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Take Your Training To The Next Level With Ketosis

Take Your Training To The Next Level With Ketosis

One of the most popular critiques of a ketogenic diet – a diet that’s high in fat and low in carbs – is that it isn’t good for athletes. The argument is usually that you need carbs to produce glycogen, a stored form of sugar that fuels your muscles. As a result, most doctors and trainers suggest high-carb diets for athletes. If you’ve been working out while eating Bulletproof, Paleo, keto, or any other variation on a high-fat, low-carb diet, here’s some good news: brand new research shows that you not only don’t need carbs for athletic performance, you can actually gain an advantage if you cut them out. Let’s talk about how ketosis can kick your athletic performance into a higher gear. Why you don’t need carbs to train hard A groundbreaking new study out of UConn found that low-carb endurance athletes perform just as well as high-carb endurance athletes, if not better. The results challenge nearly 50 years of research saying the opposite. Until now, most studies have concluded that you top out at around 10% of energy recruited from fat [1] and for the rest you rely mostly on glycogen, a form of sugar stored in your muscles and liver. That’s the main reason high-carb diets have been the standard for athletes for so many years. With a low-carb diet, your glycogen stores empty quickly, you run out of fuel, and you start breaking down your muscles for energy. Right? Well, maybe not. If you teach your body to prefer fat for fuel you can work out intensely without any problems, according to this new study. The paper’s authors measured the performance of ultra-endurance runners who regularly run upwards of 100 miles. Here’s how they set it up: Half of the participants ate low-carb (<20% of calories from carbs) for 6 months The other half ate high-carb ( Continue reading >>

Runketo.com

Runketo.com

- We are Running on Ketones. This is not a typical story; we are endurance athletes at different stages of our lives, who are experimenting with a low carb Ketogenic diet. We are not doctors or scientists, just athletes. Anthony is the youngest and the fastest, age 20, and prefers ultra road running. Eric (ZoomZoom), age 27, is ukulele playing mixed distance runner. Dan (SKA Runner), age 42, is new to running, prefers mountains ultras, and a bit of a computer geek. Bob(uglyrnrboy), age 54, prefers mountains ultras and loves to tele ski. This site, www.RunKeto.com, will document our journey as endurance athletes implementing a low carb ketogenic diet in to our lives. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you have about our experiences. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Ultra Running?

The Ketogenic Diet And Ultra Running?

About two weeks ago at my wife’s race, a “kid” came running up to me and asked me if was running Devil Mountain 50 this year – I was wearing the shirt. I told him that I was planning on running it, but did not register yet. He told me that his car wouldn’t make it and he needed a ride. Now this “kid'” who is barely 20, keep in mind I am 42 and everyone seems younger than me and usually the youngest ultra runner is in their thirties, was wired and full of energy and excitement – like Christmas day. Honestly, I did not want to go unless I had a ride or car-pooled myself. I met another guy, Bob, who was going and we all ended up driving together; it was the shortest 5 hour drive every. The conversation was generally all about diet, particularly the Ketogenic diet. The “kid”, Anthony Kunkel, also known as ‘G’ was following this diet and seemed very knowledgeable about it. Then again, I no nothing about nutrition or have never followed any type of diet plan, other than just ‘train hard’ and eat less. To get to my point, he describe this diet, which honestly I never heard of and it was quit interesting – Ketogenic. He eats 85-95% fat and 10% protein? What’s up with that? Bacon everyday, count me in. So he decided to take on his first 50 miler, his planned pace would have beaten the course record. My plans are never realistic and I have never met any of my goals, so I didn’t think much of it, plus he is a kid. Now you have to keep in mind that Bob and my goal was just to finish, but G was getting us pumped to run our best too. During the race, the front pack got lost and unfortunately, he was there too. For the record, that was the first time I was the leader of a race ever, and this was mile ten. I was psyched and I held it for a few miles. I Continue reading >>

