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Keto Potassium Citrate

8 Essential Tips On Fasting

8 Essential Tips On Fasting

“What a noble soul must one have, to descend of one's own free will to a diet which even those who have been sentenced to death have not to fear! This is indeed forestalling the spearthrusts of Fortune.” —Seneca, Moral Letters to Lucilius. Letter 18 Fasting is an awesome way to ramp up your insulin sensitivity, crush inflammation of any kind, train your fat metabolism, destroy precancerous growths, and combat the common diseases of civilization. It’s the ultimate physiological reset. If you’re already on ketogenic or otherwise low-carb-high-fat (LCHF) diet, fasting for a few days to a week shouldn’t be much of a struggle. We’ve picked up a few tricks along that way, however, that can not just ease the discomfort, but make the experience downright pleasurable. The goal at the start of your fast is to enter deep ketosis ASAP, so these recommendations on fasting are applicable to the maintenance of nutritional ketosis, as well. Supplement with magnesium and potassium. Without these electrolytes, you may begin to suffer from insomnia and obnoxious muscle twitches around day two or three. I do 400 milligrams (a standard supplement pill) twice a day of magnesium and one gram of potassium citrate (about 1/8 teaspoon) two or three times a day. Add sodium and calcium if the above trio doesn’t fully do the trick. Anyone on a ketogenic diet should be supplementing with similar doses already. Don’t stop exercising, but keep it light and aerobic—you should be able to easily hold a conversation and shouldn’t have to open your mouth to breath. A lengthy walk or an easy run is a great way to boost ketosis. Aerobic exercise and direct sunlight also significantly decrease cortisol, the stress hormone that causes muscle wasting and can stymie fat-burning and ketone p Continue reading >>

Ketogains “must-have Supplements”

Ketogains “must-have Supplements”

Low-carb diets lower insulin levels, which makes the kidneys excrete excess sodium from the body. This can lead to a mild sodium deficiency. This is one of the main reasons people get lightheadedness, fatigue, headaches and even constipation on a low carb diet. Aim for 5000 to 7000 mg spread throughout the day, via broth, bouillon, pickle juice, colored salt, or even sodium pills. 3 Comments Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To Micronutrients In The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To Micronutrients In The Ketogenic Diet

When excluding particular foods, food categories, or macronutrient groups from the diet, the opportunity for deficiency to present itself increases. Therefore, it is no surprise that pushback against the ketogenic diet cites vitamin, mineral, or other nutrient deficiencies as a reason to think twice before restricting carbohydrate content in the diet. However, a close examination of our foods and their contents strongly supports the consumption of animal products. In fact, removing animal products from the diet poses more of a risk to the development of nutrient deficiencies than removing carbohydrate-rich products. This is particularly true when looking beyond the nutrient content of the food to how the nutrients are absorbed and metabolized. In general, meat and other animal products do not limit or may promote nutrient absorption, while plants can often contain antinutrients like phytates, oxalates, or glucosinolates which reduce nutrient absorption, nullifying any benefits associated with their contents. So... what nutrients are lacking in a ketogenic diet? Vitamins Sources: National Institute of Health, Daily Values National Institute of Health, Recommended Intake Vitamin A Cruciferous vegetables (kale, spinach, broccoli), dairy (cheese), and meat (beef liver, fish) are rich in vitamin A. Interestingly, 1 ounce of beef liver would provide nearly 100% of the DV for vitamin A (a tablespoon of butter can also provide over 5%). Vitamin A is NOT lacking in a ketogenic diet. Here we say B “complex,” as this group includes thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, biotin, folate, and cobalamin. The B vitamin complex is an interesting one because we’re told to eat grains and cereal to get B vitamins. Grains and cereal don’t actually contain much B Continue reading >>

