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Keto Ruined My Health

How The Super Healthy, Low Carb/sugar Paleo Diet Ruined Our Health & Sanity

How The Super Healthy, Low Carb/sugar Paleo Diet Ruined Our Health & Sanity

If you are doing awesome on it, great! Peeps if you are following paleo, LCHF, primal or some other way of eating and it’s working for you and you feel amazing, that is super fantastic, I’m honestly very happy for you. This post isn’t for you.. or maybe it is so you know what to watch out for, I simply implore you to listen to and love your body and change shit up if you need to. If all is going well, fantastic!! Much health and happiness to you. This is my story and my partners so you don’t have to relate to it in any way, shape or form if you’re going to be a nasty about it, please keep it to yourself. I’m 3 days overdue pregnant and I don’t give a fuck about your precious ego or how I didn’t do it right or how you have the answers and are better than everyone. Seriously. Read with an open mind or go along on your merry way. Pre Paleo When I met Dan he was fit, robust and literally NEVER, EVER got sick. We enjoyed watching tv series (Game of Thrones, True Blood, The Walking Dead) together whilst eating mix bag lollies and we LOVED to eat out. We didn’t worry about what we ate. Dan subsisted on mainly cereal, subway, Boost smoothies, omelettes and some vegetables and meat now and then; I remember he would eat like four bowls of cereal in the morning- so a pretty high carb diet, our favourite cuisine was Japanese, especially the sticky rice and the green tea ice cream for dessert. Getting sick- start of diet obsessions I had battled candida in the past but when I met him I was doing pretty well as I had been on a long course of daily Diflucan and that seemed to sort that out for a while, unfortunately it appeared to really mess with my immune system and I began getting vomiting bugs all the time and contracted some nasty viruses such as Eppstein Barr a Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Burn Fat With A Cyclical Ketogenic Diet

Burn Fat With A Cyclical Ketogenic Diet

The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet What is a cyclical ketogenic diet and how does it help one burn fat? By the way, what even constitutes an optimal physique? This is different based on each individual’s unique genetic potential but researchers would agree that we should have a moderate to thin structure and good muscular development. While many have sought after a thin physique, the mantra of the 21st century is that strong is the new thin! We want to have a good body fat percentage (6-15% for men and 15-30% for women) and have developed well-toned musculature. This article discusses how to build muscle and burn fat with a cyclical ketogenic diet Ketogenic Diet and Fat Metabolism: A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the bodies metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). The ketogenic diet is built around good fats such as grass-fed butter, coconut products, avocados, nuts/seeds, pasture-raised animal products and extra-virgin olive oil. This diet should also focus on low-carbohydrate fruits, vegetables and herbs as staple components. The fat levels will be between 60-80% of calorie intake. How Ketones Are Formed? The body has two major energy sources, it burns glucose or ketone bodies. The majority of people burn glucose primarily because they are constantly supplying a steady form of sugar, starches and proteins that can be turned into blood sugar. When one either fasts or goes on a low-carb, moderate protein and high fat diet they switch their energy source to fat. In particular, the fatty acids are broken down into keto Continue reading >>

Let's Settle This: Is The Keto Diet Ruining The Environment?

Let's Settle This: Is The Keto Diet Ruining The Environment?

Sabina King Recently, a lot of people have been jumping on the Keto bandwagon, myself included. For those of you who aren't familiar, the ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carb eating plan designed to help your body reach a state of ketosis, in which it burns fat as opposed to sugar. After just seven days in, I could see what all the hype was about: I had more energy, more focus, and a steadier appetite. But with the knowledge that eating less meat is a way to reduce climate change, I couldn’t help but wonder about the environmental impacts of my new, meat- and dairy-heavy diet. Was what’s good for me actually bad for the planet? After consulting the research, I found that unless your alternative is going vegan, adopting a keto diet really isn't any more harmful than being on an omnivore human diet. In fact, it can be even better. The objective of a ketogenic diet is to help the body use fuel more efficiently. Think about it this way: When your car gets better gas mileage, it winds up using less gas. The same is true about our bodies. On the keto diet, we get more mileage out of the food we consume, and therefore we're bound to eat less. If we are able to knock out those unnecessary carbs, we can lower our personal carbon footprint. For those of you wondering, yes, it is possible to get the benefits of a keto diet while doing the Earth a solid and forgoing animal products altogether. However, it isn't necessarily easy. In order to bring you enough fat, your vegan keto diet will need to rely heavily on foods like avocados, nuts (macadamia nuts and walnuts in particular), flax products, and oils. For those of us who want to make our keto diets more sustainable without giving up meat altogether, here are a few ways I'm doing so: In order to keep dairy milk in your diet Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs Keto: Why Ketosis Is Different From A Low Carb Diet

