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Keto Metabolic Damage

Ketosis: The Fastest Way To Lose Weight If You Weigh 200 Pounds Or More

Ketosis: The Fastest Way To Lose Weight If You Weigh 200 Pounds Or More

You’ve probably tried to lose weight many times with little to no success. Maybe you lost some weight, but it either always came back or your program wasn’t sustainable, so you quit. If you’re looking for a way to lose weight if you weigh 200 lbs or more, you’ve come to the right place. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from my 11 years working with thousands of clients, it’s that there is A LOT of emotional and mental pain associated with weight gain, especially when you’re weight has gotten this bad. It might even make you angry or sad thinking about it now, but I want to assure you of one thing before I get into the process: You can either let your past decisions define and/or confine you, or you can choose to move on. Yes, your past decisions (or lack of action) have affected, maybe negatively, maybe REALLY negatively, your current situation. However, your past can’t be undone, BUT your past results (where you are now) CAN (where you want to be). You can choose to move on, leave it behind you and start focusing on your present! It’s going to take time, but it’s far from impossible. In fact, I know you can do it. As with pretty much every thing that’s worth it, the transformation won’t happen overnight. It may take a year or more to lose the weight. The good news? If you follow this article, you’ll lose weight fast and if you stay consistent, you’ll keep losing weight, and then a year will come and go and you would have lost a significant amount of weight. And you’ll keep it off! Diabesity Is America’s #1 Killer: Why We NEED The Ketogenic Diet In Our Lives Obesity and metabolic diseases, like diabetes have become the world’s biggest health problems. In fact, at least 2.8 million adults die from obesity-related causes each year. Met Continue reading >>

Reverse Dieting - How To Correctly Eat After A Cutting Diet

Reverse Dieting - How To Correctly Eat After A Cutting Diet

Editor's note: This article by John Gorman originally appeared on Machine Muscle. Writing this article is something I have wanted to do for a long time. I see competitor after competitor blow up and gain way too much fat directly after a show. As a matter of fact, I've been there myself a few times and know exactly what it feels like firsthand. The good news is that there is a way to stay very lean in the off-season, yet grow and put a good amount of muscle on. It's called reverse dieting. MTS CEO Marc Lobliner discusses how to reverse diet until you hit your maintenance level. What is Reverse Dieting? Reverse dieting is simply adding calories back into your diet while pulling back on the amount of cardio required to get into contest shape. Sound easy? Then why is it so hard to do? Honestly, it's because after being at a caloric deficit for so long, not only is your body screaming, "feed me!", your brain is screaming the same thing. Don't fear though, I am going to give you a full system to use. Even though each person is different and there may need to be some altering of this plan, I'll lay out. It will get you pretty close if you stick to it like glue. Related: The Fat Loss Factor E-Book by Marc Lobliner What we usually see when someone finishes a show (or cutting diet) is they go out and have a nice cheat meal with family and friends, which is fine. I actually encourage it. Then Sunday comes and there's breakfast and a few more meals off the plan, which is fine as well. The problem people run into is they actually go WAY off the deep end and eat way past being comfortably full. They also continue this eating into the week after the show. Once you fill the muscles up after a few big meals, you will quickly start to spill over into the fat cell. I have seen people (my Continue reading >>