Potassium Is The Most Important Electrolyte

Potassium Is The Most Important Electrolyte

Our Educational Content is Not Meant or Intended for Medical Advice or Treatment Potassium : The Most Important Electrolyte Dr. Eric Berg If you take salt and put it into water and dissolve, it disassociates the sodium and chloride disconnect and they become two separate minerals. And that fluid is very electrically conductive. So, basically electrolytes have to do with minerals that help control elec. In the body and they control many bodily functions. Electrolytes you have and need Sodium Magnesium Potassium Chlorides Calcium All of those minerals. Potassium: The Highest RDA of All Minerals - and the Hardest to Get Now, potassium out of all the electrolytes is the one that we need in very large quantities. I was curious, why is that? Why do we need potassium in such large amount's - 4,700 to 6,400 mgs a day. That's 7 to 10 cups plus of salad or vegetable a day. That's a HUGE amount of necessary potassium and such a high requirement that is very hard to meet. There's something in the body called the sodium-potassium pump. It's built into a little protein, attached to an enzyme on the surface of your cells. You have 800,000 to 30 millions of these in your body. They're little generators that allow things to enter into the cells and they take a lot of energy to work. In fact, one third of all the food you eat goes to running those pumps. You also have another pump in the stomach called the hydrogen-potassium ATP-and it's a pump to help you create stomach acid to help you digest foods. These pumps are in various places in the body including the muscles and the nervous system. In fact, the ones in your nervous system takes up 60% of your bodies caloric intake of energy. So, these pumps are critically important in exchanging nutrition, glucose, amino acids, and other minera Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

My Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: Day 54 + Potassium Deficiency

My Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: Day 54 + Potassium Deficiency

Weight: 154 lb Transgressions: TNTC (too numerous to count) Exercise: none Comments The Potassium Problem My current food intake on the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet appears to be low in potassium, which might have long-term health consequences if followed for many months or years. According to the Linus Pauling Institute’s Micronutrient Information Center, adequate potassium intake apparently decreases blood pressure, reduces salt sensitivity, decreases risk of kidney stones, and protects against osteoporosis and stroke. These associations between higher potassium intake and lower condition rates are based mostly on observational studies of populations in which some people eat little potassium and others eat a lot. It’s assumed that people with higher potassium intake are eating more fruits and vegetables, not taking supplements. The Linus Pauling Institute agrees with the U.S. Institute of Medicine’s “Adequate Intake” value for potassium of 4,700 mg daily for average adults. The current U.S. Food and Drug Administration Daily Value is about 3,500 mg. I’m only getting 2,000 mg/day now. Multivitamin/multimineral supplements in the U.S. provide a maximum of 99 mg potassium (by law?). I bought a potassium gluconate supplement at CVS Pharmacy last night: 90 mg potassium, a drop in the bucket. I dropped into a Hi Health vitamin store (health food store?) today and would swear I saw a combined magnesium and potassium supplement that contained 150 mg potassium. Excess potassium intake can be life-threatening in certain situations such as kidney impairment and use of medications like potassium-sparing diuretics and ACE inhibitors. Relatively high meat intake tends to create an acidic environment in the body, which our bones help to buffer or counteract. In the proce Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets And Potassium Deficiency

Low-carb Diets And Potassium Deficiency

As an adherent to the low-carb lifestyle (and currently on a cut) I’m acutely aware that I might not getting enough potassium: potassium is required for ketogenesis as well as supporting exercise 1. Can I get enough without eating bananas or other carbs? Potassium is primarily found in fruit and is essential to our health. The recommended daily amount for an adult male is 4,700mg but less than 2,900mg may be lead to deficiency 2. What good is potassium? Potassium deficiency may cause chronic health problems like muscle cramping, weakness, fatigue, arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) and digestive issues. A deficiency may also cause high blood pressure while a major study suggests that potassium supplements may reduce systolic blood pressure by ~8 points 3. Getting the required daily amount of potassium reduces the chance of stroke and osteoporosis. Potassium (combined with sodium, which none of us is deficient in due to it’s over-use in prepared foods) is an electrolyte required for muscle contraction – not just in muscles like the biceps but also the heart. Potassium is required to break down carbohydrates and make amino acids from proteins therefore a deficiency of potassium will negatively effect metabolism. Potassium is essential for ketogenesis (burning fat as energy) and flushed from the body during exercise. These two facts make it especially relevant to athletes and body builders. How much potassium do I need? As stated above the recommended daily amount for an adult male is 4.7g. There is no established upper limit but overdosing (called “hyperkalemia”) may be fatal which is why the FDA prohibits supplements from containing more than 99mg of potassium. It would take ~47 pills to reach just the daily requirement! However if kidneys are functioning properl Continue reading >>

Mineral Supplementation On A Keto Diet Is It Necessary?