Low Carb Vs Keto: Why Ketosis Is Different From A Low Carb Diet

Are you making a critical mistake when it comes to ketosis? I’ve been extremely guilty of it in the past. One of the biggest mistakes for people trying to improve their health is the misconception that a low carbohydrate diet equals a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case and could be killing your efforts to get all of the health benefits you are looking for. There are some critical differences in what people think a “low-carb high-fat” (LCHF) diet is and what a ketogenic diet is. High carb doesn’t mean diabetic. Just like low carb doesn’t mean ketogenic. If you’re not super down with what ketosis is, it is simply a metabolic state of using fats for energy. This provides a lot of benefits that we can get into later, but long story short, there are numerous benefits that you’re going to be missing out on if you are simply “low-carb” and not definitively in ketosis. Your low carb diet can actually be pretty brutal if it is not a ketogenic diet. As evidence, this is a maddening conversation that bubbles up more and more as I won’t shut up about ketogenic diets: Person: “Yeah, I tried ketosis and it sucked, I felt awful. Doesn’t work for me.” Me: “Hmm, that’s weird, did you check your ketone levels?” Person: “No. But, I was low carb. Ketosis isn’t for me. It sucks.” Me: “Well… low carb doesn’t mean you’re burning fats and utilizing ketones, so your body was still probably trying to use carbs as fuel, but you didn’t have enough around eating low carb, which is why it sucked.” Person: “I’m not tracking. Ketosis sucks. And so do you.” This person was low-carb, not keto. There is a huge difference. By why? Time for some definitions: Low-carb: Eating an arbitrarily “low” number of carbohydrates, or just a Continue reading >>

Is Your Low Carb Diet Causing Thyroid Issues?

Is Your Low Carb Diet Causing Thyroid Issues?

Is a low carb diet really all it's cracked up to be? While many people find that they can successfully lose weight and kick hormonal imbalances to the curb on a very low carbohydrate diet, sometimes after an initial period of success, the weight comes back. Or fatigue sets in. The outer edges of the eyebrows may even begin thin. These may be signs of an underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism. Having trouble dragging yourself out of bed in the morning? Gaining weight for no reason at all? If a low carb diet has imbalanced your thyroid hormones, try integrating grain-like seeds, starchy vegetables, and fermented vegetables into your diet, made with the Veggie Culture Starter. Hibernation syndrome sounds like what you might expect: It is identified by weight gain, the desire to sleep, and cold extremities. There is a reason why hypothyroid symptoms may pop up several months after abruptly changing the diet from carb-heavy to carb-empty. How Low Carb Thyroid Problems Occur Many grains and grain-based foods (not to be confused with the recommended Body Ecology grain-like seeds, which are not true grains) are capable of damaging the lining of the digestive system. Over the long haul, this can contribute to imbalances in the immune system. When eaten in large quantities (think USDA Food Pyramid), these grains can also do things like: Feed disease-causing bugs, such as yeasts, fungi, parasites, and bacteria. Play a role in micronutrient and mineral deficiency. Generate insulin resistance and block hormone receptors. Contribute to a wide range of inflammatory disorders. Accelerate aging at a molecular level. When you go on a very low carbohydrate diet, you remove all grains, as well as most fruits and starchy vegetables. Removing the damaging refined grains can explain the initi Continue reading >>

