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Keto Running Blog

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

OK, here’s the deal – I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: an extremely high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is not for everyone. But since ketones are a preferred fuel for the heart and the diaphragm, and because a state of ketosis can give you extreme focus and cognitive performance during difficult mental tasks, a ketogenic diet can be extremely useful for endurance athletes like triathletes, distance swimmers, cyclists, marathoners, ultra-runners, etc. Problem is, there aren’t a ton of resources out there about how highly active people can actually get into a state of ketosis without… A) chugging coconut oil and MCT oil all day long, which (trust me, I’ve tried) gets boring really, really fast; or B) experiencing some pretty extreme nutrient deficiencies from a ketogenic diet gone wrong – nutrient deficiencies that really get magnified when you combine them with crazy high levels of physical activity. So in this article, author, triathlete, and ketogenic expert extraordinaire Patricia Daly is going to fill you in on how to do things the right way. Patricia just finished writing an amazing book called “Practical Keto Meal Plans For Endurance Athletes: Tips, Tricks And How To’s For Optimizing Performance Using A High Fat, Low Carb Meal Plan“, and she’s a wealth of information on this topic. Take it away, Patricia. ————————————– Maybe the title of this article scares you a little bit… …after all, if there’s so much that can “go wrong” with the ketogenic and low carb lifestyle, is it worth all the effort? Or do you think you will never “get there” and achieve nutritional ketosis because there seem to so many stumbling blocks in your way, like talk about thyroid damage, lack of energy or extreme dietary Continue reading >>

#04: Running A Keto Food Blog -- Tasteaholics

#04: Running A Keto Food Blog -- Tasteaholics

In our fourth episode we talk to Vicky and Rami, the creators of Tasteaholics.com. Their food blog showcases their popular "in five" e-book series, their app The Total Keto Diet and several keto based recipes and informational articles. In the interview they share some great tips on cooking on a keto diet and running a food blog. You can check out their Total Keto Diet App now available on Google Play and check out the newest addition to their "in five" series - Dessert in Five! We'll be back next week to answer some viewer questions! If you want your question answer DM us on Instagram! -- Music by Joakim Karud Music by @joakimkarudmusic Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis (or: Why I Don't Eat Any Carbs. Ever.)

Nutritional Ketosis (or: Why I Don't Eat Any Carbs. Ever.)

So a few months ago I had a long talk with Mike Morton who is an elite ultrarunner and we chatted about a bunch of things but one stood out, nutritional ketosis. You can google it, but here is the short loosy-goosy scientific explanation. When you eat sugar/carbohydrates, your body converts this into stored energy in the form of glycogen in your muscles. This form of fuel is what you need to sprint, run up a flight of stairs or throw a baseball. Generally, you can only store enough glycogen in your muscles for about 3-4 hours of heavy use (running) which is A. why people carbo-load before marathons and B. why people 'bonk' at mile 20 of a marathon. 'Bonking' is what happens when your body runs out of glycogen and your brain (needing that energy) no longer has it. You go fuzzy and get really tired. Your body has run out of the primary fuel source it is used to using (sugar/carbs) and then goes into starvation mode, burning fats. Now, you can only store 3-4 hours of fuel in the form of glycogen in your muscles, but there is literally DAYS worth of fat energy stored in, well, your body fat. Your body has that (literally) for times of starvation. Most people know you can go a few weeks without eating any food (but you need water for the conversion) no problem. generally, in modern society we never have to tap this storage because there is plenty of food to go around. 20,000 ago people were not eating 3 square meals a day. Nor were they eating processed food, but I digress. So this 3-4 hour issue is a big deal for ultra runners like myself. When you are running for 18, 24, 30 hours at a shot you obviously have to be continually jamming carbs down your gullet to get enough calories (because your body has that pesky glycogen as a primary fuel source) which is not an easy feat. Continue reading >>

