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Keto Metabolic Damage

Is It Possible To

Is It Possible To "screw Up" Your Metabolism?

Our brains, in relation to weight, are responding, adapting and planning "machines." Just for a single example, the brain of an anorexic has learned that it is STARVING - that food is very, very, very scarce and that it needs to absolutely maximize any "energy" (food) that it gets. Given that our brains/bodies are not separate, and "metabolism" is a whole-body process/event, this has profound implications.Just because in time the body/brain begins to be fed does not mean that it will just "snap to" and interpret this as the new "normal." It has learned, sometimes over many years that food is extremely scarce and when the next food/energy is coming is unpredictable and can take a loooooong, looooong time from last ingestion and even then will be in a scarcity amount. Thus, it responds accordingly. Even yo-yo dieting brings about huge changes. And that makes sense as well. Our brain is our "regulator." It learns with yo-yoing another version of the above. Who knows when the next time of scarcity with come... The implications are very real for those who have been substantially overweight, eating disordered, have a history of yo-yoing 10 lbs up and down, sometimes many, many times in their lives. One of my favorite pieces on this is Ned Koch's blog piece on compensatory adaptation...which doesn't just apply to eating...but to all behaviors and delves into the less than conscious mechanisms that are at work in response to even subtle signals in this adaptation process. What it boils down to for me, in "person-speak" is that we are constantly signaling and communicating with our bodies/brains and our bodies/brains in turn are continuously responding and adapting...for better or worse. We may not think or know we are "communicating," but we are. For me, Dr. Sharma is high, hig Continue reading >>

Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

Is A Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

I may receive a commission if you purchase something mentioned in this post. Full disclosure here. Ketogenic diets are all the rage right now, unless you’re reading this in 2027, in which case, ketogenic diets were all the rage in 2017. My clients and even friends are starting to ask me about “going keto,” because they’ve heard it will help them lose weight, improve athletic ability, boost brain power, and achieve overall unicorn health status. A quick search turns up multiple headlines claiming a ketogenic diet can reverse epilepsy, cancer, diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity and bring one to optimal health. So, is it all that? Is a ketogenic diet right for you, or is it just another fad? What is a Ketogenic Diet? A ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis. Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of dietary carbohydrates (usually below 50g/day), the liver becomes the sole provider of glucose to feed your hungry organs – especially the brain, a particularly greedy entity accounting for ~20% of total energy expenditure. (a great synopsis from Scientific American). Going keto basically means your body switches from burning glucose to fat for fuel. When you follow a ketogenic diet for a while, you enter into nutritional ketosis, which means your liver converts fats to ketones for fuel rather than than body burning glucose directly. A ketogenic diet excludes grains, starch, sugar, and fructose. It’s high fat, moderate protein, and very low in carbohydrates (quick lesson: anything that isn’t a protein or fat is a carb. That means Continue reading >>

Metabolic Damage And Keto Adaptation – Why And How.

Metabolic Damage And Keto Adaptation – Why And How.

I have been getting questions about how to keto adapt, and how long does keto adaption take etc. and does keeping calories up while keto dieting, does this reduce metabolic damage or adaptation even if your carbs are very low? So what this question is kind of centering on is the concept about metabolic damage and adaptation. My take is that your body becomes very efficient at burning calories when you drive your calories lower and lower and do more and more steady state cardio. I’m not talking about 1 or 2 – 45 min cardio sessions a week, I’m talking more about one or two hours of cardio per day. So this is a high amount of cardio and very low calories. Essentially what you’re doing is you’re just kind of metabolically shocking your system and your body responds by becoming a lot more efficient. Now these mechanisms of efficiency are starting to get studied in the scientific world but that’s basically kind of what we are talking about. Right now there isn’t much evidence, but they do believe something is there. The basis of these adaptations is definitely present. So how this does relate specifically to a ketogenic diet, and you know because your carbs are really low, can you still keep your calories high so you don’t get these metabolic adaptations. And the answer is yes. So what about ketosis? Let’s Get Scientific for a Moment This is a really important key to remember, ketosis is not weight loss, instead ketosis is actually a metabolic state when fat is being burned as your primary fuel source and then ketones are being produced. Ketones are by products of fat metabolism. Fat is getting oxidized at a very high rate, which results in ketone production and then you can measure ketones in either your urine (not recommended as I discuss here in my TOP K Continue reading >>

