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Keto Meat Sweats

Six-month Update: My Very-low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Six-month Update: My Very-low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Back in August, I wrote about my decision to try lowering my carb intake in an attempt to improve my blood sugar levels. Already eating a low-carb diet (about 30 grams net carbs per meal) and at a healthy weight, I didn't know if following a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (VLCKD) would have an appreciable effect on my readings or how I'd feel at that level of restriction, but I felt compelled to try it. Well, after consistently consuming 30-45 grams of net carbs a day for six months, I have only positive things to say about my very-low-carb experience. Not only are my blood sugar readings exactly where they should be -- less than 90 fasting and less than 130 an hour after eating -- but I truly feel healthier, less stressed, and more balanced than ever. I'm hypothyroid, and although my T3 has declined in response to lower carb intake, I feel more energetic and not at all "hypo." Is it the stabilization of blood glucose or being in a mildly ketogenic state that's responsible for my renewed sense of well being? Perhaps a bit of both. There's some interesting research supporting the beneficial effects of ketones on brain health, including depression. I've mentioned several times that the reason I began following a VLCKD in the first place was strictly for blood sugar control. I didn't want or need to lose any weight, and as a diabetes educator, I wanted to try it out to see if I could get my own numbers under control this way. Limiting my carbs to less than 45 grams a day has been surprisingly easy. My diet consists of plenty of fat from avocados, nuts and nut butters, olive oil, cheese, butter, cream, and coconut oil; moderate amounts of fish, chicken, beef, Greek yogurt, and eggs; and at least one serving of nonstarchy vegetables at every meal and a small serving of Continue reading >>

The Complicated Science Of Why You Get The Meat Sweats

The Complicated Science Of Why You Get The Meat Sweats

You’re halfway through your third heaping helping of turkey dinner, and it hits you: the dreaded meat sweats. WTF is going on? It’s true that there isn’t a ton of actual science on the physiology of the meat sweats, which has led some to conclude that they are an old wives’ tale or a myth. But myths typically come from somewhere and professional eaters and anyone who’s chowed down a little too hard at a free barbecue will swear that the meat sweats are the real deal. The most persistent and sciencey-sounding explanation of the meat sweats is this: It is the result of thermogenesis, the internal production of heat that results from the work your body must do to digest the food you eat. Proteins are harder to digest than carbohydrates or fats, so a particularly protein-rich meal is going to warm you up more, potentially tipping you into the sweat zone. It makes sense on the surface, but it’s unlikely to be the whole story. Fats and carbs use up about 5-10 percent of their energy content compared with closer to 30 percent for protein. Let’s assume you have a meal in front of you that is two kilograms (4.4 pounds) of pure protein. Each gram of protein has four calories, so you’re looking at an 8,000 calorie meal. Your body burns 30 percent of that, or 2,400 calories, in digestion. One calorie is defined as the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius. Spread those 2,400 calories out over the body of a 90-kilogram (198-pound) man, who is mostly made of water, and you get a temperature rise of just 0.03 degrees Celsius, or 0.05 degrees Fahrenheit. So yes, eating a whole load of meat will warm you up, but only slightly. So what makes guys who cram hot dogs down their throats erupt with moisture? The answer is Continue reading >>

Can A Low-carb, No-sugar Diet Cause Night Sweats & Sleepiness?

Can A Low-carb, No-sugar Diet Cause Night Sweats & Sleepiness?

Reducing your carbohydrates allows you to enter the dietary state of ketosis, where you primarily burn fat for energy instead of sugar. This requires you to severely limit your carbohydrate intake and avoid all sugars. Diets of this sort present certain difficulties, including a lack of energy if you typically run on a high-carbohydrate diet. Consult a health care professional before beginning any diet or exercise program. Video of the Day Low-carbohydrate dieting limits your body's ability to use glycogen for energy. The more you restrict your carbohydrates, and the more you are physically active, the quicker you will experience a loss of energy. Over time, your body becomes more accustomed to running primarily on ketones, free-floating fatty acids, instead of sugar, but it takes a while to adapt to this. If you are following the Atkins diet or a similar variation, this is usually dealt with during a two-week period known as the induction phase. Sleepiness can be the direct result of a lack of energy. Even though you are dieting, if you cut your calories too far, you may be suffering from a lack of total energy to work with. Regardless of the type of diet, excessive caloric restriction can result in both sleeplessness and sleepiness. Until you become accustomed to running on ketones, you may experience sleepiness or euphoria, a dazed feeling, as your body becomes accustomed to having less sugar and more fat to run on. You may sweat more on a low-carbohydrate diet for more than one reason. As your glycogen, or sugar levels deplete, you lose your ability to store water. Each gram of stored glycogen retains 4 g of water. As you must consume as much or more water while dieting than you did before you started your diet, you are going to expel water quickly, and some of this Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List

