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Keto Macros Percentage

With What Diet Can I Lose A Lot Of Weight Fast?

With What Diet Can I Lose A Lot Of Weight Fast?

Look, almost any diet will make you lose weight. But what are you going to do when you’re finished with them? If you’re like most people, you’ll fall back on your old habits—the same ones that made you fat in the first place. That’s why most diets end in failure. It’s not that they’re ineffective—although some are complete rubbish; it’s that they’re a temporary answer to a semi-permanent problem. Here’s what you need to find out: what’s the healthiest form of food consumption you can enjoy for the rest of your life? Maybe you like veganism? Or paleo, or keto, or whatever. Perhaps you don’t end up in any diet camp and instead create your own habits. That’s great too. But here’s what matters for right now: if you want to lose weight, then you must consume food at a caloric deficit. This means eating less calories than you burn. I lost eighty pounds a number of years ago. About fifty to sixty pounds of that came without any exercise; I simply ate at a caloric deficit and tracked everything on MyFitnessPal—an online food journal with a mobile app. Similar stories can be found daily on forums like Reddit’s /r/loseit. You can literally achieve this eating junk food. (although I don’t recommend it!) A professor at Kansas State University lost 27lbs in 2 months eating Twinkies, chips, Oreos, and other junk. More recently, I lost 6lbs after eating exclusively at gas stations for 30 days. I traveled across 9 states and visited more than 200 stores—all in an effort to prove that you can “eat out” and still be healthy. But to be fair, the convenience store industry is working hard to make healthful food available on-the-go. Finding fruit, veggies, and good made-to-order options was easier than I thought it would be. So here’s the point: d Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Brief Overview A ketogenic diet is a way of eating that promotes a state of ketosis in the body. Generally speaking a ketogenic diet will have the following macronutrient ratios: High Fat – 60%-80% of total calories come from fat. Moderate Protein – 15%-35% of total calories come from protein. Low Carbohydrate – 5% or less of total calories come from carbohydrates. Everyone’s macronutrient breakdown will be different and depends on a variety of factors. Reference our Keto Macro Calculator to figure out what yours are! Eating in accordance with these macronutrient ratio’s will deplete your body of glucose and force it to start producing ketones. Your body will then use these ketones for energy. What is Ketosis From Wikipedia: Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the energy. With the abundance of high carbohydrate foods available in modern times, virtually all human beings that don’t make a concerted effort to restrict carbs are always in a state of glycolysis. There are a number of reasons why ketosis is beneficial when compared to glycolysis, which we will get into later. What are Ketones? Ketones are the fuel source your body is running on when it’s in a state of ketosis. They are produced in the liver when glycogen is depleted and are characterized as a slower burning fuel source when compared to glucose. Insulin and Keto This is where the magic happens. Eating a high carb diet means you’re always producing insulin to transport the glucose around your body. The fat can just sit around and watch because insulin is doing all the work. The fat is eventually stored, which leads to weight gain. In a Continue reading >>

Keto Macros: How To Calculate Your Optimal Ketogenic Macronutrients

Keto Macros: How To Calculate Your Optimal Ketogenic Macronutrients

Following a keto diet means paying attention to your macros so you stay in ketosis. While you can find a few online calculators for this, it’s more than possible to calculate your optimal ketogenic macronutrients without one. This article will break down, step by step, how you can determine your own personal needs regarding calories and macros on a ketogenic diet. Here are the things we’ll calculate: #1 Your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) This is the number of calories your body needs just to support its vital functions (without taking into account extra energy needed for things like exercise). This is important because the more of you there is, the more energy (calories) you need to support daily processes. While it’s tough to get an EXACT calculation of basal metabolic rate, we can get really close by using the Harris-Benedict equation below. (If you’re in an area that uses metric, the Mifflin-St. Jeor equation will be easiest for you.) BMR for men = 66 + (6.2 x Weight in pounds) + (12.7 x Height in inches) – (6.76 x Age) BMR for women = 655.1 + (4.35 x Weight in pounds) + (4.7 x Height in inches) – (4.7 x Age) Let’s break each of these down a little more. Calculating Height and Weight Measure your weight in pounds. This step is easy. Calculate your height in inches. Multiple the feet by 12, then add the additional inches. For example, someone 5’ 8” would be a total of 68 inches tall. Your Age Since muscle mass gradually declines as we go past age 30, BMR decreases over time as well. That’s why age is factored into this equation. Your Gender Since body composition is typically a little different between men and women, gender factors into the equation. So, again, use these equations to get your basal metabolic rate: BMR for men = 66 + (6.2 x Weight) + ( Continue reading >>