How To Exercise On A Keto Diet

How To Exercise On A Keto Diet

Following several requests from my readers, I will be sharing my thoughts on exercise and nutrition that is specific to those of who stay physically active and follow a keto diet. In this post, I'll try to cover the basic facts and myths about training on a ketogenic diet. This post will not cover details of exercise nutrition (e.g. whether to eat carbs before or after exercise which is not as straightforward as you may think), essential supplements, specific types of training or my personal exercise routine. These topics are covered in this post: Keto Diet Nutrition & Exercise: Carbs - and many more will follow in my future posts. So let's start with some basics of training on a keto diet. The "Exercise More and Eat Less" Dogma When you ask people what is the purpose of exercise, the most common answers are: to lose weight (body fat) to get fit and stay healthy to look and feel good to build muscles and strength When your goal is fat loss, the most common mistake is to go on a calorie restricted diet and add more exercise, usually prolonged cardio, in an effort to lose weight. When this approach fails, most people simply decrease their calorie intake and take on even more exercise. By doing so, most become physically and mentally exhausted with no real weight loss. The more they stick to this approach, the more like they will overexercise and/ or overeat, putting an increasing amount of stress on their body. The side effects of that are accelerating the ageing process of their cells and increasing the level of chronic inflammation. This approach is simply not sustainable and can harm your body. Years before I started following a low-carb approach, I used to spend hours exercising every week. In fact, I used to go to gym almost every day for an hour or more, usually doi Continue reading >>

#04: Running A Keto Food Blog -- Tasteaholics

#04: Running A Keto Food Blog -- Tasteaholics

In our fourth episode we talk to Vicky and Rami, the creators of Tasteaholics.com. Their food blog showcases their popular "in five" e-book series, their app The Total Keto Diet and several keto based recipes and informational articles. In the interview they share some great tips on cooking on a keto diet and running a food blog. You can check out their Total Keto Diet App now available on Google Play and check out the newest addition to their "in five" series - Dessert in Five! We'll be back next week to answer some viewer questions! If you want your question answer DM us on Instagram! -- Music by Joakim Karud Music by @joakimkarudmusic Continue reading >>

The Runner’s Guide To The… Ketogenic Diet

The Runner’s Guide To The… Ketogenic Diet

There’s nothing more that runners like to talk about (other than running) than our nutrition and what we eat. Let’s face it, food is a pretty important part of our running and it can make all the difference in terms of performance too. But, different foods work for different people and there’s no hard and fast rules in the world of eating, other than to say do what’s best for you and seek out balance in your diet. To help you along the way, we’re presenting a series of articles that look at the different types of diet on offer to help you make your own informed decisions. There’s no preaching from the thrones here, just some basic information for you to consider. First up is the ketogenic diet… For those on the ketogenic diet… carbs are out, fat is in… switching starchy goodness for full-fat delights. But where can you get some? Ketones aren’t something you buy; they’re inside your body. To be more specific, ketones are a type of organic substance produced naturally by the liver when it breaks down fat for energy. Confused? Okay, let’s say you’re eating a standard, balanced diet. Your body gets most of its energy by turning carbs into glucose, which your cells then convert to energy. Glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert to energy, so it will always be chosen over any other energy source. However, on the ketogenic diet, you reduce carb intake typically to less than 50 grams a day. So rather than relying on carbs as its primary energy source, your body uses ketone bodies, which are derived from fat. This metabolic state is called ketosis. During ketosis, the liver produces ketone bodies, which are then converted into substances that feed your cell’s energy production. So, if you’re an ultra runner in the state of ketosis, t Continue reading >>