Keto And Metabolism, Part 1

Keto And Metabolism, Part 1

Metabolism is something about which I would venture the vast majority of people don’t really have any firm understanding. Yet it’s pretty key to understanding how we lose weight, which is kind of a big deal for most of the folks who’ve chosen a keto lifestyles. I’d like to spend the next couple of weeks discussing the various aspects of metabolism, and then connecting them to the different things we tend to recommend. One thing we here at Ketovangelist have discussed a bit- and a get a TON of pushback on- is calories and whether or not they’re really relevant to the discussion of weight loss, especially on keto. The key takeaway I’ve had from most of these discussions is that most folks don’t have the faintest idea what a calorie is anyway. To a lot of folks it’s some nebulous, magical part of our food that either gives us energy or makes us fat. And I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that the entirety of the weight loss community, regardless of what style of eating we’re talking about, is pretty obsessed with calories. So what the heck are they anyway? A calorie is a unit of measurement. That’s all. To be ultra precise, it’s the amount of heat it takes to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius. So it’s like an inch or a teaspoon, except instead of pulling out a ruler or a spoon to measure something tangible like a piece of paper or a bit of salt, you have to take the item into a lab and burn it to find out how much potential energy output it has. When it comes to food, we measure the energy it contains in kilocalories, which simply means that one kilocalorie is the same in potential energy output as one thousand calories. (I don’t even want to think about how much bacon they’ve burned to get that number o Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Introduction Numerous dietary components and supplements have been evaluated as possible cancer prevention agents; however, until recently few studies have investigated diet as a possible adjuvant to cancer treatment. One of the most prominent and universal metabolic alterations seen in cancer cells is an increase in the rate of glycolytic metabolism even in the presence of oxygen [1]. Although increased glucose uptake by tumor cells was thought to support increased cancer cell proliferation and energy demands, recent studies suggest that increased tumor cell glycolytic metabolism may represent an adaptive response to escape metabolic oxidative stress caused by altered mitochondrial oxygen metabolism [2–4]. These data support the hypothesis that cancer cells are reliant on increased glucose consumption to maintain redox homeostasis due to increased one electron reductions of O2 to form O2•− and H2O2 in mitochondria. This divergence from normal cell metabolism has sparked a growing interest in targeting mitochondrial oxygen metabolism as a means of selectively sensitizing cancer cells to therapy [5–17]. In this regard, dietary modifications, such as high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets that enhance mitochondrial oxidative metabolism while limiting glucose consumption could represent a safe, inexpensive, easily implementable, and effective approach to selectively enhance metabolic stress in cancer cells versus normal cells. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet consists of high fat, with moderate to low protein content, and very low carbohydrates, which forces the body to burn fat instead of glucose for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Generally, the ratio by weight is 3:1 or 4:1 fat to carbohydrate+protein, yielding a diet that has an energy dis Continue reading >>

The Truth About Metabolic Damage

The Truth About Metabolic Damage

Here's what you need to know... Struggling with lack of motivation, low libido, or just feel you've done all the right things but can no longer respond to diet and training? It could be metabolic damage. You can feel unwell and have metabolic dysfunction without being in an overt disease state. "Eat less and exercise more" can easily lead an advanced lifter into a state of metabolic damage. Your metabolism doesn't work like a calculator. It works like a thermostat. There are three ways to repair your metabolism, depending on what stage of starvation mode you're in. Starvation mode, metabolic damage, weight loss resistance, adrenal fatigue... For some reason, these terms get under people's skin. You hear constantly about this myth and that myth, and how these things are bogus. Sort of reminds me of a saying by Osho, my favorite philosopher: "The less a person knows the more stubbornly he knows it." They are not myths and there are plenty of people dealing with these issues. If you're one of those twenty-somethings with great energy and a perfect body and little real life experience, then you're probably ready to dismiss this article right off the bat. But just do me one favor: bookmark it. You may need it later. On the other hand, if you're someone who has struggled with lack of motivation, low libido, overtraining, illness, or feel you've done all the right things but can no longer respond to diet and training the same way, then this info is for you. Understanding the Terminology Honestly, I don't know where these terms came from. Like many things in health and fitness, there are phrases that get used somewhere and then become part of the lexicon. I'm an integrative physician. I, and many doctors like me, have been dealing with metabolic damage issues for years. Only we Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet - A Connection Between Mitochondria And Diet