Interview With Biohacker And Keto Ultrarunner: Anthony Kunkel

Interview With Biohacker And Keto Ultrarunner: Anthony Kunkel

Anthony Kunkel is a rare bread of biohacker. He has figured out how to be unbelievably strong and fast while maintaining a ton of endurance. Kunkel hails from Colorado where he is a student and competitive runner with multiple sponsors. Anthony shares with us some of his hard earned wisdom on what got him to this place of maximum performance. Apparently he owns no shirts. You are a student living in Durango, CO. What are you studying? What is your plan? I’m studying Exercise Science with a coaching minor, focusing on the clinical side –with the undergraduate research here at Fort Lewis, it’s impossible to miss out on the actual research side of learning. So getting to both put people on treadmills to test ideas in the lab, then also gathering wisdom from experienced coaches, is perfect for me right now. Coaching runners has been the dream since I was barely a teenager. So after a decade of learning about this, I like to think I’m ready to really start coaching people at the top level. I have two clients for 2017 that are looking to nab an OTQ (Olympic Trials Qualifier) in the marathon, so this will be a great year for proving that all the information hasn’t been wasted on me! Longer term, I can’t imagine doing anything else. I want to coach and learn and improve as a coach until I’m gone. You recently came in second place at the prestigious and uber fast JFK 50 mile race. What did it take to do that? JFK has been a very stirring thing for me. I’m already scheduled to go back in 2017. I was stale, had a few issues that didn’t feel amazing on race day, and wasn’t really feeling too excited about the race going into it. But the day before, I decided -really decided in my heart- that these “details don’t matter.” I was going to race as well as I co Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Affects Running Performance

How The Ketogenic Diet Affects Running Performance

Ketogenic diets are on the rise among runners who hope to lose weight or teach their bodies to use fat as fuel. But a new study in Nutrition & Metabolism suggests that following a ketogenic diet may actually hinder your athletic performance. So what’s the truth about this diet and why does it have so much hype? Related: The Beginner’s Guide to the Ketogenic Diet What is a ketogenic diet? For decades, scientists and nutritionists have promoted carbohydrates as the main fuel source for exercise. We know that high carbohydrate diets increase the amount of glycogen stored in the liver and muscle, which improves endurance performance. Yet many athletes and scientists have recognized that the body is full of fat stores, and they wonder if we can tap into those stores for fuel. The major drawback is that it takes longer and requires more energy to utilize fat instead of stored carbohydrates. Still, many scientists are exploring this possibility by feeding athletes a high fat and low carbohydrate diet to observe changes in metabolism and performance. Recreational athletes are now trying this technique in the hope of burning fat and losing weight. The amount of fat one eats on a ketogenic diet varies, but the range is typically 75 percent fat, 20 percent protein and 5 percent carbs. To put that into perspective, a woman eating 1,800 calories a day would eat 150 grams of fat, 90 grams of protein and 22 grams of carbs. That’s a drastic shift from the typical carb-heavy runners diet. What does the research say? A recent study looked at the effects of the ketogenic diet on physical fitness, body composition and fat metabolism in healthy adults. Forty-two healthy people with an average age of 37 followed a ketogenic diet for six weeks. Seventy-two percent of their calories came Continue reading >>

24 Benefits Of The Ketogenic Diet

24 Benefits Of The Ketogenic Diet

You may have heard the term ‘ketosis’, ‘keto’ or ‘ketogenic diet’ thrown about in various health, weight-loss and sports performance blogs. The ‘keto diet’ is growing in popularity – especially in the circles I just mentioned. If you haven’t heard of these terms, or you’re still confused as to what exactly ‘ketosis’ is then have a listen to this podcast - -and make sure you tune in to the online keto summit that is happening right now at www.ketosummit.com Otherwise in a nutshell ketosis can be defined as a “metabolic state that happens when you consume a very low carb, moderate protein, high fat diet (or fast for extended periods) that causes your body to switch from using glucose as it’s primary source of fuel, to running off ketones. Ketones themselves are produced when the body burns fat, and they’re primarily used as an alternative fuel source when glucose isn’t available.” (Keto Clarity) In other words, you switch from being a sugar burner to being a fat burner. But I should point out that simply going on a low carb diet is often not enough to reach nutritional ketosis. Why would one want to do this? Well there are a lot of reasons, and I’m going to share 24 of them below. Note: If you already understand all the benefits of ketosis and want to delve into the nitty gritty of the how, why and what be sure to check out my article 'Everything You Ought To Know About Ketosis' and be sure to download my FREE one page Ketosis Cheat Sheet guide by clicking HERE. 1. Weight Loss Low carb, high fat diets have been used for centuries by doctors when working with obese patients. William Banting published the widely popular booklet titled ‘Letter on Corpulence Addressed to the Public’ in 1863. In this booklet he explained how he had sli Continue reading >>