What A Broken Metabolism Feels Like

What A Broken Metabolism Feels Like

Lost some weight doing HCG or some other very low calorie diet and now put on fat just looking at food? Your metabolism might be broken. Let's fix it... ​Every time I see someone promoting a VLCD (Very Low Calorie Diet) as a lifestyle diet I just want to slap them in the greedy little faces. We once promoted it. We tried it and lost weight. Then we slapped ourselves in the impatient faces when we finished the diet and found we would put on fat eating a f*(n salad. ​So we got fat and blamed ourselves. "Low self control," we said. Out came the whip of self loathing... Jokes. We don't do that shit. We don't hate ourselves when we try something and fail! That just doesn't help. Instead, we educate ourselves. Which is what I'm going to do here for you. Save you the 5 years of yo-yo dieting we went through... A very low calorie diet should only be done once in your life... ever. Unless you're in the first 3 months post partum, you risk permanently shutting down your metabolism by repeatedly starving yourself. If you've done a HCG diet before, then you should NEVER do it again. And if someone tells you to, especially if that someone profits from you (buying their magic woo-woo potion), run away and never buy anything from that low life, cash guzzling monster again. NOTE: This post is not about doing HCG or a low calorie diet, it's about what to do if you have done one and want to actually eat something again. ​ How to Know If Your Metabolism Is Broken​ first, let's quickly work out if your metabolism is running ineffectively... Fill in the following form: Gender MaleFemale Age Weight kglb Height cmft Submit ​Scroll down to the bottom of the results, and you'll see the following table: Your numbers will be different to the above ones, but whatever they are, you ​sho Continue reading >>

Can You Really Fix Your Metabolism With The Keto Diet?

Can You Really Fix Your Metabolism With The Keto Diet?

The new best-selling book “The Keto Reset Diet” says it can fix a sluggish metabolism and train your body to be a fat-burning machine. Experts are skeptical. It isn’t just you. Dieting is an endless pursuit for many Americans. Around 45 million Americans go on a diet each year. And the weight eventually comes back for 33 to 66 percent of people who’ve dieted. In the New York Times best-seller “The Keto Reset Diet: Reboot Your Metabolism in 21 Days and Burn Fat Forever,” author and keto diet enthusiast Mark Sisson writes that “yo-yo dieting is severely destructive to your metabolism.” He claims that following a low-carb, high-fat diet will help “turn you into a ‘fat-burning beast’ and stay this way for the rest of your life.” The book explains that the three-week keto reset diet does this by reprograming your genes into a state of “metabolic efficiency” — which he considers burning fat, rather than being “dependent upon regular high-carbohydrate meals to sustain your energy, mood, or cognitive focus.” Critics say the science doesn’t support these claims. Does yo-yo dieting really affect your metabolism? A person’s resting metabolic rate (RMR) is largely based on their weight, but factors like age and genetics also play a role. When someone significantly restricts calories to lose weight, their body can also enter starvation mode. Their metabolism slows down considerably to conserve energy. Extremely low-calorie diets make it easier to regain weight after a diet is over. If someone with a slowed metabolism hits their target weight and celebrates by eating the same amount of daily calories a person with a typical RMR and of their same weight and age would eat, they could gain weight rapidly. Case in point: contestants from the TV show Continue reading >>

Will A Low-carb Diet Ruin Your Metabolism?

Will A Low-carb Diet Ruin Your Metabolism?

There is a lot of confusion within the low-carb community about metabolism. Carbs seem to be a scapegoat that people like to blame when weight loss doesn’t happen fast and easy. If you are following a low carb diet and struggling to succeed, you might believe that all the years you spent eating carbohydrates to your heart's content must have destroyed your metabolism and made you fat. Otherwise, you'd be able to eat like normal folks. Maybe, you are questioning the validity of low-carb diets. You live on the other side of the argument and think that carbohydrate restriction will permanently alter your metabolism, thereby making it impossible to ever return to a well-balanced diet. But what’s the truth? Will eating too many carbohydrates, or eating too few, ruin your metabolism – or not? What is Metabolism? Does hearing about the energy equation make you feel nervous or irritable? Many low-carb dieters feel that way. They don't like hearing about calories or thermodynamics and are quick to jump up and defend the low-carb way of life. Regardless of the truth, most people following a low-carb lifestyle would rather believe in low-carb magic. Afterall, Dr. Atkins told you that you no longer need to worry about calories. You don't have to be afraid of fat. You can eat until you are satisfied. So most people believe that the laws of thermodynamics do not apply to low-carb diets. "Calories don’t matter," they often say. Dr. Eades has tried to set the record straight. But, far too many people still do not want to go outside and drag the energy equation back in from the trash and take a closer look. They’d rather leave it out of sight, pretend it doesn’t exist, and let the myths about starvation mode and damaged metabolisms reign in their lives instead. However, we a Continue reading >>