How I Fueled For Running 19 Miles On A High-fat Diet

How I Fueled For Running 19 Miles On A High-fat Diet

Most runners have been taught to load up on carbs before a run. What you eat before a run can greatly affect your performance—it’s simple science, right? After spending some time trying to understand the role food plays in running a marathon, I took on a high-fat ketogenic diet. And let me tell you, it was a doozy. I decided that I was going to change to the ketogenic diet and see how that helped me in my journey to lose weight. I knew my body didn’t do well when I ate a lot of carbs, so trying a high-fat diet seemed it may work better for me. Going ‘keto’ seemed perfect for what I was looking for. A lot of people hear the term “train gain” (when a runner gains weight while training), and I was the number one example of that. Whenever I would begin training for runs and adding more miles to my days, my body weight increased. A ketogenic diet, which comprises only eating 5 percent of carbs a day, seemed like the golden ticket. However, I knew it wasn’t going to be easy. The Begining Of My High-Fat Diet The first week on the diet was a nightmare. I was exhausted every day from the lack of carbs I was eating, and the cravings were unreal. I never knew I could crave pasta so heavily until I stopped eating carbs completely. My day would comprise waking up, going to work, and laying in bed if it wasn’t a run day. I was that tired. I was grumpy all the time, especially at the gym and before a run. My training included running twice a week for 30 minutes and increasing my miles on the weekend. My weekday runs were challenging. I put a lot of my energy into making sure I was on track with the diet. I pushed and kept telling myself I could do it, and the 30 minutes flew by. When it came time for my weekend run, I was drained. Between training for my challenge ru Continue reading >>

How To Become A Keto Runner

How To Become A Keto Runner

There has been a lot in the press recently about a ‘controversial’ book by running supremo Professor Tim Noakes called The Real Meal Revolution. He is responsible for the training bible The Lore of Running and is a very experienced runner. After years of training on a high carbohydrate diet – carb loading before races and using carbs as a source of energy/fuel he had become lethargic and no longer enjoyed running. He had also developed Type 2 diabetes. A shift in his thinking led to Tim adopting a Low Carb/High Fat approach called the Banting Diet and went from ‘running like a 60-year-old to running like a 40-year-old’. He was so inspired by it that he turned it into his Real Meal Revolution book. Years ago I used to run pretty much entirely fueled by carbs. For the first 20 minutes or so I would fly along and then slowly my energy would disappear (along with my sense of humour) and I would get progressively slower. When I was marathon training I needed to constantly pop jelly beans after an hour or so of running. My skin was bad, my digestive system was a mess and I began to resent how running made me feel. I no longer enjoyed it, it was a chore. NOW, in 2016 it is a completely different picture. When I run I sometimes have to stop myself….I feel like I could run forever…… I am not suggesting that a LCHF/Banting/Keto approach is for everyone, one size doesn’t fit all. BUT and it is a big BUT, if you try it and it works for you then it will change your life. If you are a new runner then now is the perfect time to start. If you are an experienced runner then you may have a bit of frustration becoming adapted to this new way of approaching fuel. Bear with it though and give it at least 6 weeks. Keto Runner – The Diet There is now plenty of Low Carb/Ket Continue reading >>

Fat For Fuel, My Ketogenic Diet Experiment While Endurance Training.

Fat For Fuel, My Ketogenic Diet Experiment While Endurance Training.

What is a ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, is a state known as ketosis. The ketosis we're talking about is what Dr. Atkins refers to as "Benign Dietary Ketosis" (or BDK), and should never be confused with Acidosis — a dangerous state for diabetics and those in advanced starvation where acetone builds in the blood and tissues. People will sometimes tell you that producing ketones is dangerous for the body. This is simply misinformation. They're confusing ketosis (the state from a ketogenic diet) with ketoacidosis (or acidosis) which occurs in uncontrolled diabetes and/or starvation. The ketogenic diet has been around for a long time. A quick google search will reveal that the ketogenic diet was introduced by modern physicians as a treatment for epilepsy in the 1920s. For two decades this therapy was widely used, but with the modern era of antiepileptic drug treatment its use declined dramatically. By the end of the twentieth century this therapy was available in only a small number of children's hospitals. Over the past 15 years, there has been an explosion in the use, and scientific interest in the "keto" diet. Remarkable studies are showing great promise by using the keto diet in the treatment of alzheimers, cancer, diabetes and obesi Continue reading >>

Ultrarunning And Fueling 'paleo'

Ultrarunning And Fueling 'paleo'