Ketogenic Diet Food List

For some people starting a ketogenic diet may be one of hardest things to do, eating a healthy diet is not always easy in this world where highly processed and unhealthy food is so easily accessible. Changing your unhealthy eating habits can be hard. We’ve put together this ketogenic diet food list to help you make decisions on what to shop for and figure out what foods to eat. The list is by no means exhausted but will contribute to gain a better understanding of a LCHF low carb high fat diet. Anyone can eat a low carb diet, but the goal is to eat natural, healthful and real food, not just any low carb foods and ultimately adopt a healthier lifestyle. What To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet? A keto diet is pretty simple really; it’s mainly consuming very little amounts of carbohydrates, eating lots of fats and moderate amounts of protein. If you want more keto information, then be sure to check out our many articles. To get yourself into ketosis and burn ketones for fuel total carbs will vary for everyone. If you are highly active and participate in weightlifting, sports, use a gym, high-intensity exercises or running then you can increase total net carbohydrates for the day up to 100g per day. Otherwise under 50g carbs for the day for most people is sufficient. To stay in ketosis protein amounts should be moderate and averaging about 0.5g to a maximum 1g of protein per pound of body weight. This should be split into smaller amounts for the day. For example, if you weigh 150 lbs. its 150×0.5 = 75 and 150×1 =150 so between 75g and 150g of protein spread throughout the day. Remember the main focus of a ketogenic diet is eating fats, and so you could be eating a lot more than you are used to after trimming down the carbs and the proteins. Ketogenic Diet Food List Fats and O Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #009: Unlocking Self-mastery

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #009: Unlocking Self-mastery

Interview with Rebecca Skeele, chatting about how to end toxic thoughts, feel acceptance toward yourself, and see how damn amazing you REALLY are. For podcast transcript, scroll down. SHOW NOTES + LINKS Subscribe on iTunes or your favorite podcast app More from Rebecca Skeele Watch future self-meditation video TIMESTAMPS Steps to ending blame and shame (27:47) What’s holding you back (41:23) Steps to connect to your body (50:13) PARTNERS OF THE KETO DIET PODCAST Get the nourishment your body deserves and try Vital Proteins collagen protein, gelatin or liver capsules today. Stock up on your favorite high-quality, nutrient-dense real-food products from Primal Kitchen! Use the coupon code FAT for 15% off your entire order. intelliBED encourages rest, healing and recovery for balanced hormones. Get your toxin-free mattress with the intelliBED coupon code HEALTHFUL for 10% off and a free Blendtec blender. TRANSCRIPT FOR THIS EPISODE Leanne Vogel: You’re listening to episode number 9 of The Keto Diet podcast. Hey, I’m Leanne from healthfulpursuit.com and this is The Keto Diet podcast where we’re busting through the restrictive mentality of a traditional ketogenic diet to uncover the life you crave. What’s keto? Keto is a low-carb, high-fat diet where we’re switching from a sugar burning state to becoming fat burning machines. The Keto Diet has helped me with fertility, has ended my constant weight struggles, blood sugar irregularities, imbalanced moods and so, so much more. I want to share this magic with you using a realistic approach to this powerful diet. No restriction, new ways of looking at things and positive support awaits. Let’s get this party started. Hey, I’m Leanne from healthfulpursuit.com and this is The Keto Diet podcast where we’re busting th Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Menopause can be very difficult on a number of levels. Although each woman's experience is different, many find that they gain fat, lose muscle tone, and struggle with hot flashes, insomnia, and mood swings during this time. In this article, I'll discuss how a low-carb or keto diet combined with other lifestyle strategies may help you manage some of the physical, mental, and emotional symptoms of menopause. What is the Menopause Transition? Although a woman technically reaches menopause when she has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, symptoms related to perimenopause – the time where hormonal changes begin - can start much earlier. In addition, they may last for several years after this point, and new symptoms may develop within the first few years after menopause. The average age of onset for perimenopause is 46, and it typically lasts about 7 years. However, a woman may start perimenopause anytime between her mid-30s and mid-50s, and the transition can last from 4 to 14 years (1). The day after a woman has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, she is considered postmenopausal. During and after the menopause transition, as many as 34 symptoms may occur. The most common ones include: Hot flashes and night sweats Weight gain, especially around the middle Insomnia Vaginal dryness Mood swings Fatigue Poor memory, ie, “brain fog” Interestingly, while some women find that their symptoms are more severe during perimenopause, others report that their symptoms intensify after they are postmenopausal. Hormone Fluctuations and Insulin Resistance During Menopause During a woman's reproductive years, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes the release of an egg from one of her ovaries approximately every 28 days and stimulates ovarian production of estrogen. Af Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