Find Your Keto Macros

Find Your Keto Macros

Fine tune your fat-burning with the perfect keto ratio. Learn the special concerns for protein and fat ratios, how to track your keto macros and where to find the wiggle room. Best keto ratio for rapid fat-burning Printable keto food pyramid Online keto calculator Printable list of keto macros: calories, fat, net carbs, protein Keto macro is short for ketosis macro-nutrient. The three keto macro-nutrients are fats, proteins and carbs. Sometimes, calories are also considered part of the equation. What’s the best keto ratio? “Best” depends on your goals. A typical keto ratio has 75% of calories from fat, 20% of calories from protein and 5% of calories from fiber-rich carbs. A Typical Keto Ratio Keto Tip: A perfect ketogenic ratio happens when the amount of protein grams are equal to or slightly great than the grams of fat. Keto Food Pyramid Keto foods center around healthy fats, with moderate amounts of protein and scant carbs. During ketosis, think of fat as a food group. The Atkins Keto Food Pyramid illustrates which of the 200 ketosis foods to enjoy liberally and which ones to limit. Click the image to view, print or save. Tracking Keto Macros Track keto macros helps identify diet stalls and plateau. Macro tracking pinpoints troublesome keto ratios in your diet. For example: Are you eating enough fat? Are you eating too much protein? Track your keto foods and find out. Keto Wiggle Room If your keto ratio is off a bit, it’s not a big deal. You have wiggle room. If some days are over and some days are under your ideal goals, it’s fine. Keep your calories in check and track your keto macros by averaging several days at a time. A single day won’t make or break your plan. Testing for Ketosis Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are u Continue reading >>

Is It Okay To Drink Milk During Keto Diet?

Is It Okay To Drink Milk During Keto Diet?

While true that milk is relatively high in carbs, excluding altogether isn't necessary. obviously carbs are highly restricted under a keto diet, but if you like a little milk in your coffee or tea you're not going to blow your daily carb limit as long as you're careful. If you are following a keto diet, just know what your daily net carb limit is in terms of grams, following the 75/20/5 keto ratio. And to come up with that number you start by finding your daily calorie goal—slightly fewer calories than what’s needed to sustain your current weight at your current activity level. Then, multiply that total calories number by the percentage for each macro. You then divide each of those numbers by the calories per gram below: Fat = 9 calories per gram Protein = 4 calories per gram Carbs = 4 calories per gram So, if your daily calorie limit is 2500, your net carb target would be 31 grams, and if your calorie limit is 2000, your net car limit would be 25 grams. So just know what your daily net carb limit is and then make reasonable choices to stay under it without giving up the carb-containing foods you most enjoy. For more information on following a keto diet including foods ranked by their net carb content in each category and complete 4-week meal plans visit Keto Diet Plan Explained, Best Ketogenic Diet Foods & Ketosis Diet Menu Continue reading >>

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What are macros? If you’ve been reading up on the keto diet, you may have stumbled across the term “macros” and wondered what all the fuss is about. It’s thrown around everywhere by well meaning ketoers giving advice to newbies: “If it fits your macros”, “track those macros”, “your macros may be off”, ad nauseum. I’m guilty of it myself. But to someone trying to get started, this can be completely mind-boggling. A quick Google search doesn’t even really help. Is this an advanced function in an Excel worksheet? A fancy camera lense? What in the hell are people talking about? Exactly what are macros? Let me clarify. The term “macros” is short for MACRONUTRIENTS in the context of nutrition and the keto diet. Macronutrients are the energy-giving components of food that fuels our body. They include carbohydrates, protein, and fat; this is where your dietary calories come from. Grasping the concept of macros is important for the keto diet because you need to find the right balance of carbs, protein, and fats to get into ketosis, stay in ketosis, and turn your body into a fat burning machine. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the only macronutrient that is not essential for survival. There are essential fatty acids and amino acids (the building blocks of fats and proteins), but there is no such thing as “essential carbohydrates”. Carbs are made up of sugars and starches. In order to successfully reach ketosis, you will need to limit your carbohydrate intake. Fiber is also considered a carb, but it doesn’t count towards your total carb tally. The reason for this is that we can’t really digest fiber so it has a minimal impact on your blood sugar. So, what does this mean for you? When you are looking at a nutrition label, look at the line that sa Continue reading >>

Do I Have To Stay At 20g Of Carbs A Day To Lose Weight And Enter Ketosis?