Ketogenic Diet - A Connection Between Mitochondria And Diet

This article is written by Dr Gabriela Segura, Consultant Cardiologist, and published here with her permission. Mitochondria are an essential part of good cardiac function. Numbers in square brackets refer to references at the bottom of the article. Contents 1 Introduction 2 Mitochondrial Dysfunction 3 Ketosis – Closer Look 4 References 5 External links Ketosis is an often misunderstood subject. Its presence is thought to be equal to starvation or a warning sign of something going wrong in your metabolism. But nothing could be farther from the truth, except if you are an ill-treated type 1 diabetic person.[1] Ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. The entire body uses ketones in a more safe and effective way than the energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Our bodies will produce ketones if we eat a diet devoid of carbs or a low carb diet (less than 60 grams of carbs per day).[2] By eating a very low carb diet or no carbs at all (like a caveman) we become keto-adapted. In fact, what is known today as the ketogenic diet was the number one treatment for epilepsy until Big Pharma arrived with its dangerous cocktails of anti-epileptic drugs. It took several decades before we heard again about this diet, thanks in part to a parent who demanded it for his 20-month-old boy with severe seizures. The boy’s father had to find out about the ketogenic diet in a library as it was never mentioned as an option by his neurologist. After only 4 days on the diet, his seizures stopped and never returned.[3] The Charlie Foundation was born after the kid’s name and his successful recovery, but nowadays the ketogenic diet is available to th Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Metabolism Control

Ketosis For Metabolism Control

We know that simply counting calories doesn’t work for weight loss. The threadbare ideas of “calories in versus calories out” and “just eat less and exercise more” are outdated concepts, and not effective long-term. However we do know that the quality of your diet has a tremendous impact on your hormones, satiety, and body composition. In this article, we cover how ketosis for metabolic control wins out over other ways to try and lose fat. How Ketosis Changes Metabolism Let’s do a very quick overview of metabolism in the context of ketosis: When the average person eats, their body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose to be used as energy for all functions of the body. In this case, carbohydrates provide the main fuel source for the body. But when someone is in ketosis, either from eating a ketogenic diet or from fasting, their body is instead breaking down fats into ketone bodies for energy. These ketone bodies are then used to provide the body with a constant source of energy instead of carbs. Being in ketosis allows you to literally shift your metabolism. Now, let’s look at some of the powerful ways ketosis can be used for maintaining a healthy metabolism: Calorie Restriction Versus Ketosis As we prefaced above, simply reducing calories to lose weight is not effective. We know this based on research from people like Gary Taubes. And that’s just part of the story: it can actually be harmful to your metabolism and lower metabolic rate (the amount of calories the body burns per day) — just look at the long-term results from past winners of the Biggest Loser. After forcing the body into caloric reduction, the contestants’ metabolisms dropped, leading to weight loss plateaus and weight regain. In contrast, research has also shown that when we fast, th Continue reading >>

Do You Really Have A Damaged Metabolism?

Do You Really Have A Damaged Metabolism?

The subject I am most frequently emailed about is metabolic damage, as I have written several posts on the topic (which you can find here). More and more people are starting to realise that the “magical” plan of 1200 calories a day combined with hours of cardio is damaging their bodies and metabolism. While this is positive in that it’s building awareness about the proper (i.e. healthy) way to exercise and eat, it is also causing many people who are in fact quite healthy to start convincing themselves that they too have metabolic damage. The most important thing to keep in mind is that you should not compare yourself to anyone. Sure, some of the points I will discuss below are not normal by any means, but on the other side of the coin you shouldn’t necessarily feel that you should be able to eat a huge amount of food every day just because I (or others) do. Every single factor in our lives – our genetic make-up, upbringing, activity levels throughout life, diet history and hormonal levels, just to name a few – has an impact on our metabolism. Even though I went through a prolonged period (5-6 years) of restrictive eating, I think the fact that I’ve always been a very active person helped in my favour when returning to full health. Even though I wasn’t eating much, my body learnt to survive on small amounts of food. When I finally started eating “normally”, it took my body about a year to work out what was happening. Some people won’t be so lucky. From what I’ve seen, the people who struggle to repair their metabolisms the most are those that come from largely sedentary backgrounds who suddenly thrust themselves into restrictive diet and exercise practices for prolonged periods of time. Their bodies enter a stage of complete shock, as they are not Continue reading >>

Keto Talk (episode 26): Can Healthy Fats Make You Fat, Zero-carb Diets, And Healing A Damaged Metabolism With Keto

Keto Talk (episode 26): Can Healthy Fats Make You Fat, Zero-carb Diets, And Healing A Damaged Metabolism With Keto

KETO-FRIENDLY WINES FROM DRY FARM WINES NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorship If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles” who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam bring their A-game answering all of your questions in Episode 26! KEY QUOTE: “When the Small LDL-P on the CardioIQ drops below 500, you’re actually starting to reverse the progress of atherosclerosis.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 26: – Should I limit saturated fats on my keto diet if a genetic test shows it is necessary? I’ve followed a ketogenic lifestyle for 4 years now. My WellnessFX Cardio IQ blood test shows I have excessively high cholesterol (LDL-P 2478, Small LDL-P 498, triglycerides 98, HDL 76, hsCRP .02, Lp(a) 207, homocysteine 13.8, fibrinogen 175). Using my 23andme raw data, I discovered I’m not a good me Continue reading >>