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood

Metabolic Effects Of The Very-low-carbohydrate Diets: Misunderstood "villains" Of Human Metabolism

Go to: The Ketone Bodies are an Important Fuel The hormonal changes associated with a low carbohydrate diet include a reduction in the circulating levels of insulin along with increased levels of glucagon. This activates phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-biphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase and also inhibits pyruvate kinase, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase, and glucokinase. These changes indeed favor gluconeogenesis. However, the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis. In the liver in the well-fed state, acetyl CoA formed during the β-oxidation of fatty acids is oxidized to CO2 and H2O in the citric acid cycle. However, when the rate of mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue is accelerated, as, for example, during very low carbohydrate intake, the liver converts acetyl CoA into ketone bodies: Acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. The liver cannot utilize ketone bodies because it lacks the mitochondrial enzyme succinyl CoA:3-ketoacid CoA transferase required for activation of acetoacetate to acetoacetyl CoA [3]. Therefore, ketone bodies flow from the liver to extra-hepatic tissues (e.g., brain) for use as a fuel; this spares glucose metabolism via a mechanism similar to the sparing of glucose by oxidation of fatty acids as an alternative fuel. Indeed, the use of ketone bodies replaces most of the glucose required by the brain. Not all amino acid carbon will yield glucose; on average, 1.6 g of amino acids is required to synthesize 1 g of glucose [4]. Thus, to keep the brain supplied with glucose at rate of 110 to 120 g/day, the breakdown of 160 to 200 g of protein (close to 1 kg of muscle tissue) would be required. This is clearly undesirable, and the body limits glucose utilization to reduce the need for gluconeogenesis Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet - A Connection Between Mitochondria And Diet

Ketogenic Diet - A Connection Between Mitochondria And Diet

This article is written by Dr Gabriela Segura, Consultant Cardiologist, and published here with her permission. Mitochondria are an essential part of good cardiac function. Numbers in square brackets refer to references at the bottom of the article. Contents 1 Introduction 2 Mitochondrial Dysfunction 3 Ketosis – Closer Look 4 References 5 External links Ketosis is an often misunderstood subject. Its presence is thought to be equal to starvation or a warning sign of something going wrong in your metabolism. But nothing could be farther from the truth, except if you are an ill-treated type 1 diabetic person.[1] Ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. The entire body uses ketones in a more safe and effective way than the energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Our bodies will produce ketones if we eat a diet devoid of carbs or a low carb diet (less than 60 grams of carbs per day).[2] By eating a very low carb diet or no carbs at all (like a caveman) we become keto-adapted. In fact, what is known today as the ketogenic diet was the number one treatment for epilepsy until Big Pharma arrived with its dangerous cocktails of anti-epileptic drugs. It took several decades before we heard again about this diet, thanks in part to a parent who demanded it for his 20-month-old boy with severe seizures. The boy’s father had to find out about the ketogenic diet in a library as it was never mentioned as an option by his neurologist. After only 4 days on the diet, his seizures stopped and never returned.[3] The Charlie Foundation was born after the kid’s name and his successful recovery, but nowadays the ketogenic diet is available to th Continue reading >>

The Lowdown On Keto Side Effects: What’s Real, What’s Not, And What’s Helpful, Written By Mark Sisson

The Lowdown On Keto Side Effects: What’s Real, What’s Not, And What’s Helpful, Written By Mark Sisson

