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Keto Potassium Citrate

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

A common question I get asked after clients start a ketogenic diet is “why do I feel lousy?” Like them, you’re probably thinking going keto will provide an immediate mental and physical boost. For some, it will. For others, you may experience adverse symptoms, also known as the “keto flu”. When you start a very low-carb ketogenic diet, you’ll flush water and sodium out of your body in the first few weeks. As your sodium levels fall, so too will potassium levels. This can leave you feeling tired, sluggish, and wondering what you got yourself into. Fear not, it’s only temporary. Here are some suggestions for avoiding key mineral deficiencies when jumping into a ketogenic diet. Sodium One of the biggest health and nutrition “myths” is that you should avoid salt. If you’re fit, healthy, and following a keto diet you’ll lose water and sodium in the first few weeks. For athletes, this problem can be compounded because you also lose sodium through your sweat, and as your sweat rate increases, your sodium and blood volume will decline. Not a good recipe for optimal energy and performance. On the flip side, if you’re overweight, out of shape or in poor health then your body is likely already holding on to too much sodium from high consumption of packaged and processed foods (i.e. sodium is used as the primary preservative) or from chronically elevated insulin levels. Therefore, a low-carb or keto approach is great way to restore healthy levels. Symptoms of low sodium include fatigue, headaches, compromised ability to perform (especially outdoors in the heat) and in more serious cases you may pass out. Remember that most of the sodium in your body is found in your bloodstream, so if your body gets deficient, you don’t have many reserves to tap into. In t Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Potassium Levels: Are You Low In Potassium?

Symptoms Of Low Potassium Levels: Are You Low In Potassium?

Potassium plays a vital role in heart health, digestive, and muscular function, bone health, and more Only 2 percent of US adults get the recommended daily amount of 4,700 milligrams of potassium Potassium needs to be kept in proper balance with sodium in your blood; if you consume too much sodium, which is common if you eat a lot of processed foods, you’ll have an increased need for potassium By Dr. Mercola Potassium, a mineral and electrolyte, is essential for your cells, tissues, and organs to function properly. It plays a vital role in heart health, digestive, and muscular function, bone health, and more. While potassium is found in many foods commonly consumed in the US – including fruits, vegetables, dairy products, salmon, sardines, and nuts – only 2 percent of US adults get the recommended daily amount of 4,700 milligrams (mg).1 This is especially problematic because potassium is a nutrient that needs to be kept in proper balance with sodium in your blood. If you consume too much sodium, which is common if you eat a lot of processed foods, you'll have an increased need for potassium. Others who are at particular risk of low potassium, or hypokalemia, are those with chronic malabsorption syndromes, such as Crohn's disease, or those taking heart medicine (particularly loop diuretics).2 However, anyone who eats a poor diet – an excess of processed foods and not enough fresh, whole foods – is potentially at risk of inadequate potassium levels. Optimizing Your Potassium Level Helps Lower Your Blood Pressure The number of deaths due to hypertension, or high blood pressure, increased nearly 62 percent from 2000 to 2013, according to a new report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).3 Currently, about 70 million US adults struggle with Continue reading >>

My Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: Day 54 + Potassium Deficiency

My Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet: Day 54 + Potassium Deficiency

Weight: 154 lb Transgressions: TNTC (too numerous to count) Exercise: none Comments The Potassium Problem My current food intake on the Ketogenic Mediterranean Diet appears to be low in potassium, which might have long-term health consequences if followed for many months or years. According to the Linus Pauling Institute’s Micronutrient Information Center, adequate potassium intake apparently decreases blood pressure, reduces salt sensitivity, decreases risk of kidney stones, and protects against osteoporosis and stroke. These associations between higher potassium intake and lower condition rates are based mostly on observational studies of populations in which some people eat little potassium and others eat a lot. It’s assumed that people with higher potassium intake are eating more fruits and vegetables, not taking supplements. The Linus Pauling Institute agrees with the U.S. Institute of Medicine’s “Adequate Intake” value for potassium of 4,700 mg daily for average adults. The current U.S. Food and Drug Administration Daily Value is about 3,500 mg. I’m only getting 2,000 mg/day now. Multivitamin/multimineral supplements in the U.S. provide a maximum of 99 mg potassium (by law?). I bought a potassium gluconate supplement at CVS Pharmacy last night: 90 mg potassium, a drop in the bucket. I dropped into a Hi Health vitamin store (health food store?) today and would swear I saw a combined magnesium and potassium supplement that contained 150 mg potassium. Excess potassium intake can be life-threatening in certain situations such as kidney impairment and use of medications like potassium-sparing diuretics and ACE inhibitors. Relatively high meat intake tends to create an acidic environment in the body, which our bones help to buffer or counteract. In the proce Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

