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Keto Potassium Citrate

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Bone Broth, Essential Food For Keto Adaptation – Electrolytes And The Ketogenic Diet

Bone broth is one of the most awesome foods in the world- after DHA (found in fish/seafoods) it might be the most powerful nutritional tool available – and it’s cheap to make. How do you avoid discomfort while adapting to low carb? Keep your electrolytes in check – drink lots of BONE BROTH! High carbohydrate diets cause the body to retain a lot of water weight, cutting the carbs results in an initial loss of water weight and with that water goes salt, potassium, and magnesium. Bone broth can alleviate this by replenishing the electrolytes – it can replace many expensive supplements and help keep your sodium, potassium and magnesium levels in line. It’s great to have supplemental magnesium and potassium on hand, especially in the beginning stages of adaptation, but whole foods sources like bone broth can reduce or eliminate the need for many supplements. Collagen, glycine, proline, sodium, magnesium, phosphorous, sulfur, potassium…BONE BROTH is loaded with all of these. If you’re supplementing for magnesium I suggest Magnsium Glycinate. If you’re supplementing potassium I would recommend Potassium Citrate or Potassium Chloride. Bone Broth is a vital missing link that Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. steel_horses

    I've been using Cronometer for 7 weeks now and I can't say enough good things about how awesome it's been to be able to track all my macros and nutrients. I just upgraded to gold and ran a nutrition report and one nutrient I've been chronically low on is potassium. Oracle showed me a list of foods high in potassium but even the best of those might give me 5% of my daily needs. Even most supplements are limited to 2% for some reason. How can I get more potassium into me?

  2. Susan_RD_101

    @steel_horses
    The daily requirement for potassium is an "AI" or "Adequate Intake"; this is the amount of a nutrient that scientists believe is sufficient. An AI is set when there is not enough research to establish a more definitive nutrient requirement.
    All this to say is that nutrition scientists aren't 100% sure how much potassium we need to be healthy and prevent disease, but most professionals agree that the current level is likely higher than we need. In my practice, I ask people to aim for at least a 75% intake of potassium.
    Your best sources of potassium include:
    Cooked swiss chard
    Potatoes
    Pumpkin
    Cooked spinach
    Canned tomato
    Sweet potato
    Bananas

  3. LCHF

    @steel_horses I've read on a few keto forums that if you keep your sodium intake high enough, you shouldn't need to supplement with potassium since your body only dumps the potassium when your sodium levels drop too low. Keep the sodium levels up and the potassium levels stay up too. It is also fairly easy to overdo it on potassium (which is why supplements don't contain much potassium, I believe in the US it's actually a legal requirement by the FDA) and is a serious medical issue, unlike most other vitamins and minerals. So supplement with much caution and don't go too high.
    Keto forums tend to recommend using electrolytes or rehydration salts, or suggest making your own using Lo Salt (or similar low sodium salt) that replace the sodium with potassium.
    If you want to go down the whole foods route, here's a list of the 12 of the best food sources of potassium that I found online:
    (Percentages based on the recommended daily value of 4,700 milligrams for adult men and women.)
    White Beans (4) — 1 cup cooked: 1,004 milligrams
    Lima Beans (5) — 1 cup cooked: 955 milligrams
    Avocado (6) — 1 whole: 690 milligrams
    Broccoli (7) — 1 cup cooked: 458 milligrams
    Sweet Potato (8) — 1 medium: 438 milligrams
    Bananas (9) — 1 medium: 422 milligrams
    Salmon (10) — 3 ounces: 416 milligrams
    Peas (11) — 1 cup cooked: 384 milligrams
    Sardines (12) — 1 can/3.75 grams: 365 milligrams
    Grapefruit (13) — 1 whole: 354 milligrams
    Raw Milk (14) — 1 cup: 260 milligrams
    Grass-Fed Beef (15) — 3 ounces: 237 milligrams

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Symptoms Of Low Potassium Levels: Are You Low In Potassium?