Mineral Supplementation On A Keto Diet Is It Necessary?

Introduction Contrary to conventional thinking, keto diets can be very healthy. Meat, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts and vegetables are rich in several key nutrients that your body needs on a daily basis. For most people following a well-balanced keto diet, a vitamin supplement usually isn’t necessary. However, in some cases, supplementing with minerals known as electrolytes may be beneficial because your body processes them differently when carb intake is very low, as discussed in this paper by Dr. Steve Phinney, one of the foremost experts in ketogenic diets. 1. Nutritional ketosis: effect on electrolytes According to many health organizations, most people should cut back on sodium in order to prevent high blood pressure and other health problems. On high-carb diets, this might be true. However, on a keto diet, your sodium needs actually increase. When carb intake is dramatically reduced, blood insulin levels decrease. A 2007 review by Tiwari, et al, suggested that under conditions of low insulin, the kidneys absorb less sodium and excrete more into the urine. However, according to Dr. Phinney, the precise reason for increased sodium loss during ketosis appears more complex and isn’t completely understood. Regardless of the mechanism responsible for this effect, if sodium isn’t replaced, you may experience fatigue, weakness, dizziness, headaches, and difficulty concentrating. Moreover, when your body loses sodium, your kidneys increase potassium excretion in an attempt to maintain balance. Symptoms of low potassium levels include muscle cramps, muscle twitching, and heart palpitations, or an increased awareness of your heartbeat. Although many of these side effects are especially noticeable in the first week or two of starting a keto diet (often referred to as “keto Continue reading >>

Top 3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet

Top 3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet

The keto diet is well known for its ability to produce weight loss. It does so through the process of ketosis which helps your body burn fat for energy instead of carbs. But it’s not without its potential downside. With low-carb diets or keto in particular, you often cut down on a lot of food groups and types in order to lose weight which means that you're not only cutting out the bad part but you're also taking out some of the good parts. And, with a shortage of vitamins and minerals, your body in return will feel the effects from it. These effects can make you feel sluggish or tired, and that can be a drag. But there’s good news! Yes, heave a sigh because, with proper planning and awareness, you can avoid these deficiencies of micronutrients and mineral imbalances or fix them accordingly if they do occur. You can achieve this by taking supplements (see our list of favorites) and eating the right foods that will help you achieve a balanced, healthy intake of nutrients while on the ketogenic diet. Here’s everything you need to know about the micronutrients, and mineral deficiencies you are more likely to experience while following a keto diet: Of course, it can be difficult to get all the potassium you need from fruits and vegetables alone, especially when you are restricted to keto-friendly foods only. Therefore we recommend NOW Potassium Citrate to make sure you’re getting the potassium you need. Of course, it can be difficult to get all the potassium you need from fruits and vegetables alone, especially when you are restricted to keto-friendly foods only. Therefore we recommend NOW Potassium Citrate to make sure you’re getting the potassium you need. Additionally, it’s best to use this supplement alongside eating proper fruits and vegetables. It's as easy Continue reading >>