How To Prevent Kidney Stones Naturally

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. Anyone who’s had a kidney stone will tell you that they’re one of the worst medical problems you can ever experience. Kidney stones are a common and painful chronic condition seen in otherwise “healthy” patients, and one of the most common disorders of the urinary tract. About a million people in the United States are treated for kidney stones each year, and the prevalence in adult men is almost 12% and around 6% in adult women. (1) Stones are most common in caucasian adults between the ages of 20 and 50, and once someone develops a stone, they are far more likely to develop another stone in the future. Like most chronic diseases, the incidence of kidney stones has been increasing over the past 30 years. (2) This is likely due to the variety of dietary and lifestyle changes we’ve made as Americans which aren’t conducive to good health. What are Kidney Stones? Stones can be formed from a variety of substances, but the most common stones are made of calcium and oxalate that has crystalized in the urinary tract. Other types of stones include struvite, uric acid and cystine. While stones themselves are painful enough, they can lead to more serious conditions such as obstruction of the urinary tract, permanent damage to the kidneys, and even life-threatening infections. I’ve seen patients in the hospital who have come in with necrotic kidneys due to obstruction from a stone, so this can become a serious condition if not managed properly. Conventional medical professionals take a multi-pronged approach to tre Continue reading >>

"keto-flu" And Sufficient Intake Of Electrolytes

People often ask me about potassium deficiency (or any other mineral deficiency) on a low-carb, ketogenic diet. I decided to summarise which minerals you should be aware of and what the adequate intake is... To pin or bookmark an easy to follow guide to keto-flu remedies, have a look at this post! What is "Keto-Flu"? Electrolytes (sodium, magnesium and potassium) are often underestimated on low-carb diets. As low-carb expert and scientific researcher Dr. Volek suggests, mineral and electrolyte management is the key to avoiding side effects typically associated with low carb dieting. When entering the induction phase of a Ketogenic Diet (50 grams or less of total carbs - about 20-30 grams of net carbs), most people experience "keto-flu”. This often scares them off and they start to think that low-carb is not right for their body. The "flu" is nothing else than a result of starving your body of carbohydrates. Stay strong! You can easily counteract these effects by replenishing electrolytes. Make sure you include foods rich in electrolytes in your everyday diet and take food supplements (if needed). Firstly, I would like to share my own experience with electrolyte deficiency. I have been really tired recently. It was actually so bad that I couldn't open my eyes and could barely get up even after 7-9 hours of sleep. Also, my energy levels at gym were very low. I woke up in the middle of the night and experienced heart palpitations (weird feeling that could be described as "heart beating too fast"). I knew what was going on: I was magnesium / potassium deficient. I have been on a low-carb diet for more than a year and always made sure I include food rich in these minerals in my diet. The truth is, I have been so busy recently that I didn't pay enough attention to my diet. Continue reading >>

Tl;dr: Key Amounts Per Serving:

Tl;dr: Key Amounts Per Serving:

Nutrition for v2.0.1 & v2.0.2 Salted Caramel shown above (replaced Soy Lecithin with Sunflower Lecithin). See the Change Log for a complete list of changes to the recipe. Ingredients: Whey Protein Isolate, Acacia Gum, Vitamin Blend (Vitamin A Palmitate, Cholecalciferol, dl-alpha-Tocopheryl Acetate, Mixed Tocopherols, L-Methylfolate, Methylcobalamin, Niacinamide, Calcium d-Pantothenate, Thiamin HCl, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine HCl, Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin K2, Boron Amino Acid Complex, Dicalcium Phosphate, Chromium Picolinate, Copper Gluconate, Potassium Iodide, Ferrous Gluconate, Magnesium Citrate, Manganese Sulfate, Molybdenum, Nickelous Sulfate, Selenomethionine, Vanadyl Sulfate, Zinc Gluconate, Choline L-Bitartrate, Lutein, Lycopene), Potassium Citrate, Salt, Xanthan Gum, Potassium Chloride, Sunflower Lecithin, Natural Flavors, Sucralose. Specific flavors also contain: Peanut Flour, Cocoa Powder, Coffee Powder, Caffeine, Caramel Color, Tumeric (for color), Beet Juice Extract (for color), Artificial Flavor. See the flavor labels below for more information. Contains: Milk, the Chocolate Peanut Butter flavor contains peanuts. Think that’s a lot of “chemicals” with crazy sounding names? check this out (high-res PDF version). Alanine 1.33g Arginine 0.61g Aspartic Acid 2.81g Cystine 0.75g Glutamic Acid 4.96g Glycine 0.46g Histidine 0.44g Isoleucine 1.62g Leucine 2.81g Lysine 2.81g Methionine 0.58g Phenylalanine 0.84g Proline 1.60g Serine 1.07g Threonine 1.77g Tryptophan 0.46g Tyrosine 0.78g Valine 1.33g Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