With more people enthusiastic about the ketogenic diet comes more talk about potential adverse side effects. Upon closer examination, almost all of the complaints can be traced to a flawed approach. Granted, if you are coming to the game with significant metabolic damage from decades of carbohydrate dependency, or not paying attention to some common sense best practices, such as choosing healthy foods instead of blindly focusing on macros, you will likely struggle with something as stringent as keto. Let’s cover some of the common keto complaints being bantered about these days, examine what’s really going on, and discuss strategy for how to avoid any adverse side effects to going keto. Keto Flu The keto flu refers to feelings of general malaise and even immune disturbances in association with dietary modification. Commonly cited symptoms include feeling lethargic (especially in the afternoon), feeling hot, feeling achy in joints and muscles, among other related sensations. Here are eight important tips for avoiding the keto flu. Check out the full post for further details. Get sufficient omega-3s, from oily, cold water fish or supplementation. Consume an extra five grams (1 teaspoon) of sea salt or Himalayan pink salt per day when going keto. Consume foods rich in potassium and magnesium. Avocado is an excellent high fat, low carb source for both. Make an extra effort to hydrate strategically, especially around workouts. Consume more healthy, natural fats to replace the carbs you are cutting out. Consume MCT oil (from coconut oil or MCT oil supplements) to stimulate external ketone production. Move frequently and conduct cardio sessions at low heart rates. Try a gradual reduction in carbs if an abrubt reduction seems problematic or you experience keto flu symptoms. Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

Metabolic Damage And Keto Adaptation – Why And How.

Metabolic Damage And Keto Adaptation – Why And How.

I have been getting questions about how to keto adapt, and how long does keto adaption take etc. and does keeping calories up while keto dieting, does this reduce metabolic damage or adaptation even if your carbs are very low? So what this question is kind of centering on is the concept about metabolic damage and adaptation. My take is that your body becomes very efficient at burning calories when you drive your calories lower and lower and do more and more steady state cardio. I’m not talking about 1 or 2 – 45 min cardio sessions a week, I’m talking more about one or two hours of cardio per day. So this is a high amount of cardio and very low calories. Essentially what you’re doing is you’re just kind of metabolically shocking your system and your body responds by becoming a lot more efficient. Now these mechanisms of efficiency are starting to get studied in the scientific world but that’s basically kind of what we are talking about. Right now there isn’t much evidence, but they do believe something is there. The basis of these adaptations is definitely present. So how this does relate specifically to a ketogenic diet, and you know because your carbs are really low, can you still keep your calories high so you don’t get these metabolic adaptations. And the answer is yes. So what about ketosis? Let’s Get Scientific for a Moment This is a really important key to remember, ketosis is not weight loss, instead ketosis is actually a metabolic state when fat is being burned as your primary fuel source and then ketones are being produced. Ketones are by products of fat metabolism. Fat is getting oxidized at a very high rate, which results in ketone production and then you can measure ketones in either your urine (not recommended as I discuss here in my TOP K Continue reading >>

Metabolic Damage, Fat-burning, And Hormone Balancing On Birth Control

Metabolic Damage, Fat-burning, And Hormone Balancing On Birth Control

Keto podcast on making rocket fuel lattes (RFL), how to balance your hormones while on birth control, and steps toward healing metabolic damage. Rocket fuel latte substitutions Balancing hormones on birth control Metabolic damage SHOW NOTES + LINKS The podcast has changed to The Keto Diet Podcast. Subscribe and listen on iTunes or your favorite podcast app. TIMESTAMPS Rocket fuel latte substitutions (13:46) Balancing hormones on birth control (25:29) Metabolic damage (40:42) OUR PARTNERS Get the nourishment your body deserves and try Vital Proteins collagen protein, gelatin or liver capsules today. Today’s mind-blowing episode is brought to you by Genuine Health vegan proteins+. Visit your local health food, grocery, drugstore or online at Vitamart to purchase now! Continue reading >>