The Healthiest Keto Electrolyte Drink

The Healthiest Keto Electrolyte Drink

Keto And Electrolytes When you are on a ketogenic diet, your body process minerals i a slightly different way. You kidneys will eliminate sodium at a much higher rate when you are restricting carbohydrates. That means that you will have to supplement your sodium intake to match this loss. Dr. Volek And Dr. Phinney in the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living recommend to supplement with at least 3ooo mg of sodium a day. Yes that’s right, 3 GRAMS of salt a day! Not aways easy to do… But very important, as sodium is necessary in the body to maintain potassium and magnesium balance. When sodium is too low, both potassium and magnesium levels will decrease, causing cramps, headaches, dizziness and more. So if you are feeling any of those symptoms, especially at the beginning of keto adaptation, you might be lacking some important minerals! An Easy And Delicious Keto Electrolyte Drink Aloe vera juice is a great supplement to your diet! It contains calcium, magnesium and sodium, and it extremely healing for the gut. It also has a pleasant tart taste which can help reduce sugar cravings! Pair it with the extra tanginess of lemon and it will quench your thirst like nothing else. And don’t worry you will not even taste the sea salt. It’s the perfect refreshment after you practice sports or when you are keto adapting! The perfect drink to replenish electrolytes after sports or when you are keto adapting! Mix all ingredients together, and enjoy. You can use chilled water or drink over ice for extra refreshment. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

The Other Salt: Potassium And Keto Diet

The Other Salt: Potassium And Keto Diet

Potassium is an essential electrolyte and mineral, and not just for athletes. It impacts several functions of the human body including protein synthesis, carbohydrate breakdown, and growth. It also plays a major role in the electrical activity of the heart.[1] The FDA recommends that adults consume 3,500mg of potassium daily.[2] However, if you’re following the keto diet, it can be challenging to make sure you’re getting enough potassium on a daily basis — track this in MyFitnessPal and you’ll likely catch yourself falling way short of 3.5g. You may find yourself needing to rely on supplements instead of scrapping for potassium-rich foods. Below are some ways you can make sure you’re getting enough of this important mineral. Avoid the dangers of potassium deficiency Since many potassium-rich foods are also high in carbohydrates, people who follow the keto diet are at risk for having low potassium levels. Dropping the carbs often means dropping the ‘K’. While the former is not essential to take — your body can generate glucose when needed — the latter is essential to get by diet, even if you need to supplement. Low blood potassium has many dangerous symptoms that include: Weakened muscle contractions, increased blood pressure, and an abnormal heart rhythm.[1] Is my “keto flu” from lack of carbs… or lack of electrolytes?! Exhaustion and muscle cramping can also occur, which newbies to the keto life are sure to attest to. In fact, we even believe that what many people attribute to the “keto flu” — the thought that their bodies aren’t yet fat-adjusted to the low-carb / high-fat living — can also be attributed to the fact that they’re low on potassium or other electrolytes! So to avoid potassium deficiency, you should monitor your daily in Continue reading >>

"keto-flu" And Sufficient Intake Of Electrolytes

People often ask me about potassium deficiency (or any other mineral deficiency) on a low-carb, ketogenic diet. I decided to summarise which minerals you should be aware of and what the adequate intake is... To pin or bookmark an easy to follow guide to keto-flu remedies, have a look at this post! What is "Keto-Flu"? Electrolytes (sodium, magnesium and potassium) are often underestimated on low-carb diets. As low-carb expert and scientific researcher Dr. Volek suggests, mineral and electrolyte management is the key to avoiding side effects typically associated with low carb dieting. When entering the induction phase of a Ketogenic Diet (50 grams or less of total carbs - about 20-30 grams of net carbs), most people experience "keto-flu”. This often scares them off and they start to think that low-carb is not right for their body. The "flu" is nothing else than a result of starving your body of carbohydrates. Stay strong! You can easily counteract these effects by replenishing electrolytes. Make sure you include foods rich in electrolytes in your everyday diet and take food supplements (if needed). Firstly, I would like to share my own experience with electrolyte deficiency. I have been really tired recently. It was actually so bad that I couldn't open my eyes and could barely get up even after 7-9 hours of sleep. Also, my energy levels at gym were very low. I woke up in the middle of the night and experienced heart palpitations (weird feeling that could be described as "heart beating too fast"). I knew what was going on: I was magnesium / potassium deficient. I have been on a low-carb diet for more than a year and always made sure I include food rich in these minerals in my diet. The truth is, I have been so busy recently that I didn't pay enough attention to my diet. Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

Ingredient: Potassium Citrate

Ingredient: Potassium Citrate

Sometimes you just run out of electrolytes from food, and it would be great to be able to grab a commercial electrolytic replacement but they are all full of sugar. You can however always make your own Keto-ade. Continue reading >>

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