Potassium plays a vital role in heart health, digestive, and muscular function, bone health, and more Only 2 percent of US adults get the recommended daily amount of 4,700 milligrams of potassium Potassium needs to be kept in proper balance with sodium in your blood; if you consume too much sodium, which is common if you eat a lot of processed foods, you’ll have an increased need for potassium By Dr. Mercola Potassium, a mineral and electrolyte, is essential for your cells, tissues, and organs to function properly. It plays a vital role in heart health, digestive, and muscular function, bone health, and more. While potassium is found in many foods commonly consumed in the US – including fruits, vegetables, dairy products, salmon, sardines, and nuts – only 2 percent of US adults get the recommended daily amount of 4,700 milligrams (mg).1 This is especially problematic because potassium is a nutrient that needs to be kept in proper balance with sodium in your blood. If you consume too much sodium, which is common if you eat a lot of processed foods, you'll have an increased need for potassium. Others who are at particular risk of low potassium, or hypokalemia, are those with ch Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. steel_horses

    I've been using Cronometer for 7 weeks now and I can't say enough good things about how awesome it's been to be able to track all my macros and nutrients. I just upgraded to gold and ran a nutrition report and one nutrient I've been chronically low on is potassium. Oracle showed me a list of foods high in potassium but even the best of those might give me 5% of my daily needs. Even most supplements are limited to 2% for some reason. How can I get more potassium into me?

  2. Susan_RD_101

    @steel_horses
    The daily requirement for potassium is an "AI" or "Adequate Intake"; this is the amount of a nutrient that scientists believe is sufficient. An AI is set when there is not enough research to establish a more definitive nutrient requirement.
    All this to say is that nutrition scientists aren't 100% sure how much potassium we need to be healthy and prevent disease, but most professionals agree that the current level is likely higher than we need. In my practice, I ask people to aim for at least a 75% intake of potassium.
    Your best sources of potassium include:
    Cooked swiss chard
    Potatoes
    Pumpkin
    Cooked spinach
    Canned tomato
    Sweet potato
    Bananas

  3. LCHF

    @steel_horses I've read on a few keto forums that if you keep your sodium intake high enough, you shouldn't need to supplement with potassium since your body only dumps the potassium when your sodium levels drop too low. Keep the sodium levels up and the potassium levels stay up too. It is also fairly easy to overdo it on potassium (which is why supplements don't contain much potassium, I believe in the US it's actually a legal requirement by the FDA) and is a serious medical issue, unlike most other vitamins and minerals. So supplement with much caution and don't go too high.
    Keto forums tend to recommend using electrolytes or rehydration salts, or suggest making your own using Lo Salt (or similar low sodium salt) that replace the sodium with potassium.
    If you want to go down the whole foods route, here's a list of the 12 of the best food sources of potassium that I found online:
    (Percentages based on the recommended daily value of 4,700 milligrams for adult men and women.)
    White Beans (4) — 1 cup cooked: 1,004 milligrams
    Lima Beans (5) — 1 cup cooked: 955 milligrams
    Avocado (6) — 1 whole: 690 milligrams
    Broccoli (7) — 1 cup cooked: 458 milligrams
    Sweet Potato (8) — 1 medium: 438 milligrams
    Bananas (9) — 1 medium: 422 milligrams
    Salmon (10) — 3 ounces: 416 milligrams
    Peas (11) — 1 cup cooked: 384 milligrams
    Sardines (12) — 1 can/3.75 grams: 365 milligrams
    Grapefruit (13) — 1 whole: 354 milligrams
    Raw Milk (14) — 1 cup: 260 milligrams
    Grass-Fed Beef (15) — 3 ounces: 237 milligrams

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Dominic D’agostino: Ketosis & Oxygen Toxicity – #187

Dominic D’Agostino is a neuroscientist, a researcher in the fields of molecular pharmacology and physiology, and assistant professor at the University of South Florida. His research on the impact of ketogenic diets on cell metabolism, and their neuroprotective effects on oxygen toxicity, is supported by the Office of Naval Research, US Department of Defense, and the Alzheimer’s Association. Dom is a member of the Aerospace Medical Association, the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine Society, the Society of Neuroscience, the American Physiological Society, and also serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Applied Physiology, and as a reviewer for several other scholarly publications. He is one of the world’s foremost experts on ketosis and ketogenic supplements such as MCT oil. Why you should listen – Dominic comes on Bulletproof Radio, live from the Bulletproof Conference, to discuss his metabolic therapy research, how starvation can be beneficial for brain metabolism, how ketones and ketogenic diets can enhance performance, and the use of MCT oil and ketogenic supplements. Enjoy the show! Enter your email address in the box on the right to receive a free copy of the B Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ashsimmonds

    Fun fact: if following the USDA guidelines you can't simultaneously meet both their potassium and sodium intakes.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23507224

  2. yaterspen

    Geez, TIL indeed. I enjoyed this rather frosty line: "Feasibility studies should precede or accompany the issuing of dietary guidelines to the public." Zing!
    The groups that set the guidelines for millions of people to eat by are hilariously terrible at their job. Obviously they're more influenced by dogma and politics than by science. It's like a kid learning that their parents aren't infallible. I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

  3. ashsimmonds

    BTW, prime TIL karma ammo right there.
    Remember me in your internet point fame speeches...

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