Your Macros

Your Macros

Most people aim for a specific goal on a ketogenic diet. We aim to make sure the results of the calculator are accurate and can be used by anyone. Our keto calculator uses the Mifflin-St.Jeor Formula which was the most accurate (versus the Katch-McCardle Formula or the Harris-Benedict Formula) in a few studies. In this formula, the gender, height, weight, and age are needed to calculate the number of calories to consume. Our keto calculator uses body fat percentage to calculate your lean body mass. Using this number, we’re able to calculate how much protein you need to sufficiently lose weight without losing excess muscle. Eating too little or too much protein on a ketogenic diet (or any diet) can lead to dangerous or unwanted results. DEXA scans are proven to be the most accurate measurement of body fat. They’re commonly available at gyms and some doctor offices when requested. If you don’t have access to this, you can always go the old-fashioned route and use a good quality caliper. The last resort is using a guide to visually estimate – this can sometimes be a little bit inaccurate, so try to over estimate your body fat percentage. This will give us an idea of how much the minimum amount of calories your body will burn in a day. Our keto calculator uses this to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). We use this number, along with your body fat percentage, to estimate how many calories you’ll need for your goals. The BMR is simply a number of calories we burn while our bodies are at rest and from eating and digesting food. Together they form what’s known as TDEE, or total daily energy expenditure. This is the keto calculator’s estimate for your total calories burned per day. If you use a heart rate monitor or third party software to monitor your calo Continue reading >>

How To Fix Your Broken Metabolism By Doing The Exact Opposite

How To Fix Your Broken Metabolism By Doing The Exact Opposite

We saw last week with the Biggest Loser study that basal metabolism plummets when you lose weight with calorie reduction. As contestants lose weight, they burn a lot less energy – up to 800 calories per day less than before. Some of that is expected, since there is less body tissue to maintain, but nevertheless, these contestants burn far less than expected even taking this into account. Even 6 years later, their basal metabolic rate (BMR) remains depressed, as do the contestants themselves. The story got a lot of coverage, but one thing was consistently missing. How to fix it.That’s what I’ll show you today, and it’s the opposite of what most people expect. So, let’s think about this problem in the context of the 2 compartment model of obesity that we have used before. There are two compartments for body energy. We take calories in as food. This gets stored in the short term as glycogen, or long term as body fat. Glycogen is easily converted to energy (calories out), but body fat, not so much. So we can consider the analogous situation where short term energy is stored in a refrigerator and long term in the basement freezer. Insulin’s role is to direct food into the basement freezer. When there is excess food that can’t be kept in the fridge, insulin directs it to the freezer. This is body fat and manufactured in the liver by the process of de novo lipogenesis. What causes insulin levels to be elevated depends partly on the foods we eat, but also by insulin resistance. Fructose, for example, plays a key role in elevating insulin resistance which will, in turn raise insulin levels. Insulin resistance leads to high insulin levels, which leads to higher resistance in a vicious cycle. That is, it can be self sustaining. So during weight loss, if we don’t ad Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

The Lowdown On Keto Side Effects: What’s Real, What’s Not, And What’s Helpful, Written By Mark Sisson

The Lowdown On Keto Side Effects: What’s Real, What’s Not, And What’s Helpful, Written By Mark Sisson

With more people enthusiastic about the ketogenic diet comes more talk about potential adverse side effects. Upon closer examination, almost all of the complaints can be traced to a flawed approach. Granted, if you are coming to the game with significant metabolic damage from decades of carbohydrate dependency, or not paying attention to some common sense best practices, such as choosing healthy foods instead of blindly focusing on macros, you will likely struggle with something as stringent as keto. Let’s cover some of the common keto complaints being bantered about these days, examine what’s really going on, and discuss strategy for how to avoid any adverse side effects to going keto. Keto Flu The keto flu refers to feelings of general malaise and even immune disturbances in association with dietary modification. Commonly cited symptoms include feeling lethargic (especially in the afternoon), feeling hot, feeling achy in joints and muscles, among other related sensations. Here are eight important tips for avoiding the keto flu. Check out the full post for further details. Get sufficient omega-3s, from oily, cold water fish or supplementation. Consume an extra five grams (1 teaspoon) of sea salt or Himalayan pink salt per day when going keto. Consume foods rich in potassium and magnesium. Avocado is an excellent high fat, low carb source for both. Make an extra effort to hydrate strategically, especially around workouts. Consume more healthy, natural fats to replace the carbs you are cutting out. Consume MCT oil (from coconut oil or MCT oil supplements) to stimulate external ketone production. Move frequently and conduct cardio sessions at low heart rates. Try a gradual reduction in carbs if an abrubt reduction seems problematic or you experience keto flu symptoms. Continue reading >>

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