When starting a ketogenic diet, some people experience initial side effects from carbohydrate restriction known as ‘keto flu.’ These symptoms can have some mild and potentially severe effects on the body. While the condition is popularly known as keto flu, people also commonly refer to it as induction flu, low carb flu, and Atkins flu. This article will explain what it is, why it happens, and the best strategies for avoiding or beating it. What is the Keto Flu? Firstly, it is not the real flu. It just shares the name because it has several of the same symptoms. Coming from a high carbohydrate diet, the body is well-adapted to using glucose for fuel. However, when restricting carbohydrate, the supply of glucose falls before the body has adapted to burning fat for fuel. In other words, your body is in ketosis but not fully keto-adapted. If you are curious about this, you can find out your level of ketosis by using ketone strips. The liver and gall-bladder need time to upregulate the number of fat-burning enzymes to burn larger amounts of fat efficiently. Severely restricting carbohydrate is a massive change to the way the body works and your body needs time to adjust to the metabolic changes. When Does it Start? There is no exact timeframe, but symptoms may appear as quickly as 10-12 hours after starting to restrict carbohydrate. For some people, it might be slightly earlier or later. Of course, there are also people who won’t experience the dreaded keto flu at all. How Long Does it Last? Based on anecdotes, this induction flu lasts somewhere between two days and about two weeks. The worst symptoms appear in the first few days and then taper off. Regarding the intensity of the symptoms, this likely depends on the previous diet, hormonal state, and prior carbohydrate Continue reading >>

8 Essential Tips On Fasting

8 Essential Tips On Fasting

“What a noble soul must one have, to descend of one's own free will to a diet which even those who have been sentenced to death have not to fear! This is indeed forestalling the spearthrusts of Fortune.” —Seneca, Moral Letters to Lucilius. Letter 18 Fasting is an awesome way to ramp up your insulin sensitivity, crush inflammation of any kind, train your fat metabolism, destroy precancerous growths, and combat the common diseases of civilization. It’s the ultimate physiological reset. If you’re already on ketogenic or otherwise low-carb-high-fat (LCHF) diet, fasting for a few days to a week shouldn’t be much of a struggle. We’ve picked up a few tricks along that way, however, that can not just ease the discomfort, but make the experience downright pleasurable. The goal at the start of your fast is to enter deep ketosis ASAP, so these recommendations on fasting are applicable to the maintenance of nutritional ketosis, as well. Supplement with magnesium and potassium. Without these electrolytes, you may begin to suffer from insomnia and obnoxious muscle twitches around day two or three. I do 400 milligrams (a standard supplement pill) twice a day of magnesium and one gram of potassium citrate (about 1/8 teaspoon) two or three times a day. Add sodium and calcium if the above trio doesn’t fully do the trick. Anyone on a ketogenic diet should be supplementing with similar doses already. Don’t stop exercising, but keep it light and aerobic—you should be able to easily hold a conversation and shouldn’t have to open your mouth to breath. A lengthy walk or an easy run is a great way to boost ketosis. Aerobic exercise and direct sunlight also significantly decrease cortisol, the stress hormone that causes muscle wasting and can stymie fat-burning and ketone p Continue reading >>

Which Ketone Supplement Should You Use?

Which Ketone Supplement Should You Use?

Searching for a Ketone Supplement can be challenging if you don’t know what you need. Sure, you know you want an efficient way to get into Ketosis, but is there more than one way to do so? More importantly, which ketone supplement works best for situation and taste pallet? It’s also important to know which Exogenous Ketone supplements will actually work. The world of supplementation is full of snake oil salesmen, keen to providing a “miracle cure” to all of your nutritional needs. Because of this, we’re going to break down some of the leading ketone supplements for you, and dissect their benefits, and if any, their weaknesses/drawbacks. It’s important to state that these supplements alone will not allow you to live a Ketogenic lifestyle. Nutritional Ketosis is the base of everything else you try while living the Keto lifestyle; it’s useless to use ketone supplements if you’re loading your face with carbs and sugars, because you’re missing the benefit of the true fat burning experience. So with that caveat out of the way, let’s move into why you would want to use a Ketone Supplement. Energy for “on-the-go” One of the more difficult parts of any diet is applying its demands regularly to food preparation. The Ketogenic Diet requires you to cook with only certain types of ingredients, and eat only certain kind of foods; but what if you wake up late and don’t have time to make your loaded Keto omelet? This is where one of the convenience benefits come into play: by takng a Ketone Supplement on your way to work, you’re providing your body with energy, while also suppressing your appetite to ensure you won’t show up to work jonesing for the office junk food. The perceived “magic” of ketones to satiate appetite comes from what scientists call a Continue reading >>