Top 15 Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Diet

Top 15 Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Diet

Weight loss isn’t a linear process. If you weigh yourself every day, then there will be days where the scale goes down, other days where it goes up. It doesn’t mean that the diet isn’t working, as long as the general trend is going downwards. Many people lose a lot of weight in the first week of low-carbing, but it is mostly water weight. Weight loss will slow down significantly after that initial phase. Of course, losing weight is not the same as losing fat. It is possible, especially if you’re new to weight lifting, that you are gaining muscle at the same time that you’re losing fat. To make sure that you’re losing, use something other than just the scale (which is a big, fat liar). Use a measuring tape to measure your waist circumference and have your body fat percentage measured every month or so. Also, take pictures. Take note of how your clothes fit. If you’re looking thinner and your clothes are looser, then you ARE losing fat no matter what the scale says. Bottom Line: Weight loss isn’t linear and there’s a lot more to weight than just body fat. Be patient and use other ways of measuring than just the scale. Some people are more carb sensitive than others. If you’re eating low-carb and your weight starts to plateau, then you may want to cut back on carbs even further. In that case, go under 50 grams of carbs per day. When you go under 50 grams per day then you’re going to have to eliminate most fruits from your diet, although you can have berries in small amounts. If that doesn’t work either, going under 20 grams temporarily can work… eating just protein, healthy fats and leafy green vegetables. To make sure that you’re really eating low-carb, create a free account on Fitday and log your food intake for a while. Bottom Line: If you ar Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dieting Myths

Low Carb Dieting Myths

The myths about low carb dieting and specifically ketogenic diets abound in the American collective consciousness. These are just a few of the most pervasive myths I've encountered, with explanations as to why they are incorrect and simply don't make sense, scientifically: Myth 1: Carbs are an essential nutrient for good health. Some nutrition professionals still believe that carbohydrates are necessary to provide glucose to fuel the brain and avoid hypoglycemia. It's an old way of thinking, and it's just not true scientifically. Essential nutrients are nutrients which your body cannot make, so they have to be obtained on a daily basis from your food sources. There are essential proteins, and essential fatty acids, but there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. When the body is in ketosis, it has a “glucose sparing” effect. First, the skeletal muscles burn fatty acids preferentially which spares glucose for the brain to use. Second, once a person is keto-adapted, the brain switches to using ketone bodies for over half of the fuel it needs, and less glucose is needed since ketone bodies are being used as an alternative fuel. This small amount of carbohydrate (glucose or blood sugar) needed to fuel the brain during keto adaptation can be generated internally. Your liver can make all the glucose needed for brain function from glycogen stored in the liver. And if need be, the body can also make glucose from the protein in your food. Hence, carbohydrates are NOT essential nutrients, and many people, such as the Inuit of Alaska and the Masai of Africa live without them for long periods of time without any effect on health and well-being. The “brain needs carbs” idea is only true if you consistently eat a high carb diet (as most registered dietitians will tel Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Is Low Carb Bad For Hypothyroidism?

Is Low Carb Bad For Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism is becoming increasingly more common in Western countries. One of the main symptoms of this hormone disorder is a slower metabolism and gradual weight gain. Low carb and ketogenic diets have emerged as popular approaches to weight loss, at least in otherwise healthy individuals. But there is some controversy over the safety of these eating patterns for hypothyroidism. This article reviews the scientific evidence available. What is a Low Carbohydrate Diet and Ketogenic Diet? A low carbohydrate (low carb) diet is any eating pattern that limits carbohydrate consumption. The standard Western diet is about 50-60% energy carbs, or roughly 300 grams per day. Low-carb diets are typically 30% energy or lower, although there is no set criteria. However, there is a clear distinction between a low carb diet and a ketogenic diet. A ketogenic diet (keto diet) is a very-low carb diet that restricts carbs to less than 20-50 grams per day, or less than 10% of total energy intake. This makes the body switch to ketones for energy – produced from fats – rather than glucose from carbs. Hence the name ketogenic diet. Summary: Low carb diets restrict carbohydrates to less than 30% of total energy intake, while ketogenic diets restrict to less than 10%. A ketogenic diet causes the body to shift to using ketones as energy, rather than glucose. Carbohydrates and Thyroid Health Thyroid hormones are essential to maintain and regulate carbohydrate/energy metabolism (1). Conversely, the energy (glucose) we get from carbs is required to fuel the production of thyroid hormones. This is because the parts of the brain ultimately responsible for thyroid hormone regulation – the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland – require glucose to function. In fact, the main regulation hormone, Continue reading >>