I completed the Whole30 Program in March 0f 2013. Basically it meant eating some good fats, a whole lot of vegetables of all kinds, meat/fish/poultry and a little fruit. It's delicious and satisfying, and I felt so incredible, I've continued to eat a Paleo diet. After years of relying on gels, blocks and sugary food and drinks to fuel my long runs, I had to start from square one and work through a lot of trial and error, detailed in this post. In seeking answers I discovered there were other ultrarunners who were eating similarly and talking about it. Below are some links I hope you'll find helpful. Heck, even Olympic gold medal triathletes and professional cyclists are jumping on the bandwagon. Sonja Wieck, Ironman triathlete and Kona qualifier - eats Paleo, but uses non-Paleo fuel Here are a few posts from others who have experimented with Very Low Carb or Ketogenic fueling: Jonathan Fales found that you can only go so far and so fast Peter Attia's excellent in-depth post My Experiences: Posts About Running on Paleo/Whole30 Do you eat Paleo, low carb, or simply eschew sugar and processed foods? I'd love to hear about your experiences! Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Books About Keto?

What Are The Best Books About Keto?

If you are like many who have been in pursuit of weight-loss and overall better health, you have probably been through, or at least read about, tons of different books and diet plans. The constant switching and searching can become disheartening, especially if you haven’t found something that works right for your body and lifestyle. If you are still searching for that good plan, there is a diet that has been around a long time but is only recently emerging from the shadows and gaining widespread attention: the Ketogenic Diet. The ketogenic diet was developed nearly a hundred years ago as a means to help treat people who have epilepsy, but it has long been known to promote weight loss as well. Now, it is reemerging as a diet that is beneficial for weight loss and management, as well as for helping treat other medical concerns. As with many diet plans, though, there are numerous approaches and lots of books and information out there about it that might be confusing to newbies. Lucky for you, we are here to guide you through it. So, to help you learn the best quality information about the lifestyle, we are going to share with you our top 5 books on the keto way of life so that you can get started on your own journey to weight loss and healthy living. Our Top 5 Ketogenic Books this 2018 1. Keto Clarity: Your Definitive Guide to the Benefits of a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet Continue reading >>

Running Without Carbs – A Week Trialling A Ketogenic Diet

Running Without Carbs – A Week Trialling A Ketogenic Diet

After spending some a lot of time trying to understand the role food plays in running a marathon, this post is about my attempt train for a week whilst on a ketogenic (super low carbohydrate) diet. For an explanation of what ‘ketogenic’ actually means & why I’d do this to myself it’s worth checking out my previous post “Nutrition for a marathon – what should you eat?”, but here’s a summary of the most relevant part: During moderate to high intensity exercise, carbohydrate is the body’s preferred fuel source. There’s a limit to how many calories worth of carbohydrates you can store, and so for endurance events like the marathon it can be difficult to take on enough in order to avoid running out. The other main energy source – fats – are almost inexhaustible, so making your body more efficient at using them during exercise may help delay the point at which fatigue sets in. This theory was enough to make me curious about the application and effects of low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diets. Could an approach almost completely opposite to the ‘carbo-loading’ norm actually help you run further, faster? Fatty fatty run run! The assumption behind following a carbohydrate restricted diet is that it helps the body become more effective at utilising fat as a fuel source. In short, eating yourself to metabolic flexibility. Whether this actually translates to improved endurance ability is another debate, but for now let’s just say there isn’t conclusive proof it doesn’t work, so I thought it was worth a closer look. To be clear from the outset, here’s what the week wasn’t about… I didn’t take any baseline data. I didn’t measure any effects (other than how I felt during the week). 7 days isn’t long enough to become properly fat adapted. Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: Happy Muscles Running On Fat