The Biggest Loser Fail And That Ketogenic Study Success

The Biggest Loser Fail And That Ketogenic Study Success

This week, splashed all over the New York Times, was an article about a paper written by Kevin Hall, a senior researcher at the National Institutes of Health. It was published in Obesity and titled “Persistent metabolic adaptation 6 years after ‘The Biggest Loser competition“. This generated a lot of hand-wringing about the futility of weight loss. NYT: After ‘The Biggest Loser,’ Their Bodies Fought to Regain Weight The study, along with another study presented by Kevin Hall seemed to generate more anxiety about the insulin hypothesis being dead. Of course, both these studies fit in perfectly with the hormonal view of obesity and reinforces once again the futility of following the Caloric Reduction as Primary approach. You could review my 50ish part series on Hormonal Obesity if you want a more in-depth view. So, let’s dive in an explain the findings of both of Dr. Hall’s excellent papers. His conclusions, well, let’s just say I don’t agree with them. The studies, though, were very well done. The Biggest Loser Let’s start with the first paper about the Biggest Loser. Essentially, what it did was follow 14 of the 16 Biggest Loser contestants. At the end of the show, they had all lost significant amounts of weight following a Eat Less, Move More approach. Contestants eat about 1000 – 1200 calories per day and exercise like mad people. What the study showed is that basal metabolism drops like a piano out of the Empire State building. It plummets. They are burning about 800 calories less per day than previously. The new paper shows that this metabolic rate does not recover even 6 years later. In other words, if you reduce your ‘Calories In’, your ‘Calories Out’ will automatically drop. This makes sense. If your body normally eats 2000 calories Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Stay In Ketosis

Stay In Ketosis

Keep carbs low Eat more fat Test ketones often Overdoing protein is bad Determining your carbohydrate tolerance level is key to getting into ketosis. Every person is different so therefore, there is no real set number for people to abide by when it comes down to knowing exactly what’s needed to acquire the state of ketosis. This is partly why the smackfat routine is the way it is simply because this method of approach is 9/10 a sure way to see success on the first try due to my very own specific experience of living this life for so many years. Usually it would just simply take a person to confide in this diet and truly dive in with both feet and perform their due diligence of personal experimentation to find what exactly there sweet spot is with tolerance. This tends to be a problem for many basically because this diet is new to them and frustration can set in very quickly if results are not achieved when trying to move forward in which then leads to quitting. Most people that try to come in don’t realize the metabolic damage they have plays a factor in their attempt to reach ketosis. So some different measures would have to be taken in order to move forward. Overweight and diabetics tend to be more sensitive with their carb tolerance but with this understanding there should not be any setbacks as long as the routine is approached accordingly. Some things to watch out for in such cases are things like “net carbs” or “low carb” food marketing claims. Reason I say this is because being sensitive with your tolerance level is an understatement when it comes to obtaining ketosis so the word “net” does not apply… all the carbs must be accounted for. The “low carb” claims you see in super markets are iffy simply because you have to pay close attention to Continue reading >>

Do You Really Have A Damaged Metabolism?

Do You Really Have A Damaged Metabolism?

The subject I am most frequently emailed about is metabolic damage, as I have written several posts on the topic (which you can find here). More and more people are starting to realise that the “magical” plan of 1200 calories a day combined with hours of cardio is damaging their bodies and metabolism. While this is positive in that it’s building awareness about the proper (i.e. healthy) way to exercise and eat, it is also causing many people who are in fact quite healthy to start convincing themselves that they too have metabolic damage. The most important thing to keep in mind is that you should not compare yourself to anyone. Sure, some of the points I will discuss below are not normal by any means, but on the other side of the coin you shouldn’t necessarily feel that you should be able to eat a huge amount of food every day just because I (or others) do. Every single factor in our lives – our genetic make-up, upbringing, activity levels throughout life, diet history and hormonal levels, just to name a few – has an impact on our metabolism. Even though I went through a prolonged period (5-6 years) of restrictive eating, I think the fact that I’ve always been a very active person helped in my favour when returning to full health. Even though I wasn’t eating much, my body learnt to survive on small amounts of food. When I finally started eating “normally”, it took my body about a year to work out what was happening. Some people won’t be so lucky. From what I’ve seen, the people who struggle to repair their metabolisms the most are those that come from largely sedentary backgrounds who suddenly thrust themselves into restrictive diet and exercise practices for prolonged periods of time. Their bodies enter a stage of complete shock, as they are not Continue reading >>

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