Why I Ditched Low Carb

Why I Ditched Low Carb

Of course I won’t throw my potato at you, Sweet Pea, because I plan on eating it!! With LOTS of butter! Ann Marie, I just love you because, with your suggestions, I have made my biggest strides in recovery. But returning to carbs has been an absolute blessing from above! I have struggled with my temps for years. At one point I was put on Cytomel to bring them back up. Which it did, but as soon any situation made me falter, my doctor upped my dose to bring them back up. I ended up being hyperthryoid, so he took me off cold turkey. I later found out that stopping thyroid meds that way can be deadly. Which didn’t surprise me because at that time I felt like I was dying. Needless to say my temps absolutely plummeted. In retrospect, I have suffered with adrenal issues for most of my life, but that situation started a complete down-fall that I am still trying to recover from today. When I burned out to the point of total bedrest, my new doctor took me off everything. He told me to limit my carbs because it would be too energizing to my adrenals. No sugar, no fruit, no caffeine, no alcohol and especially, no wheat. He said it clogged the thyroid. I felt like it would have been easier to graze on the grass in my backyard. But I listened to what he said and was pretty much living a paleo lifestyle, although I didn’t know it then. While I finally got off of bedrest, I am still house-bound three years later. I was so frustrated! I felt schlumpy, fat and like a potato. I couldn’t understand if I was eating so well, why wasn’t I getting better during those three years? Well, Ann Marie to the rescue!! When I read about upping my carbs to bring up my temps and feel better overall, it made total sense to me. I had no fear in giving it a whirl because I’ve got nothing to los Continue reading >>

How Low-carb Diets Wrecked Our Health: As Women Reveal How They Suffered Fertility Problems, Thin Hair And Fragile Bones, Do You Still Fancy A Trendy High-protein Diet?

How Low-carb Diets Wrecked Our Health: As Women Reveal How They Suffered Fertility Problems, Thin Hair And Fragile Bones, Do You Still Fancy A Trendy High-protein Diet?

Brooke Power, 27, suffered migraines and dizziness Nutritionists say a balanced diet is better Gillian O'Toole, 32, nearly passed out on the Paleo Diet Emma-Victoria Houlton loves her food; whether it's a Sunday roast with all the trimmings or an Italian meal, she's always happy to tuck in. But just five years ago, Emma, 29, would have baulked at eating pasta, bread, pizza dough, potatoes and Yorkshire puddings. Why? Because, like thousands of others, she believed high-protein, low-carb regimes like the Atkins or Paleo diets were the most effective way to be slim. Diet damage: Emma-Victoria Houlton, left, broke a bone in her foot due to calcium deficiency while Brooke Power, right, suffered migraines and dizziness during ten months on a low carb diet But, after cutting down on carbs so much that she wouldn't even eat dairy products as they contain lactose - a sugar - Emma-Victoria believes she has permanently damaged her health. 'I was only a size eight but found it hard to stay slim,' she says. 'Then, when I was 22, I saw a documentary about the Atkins diet, thought it was great and cut most carbs out of my diet. 'Breakfast was an omelette, lunch was chicken with lettuce and dinner was something meaty with vegetables like kale, cabbage, sprouts or runner beans, which don’t contain starch. 'I got all the classic symptoms associated with a low-carb diet: dry mouth, tiredness, crankiness and bad breath. But I saw great results - my 8st 7lb weight was much easier to maintain.' Unbelievably, Emma-Victoria, a creative director in Manchester, stuck to the regime for three punishing years. 'At restaurants, every meal had to be steak and salad,' she says. 'I'd go to a friend's house for dinner and if they'd made pasta, I'd eat a tiny amount, so as not to be rude, and end up f Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For Getting Back On Track With Your Low Carb Diet