Runketo.com

Runketo.com

- We are Running on Ketones. This is not a typical story; we are endurance athletes at different stages of our lives, who are experimenting with a low carb Ketogenic diet. We are not doctors or scientists, just athletes. Anthony is the youngest and the fastest, age 20, and prefers ultra road running. Eric (ZoomZoom), age 27, is ukulele playing mixed distance runner. Dan (SKA Runner), age 42, is new to running, prefers mountains ultras, and a bit of a computer geek. Bob(uglyrnrboy), age 54, prefers mountains ultras and loves to tele ski. This site, www.RunKeto.com, will document our journey as endurance athletes implementing a low carb ketogenic diet in to our lives. Please feel free to contact us with any questions you have about our experiences. Continue reading >>

Take Your Training To The Next Level With Ketosis

Take Your Training To The Next Level With Ketosis

One of the most popular critiques of a ketogenic diet – a diet that’s high in fat and low in carbs – is that it isn’t good for athletes. The argument is usually that you need carbs to produce glycogen, a stored form of sugar that fuels your muscles. As a result, most doctors and trainers suggest high-carb diets for athletes. If you’ve been working out while eating Bulletproof, Paleo, keto, or any other variation on a high-fat, low-carb diet, here’s some good news: brand new research shows that you not only don’t need carbs for athletic performance, you can actually gain an advantage if you cut them out. Let’s talk about how ketosis can kick your athletic performance into a higher gear. Why you don’t need carbs to train hard A groundbreaking new study out of UConn found that low-carb endurance athletes perform just as well as high-carb endurance athletes, if not better. The results challenge nearly 50 years of research saying the opposite. Until now, most studies have concluded that you top out at around 10% of energy recruited from fat [1] and for the rest you rely mostly on glycogen, a form of sugar stored in your muscles and liver. That’s the main reason high-carb diets have been the standard for athletes for so many years. With a low-carb diet, your glycogen stores empty quickly, you run out of fuel, and you start breaking down your muscles for energy. Right? Well, maybe not. If you teach your body to prefer fat for fuel you can work out intensely without any problems, according to this new study. The paper’s authors measured the performance of ultra-endurance runners who regularly run upwards of 100 miles. Here’s how they set it up: Half of the participants ate low-carb (<20% of calories from carbs) for 6 months The other half ate high-carb ( Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Experiment

Ketogenic Experiment

I used the Ketogenic Diet for 7 months, running an average of 85 miles/week, peaking at 200 miles/week, including over 50 marathon length runs. I was surprised how little impact the Ketogenic Diet had on my running, and I could maintain my training regime without difficulty. However I was not able to race successfully on the Ketogenic Diet and I found the Ketogenic Diet difficult to comply with. This write up should not be considered as scientific in any way; it is simply my anecdotal experience. As an ultrarunner, I've experimented with Low Carbohydrate Diets (LCD) before with little success. I found that running on LCD let me feeling like I was permanently Glycogen depleted. However, after reading The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance and Ketogenic Diets: Treatments for Epilepsy and Other Disorders I decided to experiment with a true Ketogenic Diet which is quite different from most general Low Carb Diets. I was on the Ketogenic Diet from March to November of 2013 (~7 months). For some of the time I was on the Ketogenic Diet I analyzed my food in detail. During this time my average diet was 3,740 Calories/day, 357g fat, 53g carbs, 27g fiber (26g Net Carbohydrates), and 88g protein. This is a Ketogenic Ratio of 3.13:1, and the calories ware 87.6% fat, 2.8% carbohydrate, 9.6% protein. I found the ketogenic diet remarkably hard work and tiresome. The food choices were grim, and it was not really possible to eat anything even vaguely like a normal diet. Even bacon was too low in fat to be eaten freely. I found my body fat dropped to its lowest level ever. However, I'm not sure how much of that is the Ketogenic Diet directly and how much is because I was analyzing everything I was eating, so I was far more aware of any excess calorie intake. Another possibili Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