More Than You Ever Wanted To Know About Protein & Gluconeogenesis

More Than You Ever Wanted To Know About Protein & Gluconeogenesis

My dear readers, the website/blog update has run into some snags. Rather than continuing to keep you waiting, though, I’m going to publish new posts and I’ll worry about transitioning them over later on. And since it’s been a few months since I last posted anything of substance, I’ve decided to drop this enormous, enormous post on you to make up for that lost time—and it might take you equally long to read it. Sorry about that, but hey, I haven’t written anything meaningful since May, so, depending on your point of view, this post is either a gift or a punishment. As I’ve said in the past, if you’re an insomniac or a cubicle dweller with lots of time to kill, you’re welcome. (The rest of you, go get yourself a cup of coffee or tea, come back, and get comfy.) I’ve been meaning to write this post for over a year, but it’s such a big topic and so much can go wrong that the thought of tackling it all was enough to make me not write it. But it’s gotten to the point that I’m tired enough of seeing the same questions asked and the same myths propagated over and over on various keto and low carb forums that I’ve decided this needs to be done, no matter how painful I might find it. Because seeing nonsense and fearmongering regarding the role of protein in low carb or ketogenic diets is even more painful. So if finally managing to organize my thoughts into some kind of coherent prose means I never have to read the phrase, “too much protein turns into sugar” ever again, it will be worth it. So that’s what’s on tap today, kids: Gluconeogenesis. That’s right, friends, it’s time to do some myth-busting surrounding the whacked-out notion that protein—lean protein, in particular (like a skinless chicken breast, or tuna canned in water)—is the Continue reading >>

Crohn's Disease Successfully Treated With The Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet

Crohn's Disease Successfully Treated With The Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet

Crohn's disease, an inflammatory disease of the bowel, is regarded as having no cure [1]. Standard treatment which involves steroids, immunosuppressants and biological therapy is aimed at reducing symptoms [1]. Periods of flares and remissions typically alternate, however, the overall course of the disease is progressive. A set of ecological evidence, including a discrepancy between westernized and non-westernized countries in the occurrence of the disease, raises the possibility of lifestyle and/or dietary factors in the etiology of the disease [2]. There have been several attempts to use a dietary intervention in Crohn's disease such as the specific carbohydrate diet [3] and the anti-inflammatory diet [4] as well as elimination-reintroduction diets [5] . Although clinical improvements and reduction of medicines have been reported being associated with these diets we are not aware of any diet inducing complete remission and long-term freedom of medicines at the same time. The authors of the present report are using a diet referred to as the paleolithic ketogenic diet in the treatment of chronic conditions. So far we have published cases of successful treatment of diabetes type 1 [6] [7] and type 2 [8], epilepsy [9] [10] as well as other conditions [11]. Diagnosis The 14-year-old boy presented with fatigue, low grade fever, iron deficiency anemia, lower abdominal tenderness and perianal dermatitis. He was of short stature for his age. On 30 September 2013 upper and lower endoscopy was performed. The latter showed ulcerative lesion in the terminal ileum. Biopsy was taken from multiple sites and histopathology showed severe inflammation of the terminal ileum and the Bauhin's valve. Signs of mild-to-moderate degree aspecific inflammation were seen in the colon. On laborato Continue reading >>