Top 10 Tips For Getting Back On Track With Your Low Carb Diet

We all falter sometimes. If you want to get back on track with your healthy low carb or keto diet, keep reading. The best tips from the low carb experts! Okay, so you fell off the wagon with a resounding thud. Maybe it was a one-time indiscretion and you just cheated a little, or maybe you’ve been off the wagon for days or weeks. Or even months. But you’ve picked yourself up and you want to clamber back on as soon as possible. You’re covered in dust from your fall, you ache all over, but that wagon is sitting there waiting for you, ready to welcome you back with open arms. All you have to do is put one foot in front of the other. Sounds easy but sometimes it can seem absolutely monumental. I get it. I am writing this because I had a little fall of my own recently. It was only a meal’s worth of cheating but it made me feel absolutely awful the next day. Shaky, bloated, exhausted, tummy issues, the works. In spite of that, or perhaps because of it, I knew I had to get back on track right away. My health is too important to me to let things go any further. But I know I will fall again and so I thought it might be helpful to talk about those little tips and tricks that help you get back to your healthy diet a little more easily. 1. Whatever you do, don’t beat yourself up! If you read nothing else but this one tip, that’s fine. But please take this advice to heart, because it is far and away the most important tip I am going to share. I am part of a lot of forums for low carb and Keto diets and there is always someone flagellating themselves for cheating, for failing, for not having the willpower to stick it out. Well guess what? We ALL fail at this sometimes. Let’s face it, we live in a sugar and gluten-filled world. Unless we are hermits that don’t ever lea Continue reading >>

Can Low-carb Diets Result In Hair Loss?

Can Low-carb Diets Result In Hair Loss?

Is it possible to lose hair when starting a low-carb diet? Yes, and there are many misunderstandings and myths about it. Here’s what you may need to know. Temporary hair loss can occur for many different reasons, including any big dietary change. This is especially common when severely restricting calories (e.g. starvation diets, meal replacements) but it can also occasionally happen on low-carb diets. If so, it usually starts 3-6 months after starting a new diet, at which point you’ll notice an increasing amount of hairs falling out when brushing your hair. The good news is that even if you should be so unfortunate this is only a temporary phenomenon. And only a percentage of the hair will fall out (the thinning will rarely be very noticeable to others). After a few months all the hair follicles will start to grow new hair, and when they have regrown your hair will be as thick as before again. Of course, if you have long hair this could take a year or even more. Background To understand exactly what is happening it’s necessary to know the basics of how hair grows. Every single hair on your head usually grows for about 2-3 years at a time. After that it stops growing for up to 3 months. Then a new hair starts growing in the same hair follicle, pushing the old hair out. Thus you’re losing hairs every day, but as the hairs are unsynchronized it’s not so noticeable. You lose one hair and another starts growing, i.e. you always have about the same number of hairs on your head. Stress and synchronized hair loss If your body experiences significant stress more hairs than usual can enter the resting phase at the same time. This can happen for many reasons, like these: Starvation, including calorie-restricted diets and meal replacements Diseases Unusually demanding ex Continue reading >>

Dietitian Weighs In On The Keto Diet

Dietitian Weighs In On The Keto Diet

Another day, another fad diet. There’s Atkins, South Beach, paleo, Whole30, Sugar Busters—too many to name. These days the buzz seems to be about a weight-loss craze called the keto diet. But it’s hard to sift through the contradictory advice found online. Two pounds of bacon a day? That can’t be good for you. To help separate fact from fiction, Health Beat spoke with Kirsten Vereecken, RD, CSP, a registered dietitian at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet was developed at the Mayo Clinic in 1924 as a way to treat epilepsy in children. Although it was effective at controlling seizures, the diet fell by the wayside when new anti-seizure medications came on the market in the following decades. In recent years, the ketogenic diet has made a comeback, and medical teams are again using it as a therapy for kids with epilepsy whose seizures can’t be fully controlled by medications. The goal of the keto diet is to put the patient into what’s called a state of ketosis through a food regimen that’s high in fat and ultra-low in carbohydrates, with moderate amounts of protein. In simple terms, Vereecken said, ketosis is a metabolic shift in which the body uses fat as the primary energy source rather than carbs. “When we eat carbohydrates, the carbs are converted to glucose, and that’s our energy source. When we don’t have carbohydrates to do that, then our body burns fat,” she said. The process starts in the liver, where fatty acids are converted into ketone bodies, or ketones. Elevated levels of ketones in the blood leads to ketosis, which can decrease the frequency of seizures—though experts still don’t know exactly how this works in the brain. The important point, Vereecken said, is that the Continue reading >>

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