The Keto Diet: Happy Muscles Running On Fat

Over the last few weeks of my pretty active life — biking to and from work, hiking hills with friends, kayaking, paddle boarding, competing in dragonboat races, and even just working out at my local gym — I’ve noticed something exciting: my muscles feel just great. In fact, at age 59, my muscles feel and perform better now, in every sphere of my life, than they ever did when I was 20, 30 or 40. They are stronger. They don’t hurt as much when I am working out; they don’t fatigue as easily or complain under strain as much. And after a hard workout, they don’t feel as sore as they used to the next day. I can come to only one conclusion: My muscles run so much better on fat than they ever did on glucose. The difference really struck me this last month, after slipping off my ketogenic diet while at the family cottage. I’ve been solidly in ketosis for almost two years now, ever since a pre-diabetes scare in the fall of 2015 converted me to the low-carb keto diet. In the post I wrote about that cottage slip, I joked that one impact of falling off the keto wagon was that my reaction time and performance in our cottage spike ball tournaments significantly declined. But it wasn’t really a joke. My performance did decline. I’m proud to say when I first arrived at the cottage I was a keto-adapted fat burner and I won the first highly competitive spike ball tournament with my niece’s partner. “Aunt Anne you rock!” the young nieces and nephews (all of whom I beat) had high-fived me. By the end of the week, same partner but now eating a high-carb diet, I performed dismally – slow and sluggish. Where we were unbeatable a mere five days earlier, we were unwinnable now. And it was all me. That poorer physical performance while still out of ketosis really hit me Continue reading >>

24 Benefits Of The Ketogenic Diet

24 Benefits Of The Ketogenic Diet

You may have heard the term ‘ketosis’, ‘keto’ or ‘ketogenic diet’ thrown about in various health, weight-loss and sports performance blogs. The ‘keto diet’ is growing in popularity – especially in the circles I just mentioned. If you haven’t heard of these terms, or you’re still confused as to what exactly ‘ketosis’ is then have a listen to this podcast - -and make sure you tune in to the online keto summit that is happening right now at www.ketosummit.com Otherwise in a nutshell ketosis can be defined as a “metabolic state that happens when you consume a very low carb, moderate protein, high fat diet (or fast for extended periods) that causes your body to switch from using glucose as it’s primary source of fuel, to running off ketones. Ketones themselves are produced when the body burns fat, and they’re primarily used as an alternative fuel source when glucose isn’t available.” (Keto Clarity) In other words, you switch from being a sugar burner to being a fat burner. But I should point out that simply going on a low carb diet is often not enough to reach nutritional ketosis. Why would one want to do this? Well there are a lot of reasons, and I’m going to share 24 of them below. Note: If you already understand all the benefits of ketosis and want to delve into the nitty gritty of the how, why and what be sure to check out my article 'Everything You Ought To Know About Ketosis' and be sure to download my FREE one page Ketosis Cheat Sheet guide by clicking HERE. 1. Weight Loss Low carb, high fat diets have been used for centuries by doctors when working with obese patients. William Banting published the widely popular booklet titled ‘Letter on Corpulence Addressed to the Public’ in 1863. In this booklet he explained how he had sli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Experiment

Ketogenic Experiment

I used the Ketogenic Diet for 7 months, running an average of 85 miles/week, peaking at 200 miles/week, including over 50 marathon length runs. I was surprised how little impact the Ketogenic Diet had on my running, and I could maintain my training regime without difficulty. However I was not able to race successfully on the Ketogenic Diet and I found the Ketogenic Diet difficult to comply with. This write up should not be considered as scientific in any way; it is simply my anecdotal experience. As an ultrarunner, I've experimented with Low Carbohydrate Diets (LCD) before with little success. I found that running on LCD let me feeling like I was permanently Glycogen depleted. However, after reading The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance and Ketogenic Diets: Treatments for Epilepsy and Other Disorders I decided to experiment with a true Ketogenic Diet which is quite different from most general Low Carb Diets. I was on the Ketogenic Diet from March to November of 2013 (~7 months). For some of the time I was on the Ketogenic Diet I analyzed my food in detail. During this time my average diet was 3,740 Calories/day, 357g fat, 53g carbs, 27g fiber (26g Net Carbohydrates), and 88g protein. This is a Ketogenic Ratio of 3.13:1, and the calories ware 87.6% fat, 2.8% carbohydrate, 9.6% protein. I found the ketogenic diet remarkably hard work and tiresome. The food choices were grim, and it was not really possible to eat anything even vaguely like a normal diet. Even bacon was too low in fat to be eaten freely. I found my body fat dropped to its lowest level ever. However, I'm not sure how much of that is the Ketogenic Diet directly and how much is because I was analyzing everything I was eating, so I was far more aware of any excess calorie intake. Another possibili Continue reading >>

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