Do I Have To Stay At 20g Of Carbs A Day To Lose Weight And Enter Ketosis?

While in ketosis, your body effectively uses fat for fuel. In general, the daily intake of net carbs required to enter ketosis could vary from 20 to 100 grams per day (and very rarely over 100 grams per day). Most people, who have experienced ketosis, claim to have reached that state at about 20-50 grams of net carbs per day. I'd suggest you start at 20-30 grams and see how you can adjust it for your needs. There are two ways to find your ideal net carbs intake: Low to high method Start from a low level of net carbs to ensure you quickly enter ketosis (~ 20 grams of net carbs per day). When you detect ketosis after about 2-3 days, start adding net carbs (about 5 grams each week) until you detect a very low-level or no ketones (using Ketostix or blood ketone meter). This is usually the most reliable and quickest way to discover your net carbs limit. It could be a bit hard the first couple of days, as you have to give up almost all carbs from one day to another but it will be worth it. This method is highly recommended. High to low method Assuming you're not in ketosis, start from a relatively high level of net carbs (~ 50 grams) and keep reducing (about 5 grams each week) until you detect presence of ketones. This is a less difficult approach but not recommended, as you may spend a long time out of ketosis before you find you net carbs limit. If you can't see any ketones, be patient. It typically takes 2-3 days for your body to deplete glycogen stores, so don't expect to be in ketosis after just a day of low-carb. Remember, ketosis is a favourable condition and an indication that your body uses fat for fuel but you can lose weight even without being in ketosis. Diet high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates is naturally sating, making you less hungry and, Continue reading >>

Will My Body Burn Fat If I'm Eating 20g Of Carbs A Day, Or Do I Need To Be In Ketosis?

Will My Body Burn Fat If I'm Eating 20g Of Carbs A Day, Or Do I Need To Be In Ketosis?

Your body can and will burn fat regardless of whether you're in a state of nutritional ketosis, as long as you are consistently burning more calories than you are taking in. But if fat loss is your goal, a keto diet will likely get you where you want to go more quickly than any other diet/nutrition plan. Most people will enter the state of nutritional ketosis if they are consistently consuming 20g of net carbs per day. But you don't want to guess at what that that carb number is for you. And you don't have to. The carb limit for getting into a state of nutritional ketosis and staying there depends on your total daily calories, which is based on your age, weight, activity level, sex and weight loss goal, which you can quickly calculate here. From there it’s all about calculating the actual number of grams you need to take in for fat, protein, and carbs following the 75/20/5 keto ratio. And to come up with those number you simply multiply your total daily calorie goal by the percentage for each macro. You then divide each of those numbers by the calories per gram below: Fat = 9 calories per gram Protein = 4 calories per gram Carbs = 4 calories per gram Here's an example of how those macros would break down for the average male and female: Keep in mind that the carb number means net carbs. So when you're reading food labels be sure to subtract the grams of fiber from the grams of total carbs for your net carb number. For more information on following a keto diet, including free 4-week meal plans, visit Keto Diet Plan Explained, Best Ketogenic Diet Foods & Ketosis Diet Menu Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator

Keto Calculator

Our Ketogenic Calculator is based on the Ketogenic Ratio Formula (K/AK, Ketogenic/Anti-Ketogenic), which was originally used for epilepsy patients. The formula gives you the potential ketone ratio of any meal, depending on the macronutrients of the meal. To keep yourself in a state of ketosis, you need to have a ketogenic ratio value of more than 1.5. How To Use The Keto Calculator Almost all other keto calculators are nothing more than low carb calculators. They don’t meet the K/AK equation, as these calculators are not designed for the anti- ketogenic nature of proteins. Keto Ratio Description Less than 1.5 – not a healthy balance. The body will not register ketones 1.5 To 1.6 – Mildly ketogenic where ketones will likely be registered 1.6 To 2.0 – A good state of ketosis where most people will register ketones More than 2.0 - Very ketogenic! Almost everyone will see ketones Why Do We Say This is the BEST and Most ACCURATE Calculator? As we mentioned above, other calculators do not take into account the anti-ketosis ratio of protein. They simply list the entire protein amount as being ketosis friendly, which isn’t true. Our calculator will help you set up an appropriate and safe calorie deficit. By setting a safe amount of protein intake, you will keep your lean muscle and lose only unwanted fat. Our calculator determines your macro NEEDS based on your unique specifications, not simply some generic percentages. When you keep carbs low you will lose weight. Eating enough protein will ensure that you lose only fat, while eating plenty of fat prevents you from feeling hungry and keeps you feeling satisfied with your food. Ketogenic/Anti-Ketogenic Nature Of Macronutrients In case you are new to the keto diet plan, some foods are rather ketogenic, others are not. Continue reading >>

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 171 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1534 kcal 5 % 18 % 77 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 144 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1294 kcal 6 % 21 % 73 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 117 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1054 kcal 7 % 24 % 69 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 91 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 814 kcal 8 % 29 % 63 % We have open-sourced KetoDiet Buddy, you can now find it on Github. What is the Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. The exact amount of fat and protein is a matter of individual body responses and activity levels. However, most people on ketogenic diets don't consume over 5% of calories from carbohydrates. In most cases, you won’t need to count calories on a ketogenic diet. However, if you find it hard to lose weight or you are relatively fit and trying to lose a small amount of fat, you may also have to count calories. If you just started following a low-carb diet, don't forget to read my free Guide to Keto & Paleo Diet which includes a print-friendly PDF version! You will find all the information you need, including the keto food list and tips on how to follow the diet to achieve your goals. Maintenance Level Maintenance Level, also known as Total Energy Expenditure, is a level at which you maintain a stable bodyweight. According to Lyle McDonald: Maintenance Level = BMR + TEA + TEF where: BMR is the Basal Metabolic Rate, TEA is the Thermal Effect of Activity and TEF is the Thermal Effect of Feeding Basal Metabolic Rate is the amount of energy expended daily at rest. BMR Continue reading >>

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

When on the ketogenic diet, one of the most important things you’ll have to pay attention to is your macronutrient breakdown. This means you’ll be getting a certain portion of your calories form carbohydrates (a very small portion) at 5%, a larger portion of calories from protein (35%), and the largest number of calories from fats (65%). There are many online sites that can help you figure out how many calories you need on a daily basis, based on your height, weight, measurements, age, gender and level of activity. From there, you can also use online calculators to help you figure out the proper breakdown, in grams, for each macronutrient percentage you’ll be eating. You’ll multiply your total daily calories by each percentage to get the grams of each macronutrient that you’ll need. For example, if you need 1200 calories per day, and your carbohydrates are 5% of that total, then multiply 1200 by 5% to get the number of grams of carbohydrates you’ll be allowed to eat each day. In this case, 5% of 1200 calories is 60 calories. You then divide the calories by the grams per unit of carb, protein or fat. Carbohydrates and proteins both have 4 calories per gram and fats have 9 calories per gram. Again, in this example, 60 calories divided by 4 grams per carb leaves you with a total of 15 grams of carbs per day. There are several great phone apps that will do the calculations for you. My personal favorite is Carb Counter. This also makes restaurant eating a breeze. One last note on food and nutrient tracking applications—you can typically also use these to plan your meals ahead of time. Just plug in the proposed foods for the day to see where your calorie and macronutrient values will lie, and make adjustments from there. Then, you build your meals around those n Continue reading >>

I Have Developed Cellulite On A Ketogenic Diet. How Is It Possible To Gain Fat On This Diet?

I Have Developed Cellulite On A Ketogenic Diet. How Is It Possible To Gain Fat On This Diet?