Ammonia Smell During Exercise On Ketogenic Diet – Q&a

Ammonia Smell During Exercise On Ketogenic Diet – Q&a

Question: My question relates to the pungent smell of ammonia in my sweat during a hard work out, seems to start about 45 minutes in and gets stronger from then. This started very soon after the diet. I have recently started a high protein slow carb diet,am drinking between 3 and 4 litres of water a day (currently 180lbs with 21% body fat)have plenty of energy and feel alert and well. From your work I gather this could be the result of ketosis and burning protein and fat for energy? Two questions please: 1. Is this OK? 2. Is there anyway to eliminate the smell? Answer: This is a fairly common report on very low-carbohydrate/ketogenic diet (defined, once again, as any diet containing less than 100 grams of carbohydrate per day), a report of a fairly strong ammonia smell in the sweat during exercise. As I discuss in detail in my first book The Ketogenic Diet this ammonia is produced due to the ultimate breakdown of ATP to ADP to AMP and ammonia. This appears to occur more readily when muscle glycogen is depleted (as occurs with the combination of of a very low-carbohydrate intake along with training) and may be part of the increased protein requirements that have been known to occur with endurance training (this is discussed in detail in The Protein Book). I would mention that it appears that this ‘protein breakdown’ is not actually coming from the breakdown of skeletal muscle itself; rather it’s from the breakdown of BCAA (branched-chain amino acids) within the free amino acid pool. So is this ok? So long as dietary protein intake is sufficient, I don’t see this as being any real problem. The effect is slight in terms of the absolute amount of protein being broken down (in terms of grams) and so long as protein intake is sufficient, there shouldn’t be any detri Continue reading >>

What Is A Keto Vegan/plant-based Diet?

What Is A Keto Vegan/plant-based Diet?

Disclaimer: I am not a Dr. nor do I play one on the internet. Always consult with your doctor before experimenting with your diet (seriously, see a functional medicine Dr. and get data from blood tests, urine tests, etc.). Please feel free to comment if you’re aware of anything that should be updated; I always appreciate knowing the science and I’ll update the content promptly. My goal is to help readers get more scientifically educated and improve their health and their lives with as much joy as possible. The purpose of this blog is to educate you on a Keto Vegan Plant-Based Diet. What Is Ketosis? Definition: “Ketogenesis” means “generating ketones,” which your body does naturally to generate energy from fat when carbohydrate sources are sufficiently low (e.g., after intense exercise, long periods of fasting, etc.). “Ketogenic diets” are thus a way of switching your body over into a fat-burning state. The Ketogenic or KETO diet is gaining popularity. Many people wonder if it is possible to adopt a Keto Vegan Plant-Based Diet. I’m here to tell you YES! It is! What Is A Ketogenic (KETO) Diet? When we increase our healthy fats and lower our carbohydrates (grains, most fruit, sweeteners, and starchy vegetables) and add in a moderate amount of protein (15 grams per meal), the human brain becomes more efficient. We have more mental cognition, clarity, we lose weight, and have a more balanced energy level. I’ve been practicing a Keto Vegan Plant-Based Diet without knowing it for 20 years. I started eating this way when I found out I had systemic candida. I was then introduced into the world of cleansing. My candida remedy was to eliminate most carbohydrates and adopt a vegan, high fat, low carb diet. It was successful! I have experimented with this way of Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet (or keto diet) has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvement. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) for energy to dietary fat and, critically, your own body fat after the stage of “ketosis” is reached. Meanwhile, beyond its outstanding potential to help people lose weight and burn off fat stores, research shows that the ketogenic diet helps to fight serious diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer’s. Table of Contents 1. What Is the Keto Diet? What Is Ketosis? How to Get Into Ketosis What Are the Stages of Ketosis? Does the Keto Diet Work for Women? 2. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet 3. What Is the Ketogenic Diet Plan? 5. Keto Side Effects and the Keto Flu What Is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet plan that was originally designed in the 1920s for patients with epilepsy by researchers working at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. (1) Researchers found that fasting — avoiding consumption of all foods for a brief period of time, including those that provide carbohydrates — helped reduce the amount of seizures patients suffered, in addition to having other positive effects on body fat, blood sugar, cholesterol and hunger levels. (4) Unfortunately, long-term fasting is not a feasible op Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

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