How To Lose Fat #4: Ketogenic Diet Part 1

How To Lose Fat #4: Ketogenic Diet Part 1

The Ketogenic diet is a daily focus on the consumption of high fat and adequate protein with carbohydrates being very low. The theory is that with ketogenic dieting you’ll be able to lose fat faster by allowing the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Does ketogenic dieting work? Is it unhealthy? Is it healthy? Should you do it? We’ll answer these questions and more! This post should give you everything you need to know about ketogenic dieting in relation to the health and weight loss related questions. So let’s start at the main question… DOES THE KETOGENIC DIET WORK? Ketogenic dieting has a few benefits when it comes to weight loss Below are some excerpts from my book: 30 day paleo weight loss plan: The solution and the science to lose fat fast and live healthy long term (includes what to eat and recipes) It can help with the control of weight, hunger, diet satisfaction and it can help keep your energy levels stable. All this despite you having to drop calories when dieting. This means that instead of feeling like you’re out of energy due to cutting food and feeling like you are still hungry after a meal, a ketogenic diet, with carbohydrates as low as 20grams a day, you will still feel good and feel like you had a decent meal (1) It can help diabetics be in control of their glucose. People trying to lose weight, when choosing to do the ketogenic diet, have been shown to have a better glycemic profile (2) Fights off sugar cravings that most have. If you ever have gone off having no carbohydrates and none of those concentrated sweets for a period of two weeks then you introduced fruit back into your body I can attest that you WILL be able to taste how much sweeter it is Helps with keeping sex hormones like testosterone optimal. When you diet you’ll n Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

Supplement Averts Kidney Stones In Ketogenic Diet

Supplement Averts Kidney Stones In Ketogenic Diet

LITTLE FALLS, N.J., July 22 -- Potassium citrate prevents kidney stones in epileptic children who are on the ketogenic diet, researchers have found. Giving prophylactic potassium citrate to any child who went on the diet reduced the risk of kidney stones from 6.7% to 0.9%, Eric H. Kossoff, MD, of Johns Hopkins, and colleagues reported online in Pediatrics. "We can confidently say this is a safe and powerful way to prevent kidney stones, and it should become part of standard therapy in all ketogenic dieters, not just those who already show elevated urine calcium levels," Dr. Kossoff said. The high-fat, ketogenic diet is used to control epileptic seizures in children who don't respond to medication. But the diet comes with a high risk of kidney stones, which occur in about 6% of children who adhere to it. The researchers theorized that daily potassium citrate, a supplement that alkalinizes the urine and makes urine calcium soluble, could reduce the risk of kidney stones. So they followed 313 children treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital from Jan.1, 2000 to Dec. 31, 2008. Those receiving treatment before 2005 were treated with daily potassium citrate only after being diagnosed with hypercalciuria. Those treated in 2006 or thereafter got the supplement as soon as they started the ketogenic diet. Among children who didn't receive the supplement at all, 10.5% developed kidney stones. In both treatment groups, preventive use decreased the incidence of kidney stones compared with those who didn't receive the supplement at all, the researchers said (P=0.003). But the larger decrease occurred in the youngsters who started the supplement as soon as they started the diet, with a kidney stone incidence of 0.9% compared with an incidence of 6.7% for those who received it only as a respo Continue reading >>

The Other Salt: Potassium And Keto Diet

The Other Salt: Potassium And Keto Diet

Potassium is an essential electrolyte and mineral, and not just for athletes. It impacts several functions of the human body including protein synthesis, carbohydrate breakdown, and growth. It also plays a major role in the electrical activity of the heart.[1] The FDA recommends that adults consume 3,500mg of potassium daily.[2] However, if you’re following the keto diet, it can be challenging to make sure you’re getting enough potassium on a daily basis — track this in MyFitnessPal and you’ll likely catch yourself falling way short of 3.5g. You may find yourself needing to rely on supplements instead of scrapping for potassium-rich foods. Below are some ways you can make sure you’re getting enough of this important mineral. Avoid the dangers of potassium deficiency Since many potassium-rich foods are also high in carbohydrates, people who follow the keto diet are at risk for having low potassium levels. Dropping the carbs often means dropping the ‘K’. While the former is not essential to take — your body can generate glucose when needed — the latter is essential to get by diet, even if you need to supplement. Low blood potassium has many dangerous symptoms that include: Weakened muscle contractions, increased blood pressure, and an abnormal heart rhythm.[1] Is my “keto flu” from lack of carbs… or lack of electrolytes?! Exhaustion and muscle cramping can also occur, which newbies to the keto life are sure to attest to. In fact, we even believe that what many people attribute to the “keto flu” — the thought that their bodies aren’t yet fat-adjusted to the low-carb / high-fat living — can also be attributed to the fact that they’re low on potassium or other electrolytes! So to avoid potassium deficiency, you should monitor your daily in Continue reading >>

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