbohydrates to fat — both dietary and stored body fat — and ketone bodies as its primary fuel sources. The late, great Dr. Robert C. Atkins made this key concept the centerpiece of his bestselling books. Unfortunately, dietary ketosis has been severely maligned by Dr. Atkins detractors as somehow being a “dangerous” state. “Ketosis” has a mistaken negative association with the truly dangerous and potentially fatal “diabetic ketoacidosis” that most frequently occurs in people with Type 1 diabetes. I encourage you to go listen to my podcast with Mark Sisson from the “Mark’s Daily Apple” blog in Episode 5 of “Ask The Low-Carb Experts” where we take on this misconception about ketosis. Another problem with using the term “ketosis” alone, as Dr. Atkins did Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets For Psychiatric Disorders: A New 2017 Review

Ketogenic Diets For Psychiatric Disorders: A New 2017 Review

If you have a brain, you need to know about ketogenic diets. The fact that these specially-formulated low-carbohydrate diets have the power to stop seizures in their tracks is concrete evidence that food has a tremendous impact on brain chemistry and should inspire curiosity about how they work. I first became interested in ketogenic diets as a potential treatment for bipolar mood disorders, given the many similarities between epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Ketogenic diets have been around for about 100 years, and have proved to be invaluable tools in the treatment of stubborn neurological conditions, most notably epilepsy. They have also shown promise in the management of other brain-based disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease, ALS, Traumatic Brain Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, and chronic headaches, as well as in metabolic disorders like obesity, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. But where does the science currently stand on the ketogenic diet and psychiatric disorders like bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s Disease? How many human studies do we have, and what do they tell us? If you are struggling with mood, attention, or memory problems, should you try a ketogenic diet? If you are a clinician, should you recommend a ketogenic diet to your patients? A recent review article “The Current Status of the Ketogenic Diet in Psychiatry” by researchers at the University of Tasmania in Australia [Bostock et al 2017 Front Psychiatry 20(8)] brings us nicely up to date on all things ketogenic and mental health. I summarize the paper below and offer some thoughts and suggestions of my own. [Full disclosure: I am a psychiatrist who studies nutrition and eats a ketogenic diet.] First, some basics for those of you who are unfamiliar with these special diets. Definition Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Comparing The Keto Diet Vs The Mediterranean Diet

Comparing The Keto Diet Vs The Mediterranean Diet

As research and nutrition advice evolves, the idea of the “perfect” diet is changing, too. Low-fat used to be all-the-rage until we started realizing it wasn’t sustainable (or palatable) for long-term weight loss or health. Now that we know fat is “in,” good and necessary, we’re faced with different recommendations within that realm. We’ve already compared two of the most popular diets these days: the ketogenic diet and the Paleo diet. In this article, we’ll be comparing the keto diet vs the Mediterranean diet, summarizing each and then seeing where they are similar as well as different. What is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic diet is a strictly modified form of the original Atkins diet, a low-carb and high-protein diet. Atkins first came on the scene in the 1980’s, and it was revolutionary in its advice to eat more fat and reduce carbs. The ketogenic diet, which focuses on very high fat (at least 70-80%), moderate protein (20-25%), and very low carb intake (5-10%), was originally designed to reduce seizures in children with epilepsy. Since then, it’s been discovered to be helpful for everything from weight loss to possible alternative cancer therapies. The idea behind the keto diet is to put the body into ketosis, a metabolic state where the body uses up all its carb stores and begins burning fat for energy instead. Ketosis has many health benefits and is also used as a preventative diet for chronic disease. Keto foods include: Fats including healthy oils, avocados, fatty nuts or nut butters, eggs, and full-fat dairy like butter or ghee Animal proteins including beef, poultry, organ meats, fatty fish, and eggs None or VERY limited amounts of fruits and only those that are low in sugar like berries NO sugars, flours, or processed foods as any extra carb Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

Obesity And Fitness Are Revolutionized By Reddit, Not Doctors

Obesity And Fitness Are Revolutionized By Reddit, Not Doctors

From reading the article I get the impression that the author isn't that familiar with the scientific literature at all. The evidence he presents against the usefulness of cardio for weight loss compares a group of weightlifters against a group of runners who ran only 20km per week and they still lost marginally more weight than the weightlifters! Cardio really should be a minimum of an hour per day, at least 5 days a week if weight control is the goal. Health benefits accrue much sooner, though. Science certainly hasn't weighed in on favor of high protein diets or abandoning cardio unless you cherry pick specific smaller studies to get what you're looking for. On the other hand there are HUGE studies supporting cardio, both for weight loss and for health. I've written about this many times before on HN: According to the 32,000 person study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (1999), "fit persons with any combination of smoking, elevated blood pressure, or elevated cholesterol level had lower adjusted death rates than low-fit persons with none of these characteristics". The same study found that aerobic fitness had a far more important impact on longevity than obesity did. Fantastic Voyage, Kurzweil and Grossman, Chapter 22. Here's a report on a study that monitored over 100,000 people: Paul Williams, Ph.D., author of the study, found that men who ran two or more marathons per year were 41 percent less likely to suffer from high blood pressure, 32 percent less likely to have high cholesterol, and 87 percent less likely to be diabetic than non-marathoners. Those who ran only one marathon every two to five years also had significantly lower risk for these conditions than non-marathoners. The benefits of running marathons were largely independent of total number Continue reading >>

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