This is a really good question - I would be frustrated too in your situation. I think there are several factors that may be playing in to the response your body is having: First, you mention you’re eating less than 20 net carbs per day (which is great!), but you don’t mention your other macros - protein and fat. Remember, Keto is a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet with daily targets for all three of these macronutrients. If you’re only counting your carbs, your other macros may be totally out of whack, which could explain why you’ve gained fat. On keto, you’ll find that some people focus on percentages for each of the three macros I’ve listed above (65%-75% fat, 20%-30% protein, and 5%-10% carbs), but I think it’s much easier to calculate exactly how much of each you should be eating each day by counting grams rather than trying to calculate percentages all day. So on keto, the recommended starting point for most people in grams for each of the macros is 20 net grams of carbs, 50–75 grams of protein for women/100–125 grams of protein for men, and at least a 1:1 up to a 1:2 ratio of protein to fat for everyone. But as I said, these numbers are simply starting points. Everyone is different and their bodies will react differently to any dietary change, so these numbers are not set in stone. I recommend trying to hit these targets when you first start keto and then adjusting them if necessary once you’ve been on the diet for a while to achieve maximum benefits. So make sure you’re tracking all three macros. If you haven’t been doing that, try starting to track and see what happens. If you have been tracking all three, ask yourself if you have been hitting the targets I suggested. One thing that can be a problem is getting too much protei Continue reading >>

Perfect Keto Macronutrient Calculator

Perfect Keto Macronutrient Calculator

Your Keto Macronutrients Explained Using a macronutrient calculator is a great way to estimate how to eat in order to, Let’s recall that for the classical ketogenic diet, our food intake will be, With this distribution, a person eating 2,500 calories per day will eat: Carbohydrate Intake For most people, a range of 20-50 grams of carbohydrate intake per day is ideal for the keto diet. Some people can go as high as 80 grams per day to stay in ketosis, but the majority should stay in the 20-50g range for best results. Each person’s metabolism is different. Protein Intake Protein should be kept to adequate proportions. Eating too much protein is undesirable because our bodies have a metabolic process named gluconeogenesis which converts excess protein into glycogen and keeps you in glucose burning-mode (i.e. not in ketosis). The word gluconeogenesis has three parts to it, To prevent gluconeogenesis, avoid eating more than 1.5 to 2g of protein per kg of lean body mass (0.68 – 1g of protein per lb. of lean body mass). Fat Intake The remaining 70-80% of your calories come from fats. Since fat is the main source of nutrition on a ketogenic diet, it’s important to source high-quality, healthy fats. Using Your Results Now that we know how to eat for ketosis, it’s time to put the information to good use and help us towards our goals. Many people use keto for one or more of the following benefits: Using Ketosis for Medical Conditions Preparing For Success As the saying goes, “failing to prepare is preparing to fail.” The way to set ourselves up for success is to source great foods to nourish our body and get into ketosis. This means our grocery list and pantries will look quite different. Common foods on the ketogenic diet include, Meats: fatty cuts of grass-fed beef Continue reading >>

Macro Calculator

Macro Calculator

Body Composition Set your current weight, in pounds or kilograms, and your bodyfat percentage. (How to visually estimate bodyfat %) Activity Level (not counting exercise): Set your usual activity level. This does not include additional exercise like gym, running, etc. If not known, choose Sedentary. Choose "Custom" to set your TDEE manually. Multipliers for activities are taken from Chapter 8 of "Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism, 5th Edition" Daily Calories Set your goal to get your recommended calorie intake. If you used the Exercise Info section above, then you can compare calories for those days that you exercise and those that you don't. It is not recommended to go over 25% deficit for fat loss or over 15% surplus for muscle gain. Daily Exercise Info If needed, set your exercise information for those days that you will be exercising. (Click here for Kcal / min calculations). This will allow you to compare calorie limits on those days that you exercise against those that you don't. Activity Minutes Kcal burned / min Total Kcal burned Weights Cardio Other Daily Macros Adjust your protein ratio: To maintain muscle, leave protein ratio between 0.69 to 0.8. It is not recommended to drop below 0.69 or muscle loss may occur. To gain muscle, the protein ratio should be between 0.8 to 1.2. There is normally no advantage to consuming more than 0.82g/lb (1.8g/kg) of protein per day to preserve or build muscle once you're past the novice level as a natural trainee. Source. Adjust the carbs and fat grams to reach daily calorie goals. If doing a Standard Ketogenic Diet, carbs should be set lower than 30g: It is suggested you count carbs as TOTAL for all foods, except for green veggies and avocado, on those count as NET. Protein Ratio Macronutrients Macro Grams Kcal per gra Continue reading >>

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