Running Without Carbs – A Week Trialling A Ketogenic Diet

Running Without Carbs – A Week Trialling A Ketogenic Diet

After spending some a lot of time trying to understand the role food plays in running a marathon, this post is about my attempt train for a week whilst on a ketogenic (super low carbohydrate) diet. For an explanation of what ‘ketogenic’ actually means & why I’d do this to myself it’s worth checking out my previous post “Nutrition for a marathon – what should you eat?”, but here’s a summary of the most relevant part: During moderate to high intensity exercise, carbohydrate is the body’s preferred fuel source. There’s a limit to how many calories worth of carbohydrates you can store, and so for endurance events like the marathon it can be difficult to take on enough in order to avoid running out. The other main energy source – fats – are almost inexhaustible, so making your body more efficient at using them during exercise may help delay the point at which fatigue sets in. This theory was enough to make me curious about the application and effects of low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diets. Could an approach almost completely opposite to the ‘carbo-loading’ norm actually help you run further, faster? Fatty fatty run run! The assumption behind following a carbohydrate restricted diet is that it helps the body become more effective at utilising fat as a fuel source. In short, eating yourself to metabolic flexibility. Whether this actually translates to improved endurance ability is another debate, but for now let’s just say there isn’t conclusive proof it doesn’t work, so I thought it was worth a closer look. To be clear from the outset, here’s what the week wasn’t about… I didn’t take any baseline data. I didn’t measure any effects (other than how I felt during the week). 7 days isn’t long enough to become properly fat adapted. Continue reading >>

Ultrarunning And Fueling 'paleo'

Ultrarunning And Fueling 'paleo'

I completed the Whole30 Program in March 0f 2013. Basically it meant eating some good fats, a whole lot of vegetables of all kinds, meat/fish/poultry and a little fruit. It's delicious and satisfying, and I felt so incredible, I've continued to eat a Paleo diet. After years of relying on gels, blocks and sugary food and drinks to fuel my long runs, I had to start from square one and work through a lot of trial and error, detailed in this post. In seeking answers I discovered there were other ultrarunners who were eating similarly and talking about it. Below are some links I hope you'll find helpful. Heck, even Olympic gold medal triathletes and professional cyclists are jumping on the bandwagon. Sonja Wieck, Ironman triathlete and Kona qualifier - eats Paleo, but uses non-Paleo fuel Here are a few posts from others who have experimented with Very Low Carb or Ketogenic fueling: Jonathan Fales found that you can only go so far and so fast Peter Attia's excellent in-depth post My Experiences: Posts About Running on Paleo/Whole30 Do you eat Paleo, low carb, or simply eschew sugar and processed foods? I'd love to hear about your experiences! Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: Happy Muscles Running On Fat

The Keto Diet: Happy Muscles Running On Fat

Over the last few weeks of my pretty active life — biking to and from work, hiking hills with friends, kayaking, paddle boarding, competing in dragonboat races, and even just working out at my local gym — I’ve noticed something exciting: my muscles feel just great. In fact, at age 59, my muscles feel and perform better now, in every sphere of my life, than they ever did when I was 20, 30 or 40. They are stronger. They don’t hurt as much when I am working out; they don’t fatigue as easily or complain under strain as much. And after a hard workout, they don’t feel as sore as they used to the next day. I can come to only one conclusion: My muscles run so much better on fat than they ever did on glucose. The difference really struck me this last month, after slipping off my ketogenic diet while at the family cottage. I’ve been solidly in ketosis for almost two years now, ever since a pre-diabetes scare in the fall of 2015 converted me to the low-carb keto diet. In the post I wrote about that cottage slip, I joked that one impact of falling off the keto wagon was that my reaction time and performance in our cottage spike ball tournaments significantly declined. But it wasn’t really a joke. My performance did decline. I’m proud to say when I first arrived at the cottage I was a keto-adapted fat burner and I won the first highly competitive spike ball tournament with my niece’s partner. “Aunt Anne you rock!” the young nieces and nephews (all of whom I beat) had high-fived me. By the end of the week, same partner but now eating a high-carb diet, I performed dismally – slow and sluggish. Where we were unbeatable a mere five days earlier, we were unwinnable now. And it was all me. That poorer physical performance while still out of ketosis really hit me Continue reading >>

The Ironman Guide To Ketosis

The Ironman Guide To Ketosis

Written by Megan Roberts, MSc, and Tommy Wood MD, PhD What if there was a way to: Restore the boundless energy of your youth Improve your body composition and mood Eliminate the gas and bloating that plagues your every race Fuel your races without Gatorade and sugary gels AND regularly indulge in bacon, eggs, and butter??? Sounds too good to be true, right? Well, the truth is that all of the above (and more) is achievable by embracing some diet and lifestyle changes. The crux of the secret - the ketogenic diet. Perhaps you’ve heard of the ketogenic diet being touted for its weight loss efficacy. Or maybe you’ve heard it mentioned on Internet forums as the cure-all for everything from migraines to Alzheimer's to the pain in your little toe. But you? You’re an IRONMAN triathlete! You NEED carbohydrates to fuel your races, right??? Unfortunately, following that conventional sports nutrition advice has brought many desperate athletes to their knees, searching for an alternative when their health and training begin to suffer despite eating all those healthy whole grains. This is the first in a series of articles that will introduce you to the ketogenic diet, specifically for the IRONMAN athlete. At the end of this article, you will have the basics to decide whether or not a ketogenic diet might be right for you. What is ketosis? Before answering the big question of how to get into ketosis, let’s define what ketosis actually is. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which you’re predominantly burning fat for fuel. Note that this is not the same as diabetic ketoacidosis, which is characterized by high levels of both ketones and sugar in the blood, particularly in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this case we’re talking about nutritional ketosis, which is a natural metab Continue reading >>

The Runner’s Guide To The… Ketogenic Diet

The Runner’s Guide To The… Ketogenic Diet

There’s nothing more that runners like to talk about (other than running) than our nutrition and what we eat. Let’s face it, food is a pretty important part of our running and it can make all the difference in terms of performance too. But, different foods work for different people and there’s no hard and fast rules in the world of eating, other than to say do what’s best for you and seek out balance in your diet. To help you along the way, we’re presenting a series of articles that look at the different types of diet on offer to help you make your own informed decisions. There’s no preaching from the thrones here, just some basic information for you to consider. First up is the ketogenic diet… For those on the ketogenic diet… carbs are out, fat is in… switching starchy goodness for full-fat delights. But where can you get some? Ketones aren’t something you buy; they’re inside your body. To be more specific, ketones are a type of organic substance produced naturally by the liver when it breaks down fat for energy. Confused? Okay, let’s say you’re eating a standard, balanced diet. Your body gets most of its energy by turning carbs into glucose, which your cells then convert to energy. Glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert to energy, so it will always be chosen over any other energy source. However, on the ketogenic diet, you reduce carb intake typically to less than 50 grams a day. So rather than relying on carbs as its primary energy source, your body uses ketone bodies, which are derived from fat. This metabolic state is called ketosis. During ketosis, the liver produces ketone bodies, which are then converted into substances that feed your cell’s energy production. So, if you’re an ultra runner in the state of ketosis, t Continue reading >>

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