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Keto Low Blood Sugar Reddit

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive Hypoglycemia

Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition in which the body reacts to a perceived catastrophic drop in blood sugar. I say perceived because during an episode, the blood sugar readings may be in the normal range, but still "feel" like low blood sugar to the person having the reaction. In my experience, hypoglycemia happens to most people when first beginning a low carb, ketogenic diet. It may be especially strong in people who have already developed insulin resistance or pre-diabetes from a chronic excess of carbohydrate intake. There are different types of low blood sugar causes. Transient hypoglycemia normally happens when most people who have been eating a high carb diet drastically reduce carbohydrate intake for the first time. This type happens during the first several weeks of carb reduction because the body has not had time to create the enzymes or metabolic state to burn internal fat stores for fuel. Basically there is a gap in the amount of carbohydrate available for fuel, and the process of accessing fat stores for fuel. The lack of fuel sources results in transient low blood sugar. Reactive hypoglycemia is more of an acute reaction to a very high carb meal. For instance, when a person eats 2 or 3 glazed donuts, there is a huge spike in blood sugar and compensating insulin secretion after such a meal. The large insulin spike drives blood sugar very low several hours after the meal. How Reactive Hypoglycemia Happens Insulin, a hormone, is secreted from the pancreas in response to eating food, especially foods high in carbohydrates. Its main job is to move the sugar your body makes from the food you eat into your cells so that this excess sugar can be broken down for energy or stored. Insulin is a very powerful hormone, and it acts very quickly. The amount of insulin Continue reading >>

10 Proven Health Benefits Of Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets

10 Proven Health Benefits Of Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets

Low-carb diets have been controversial for decades. They were originally demonized by fat-phobic health professionals and the media. People believed that these diets would raise cholesterol and cause heart disease because of the high fat content. However… times are changing. Since the year 2002, over 20 human studies have been conducted on low-carb diets. In almost every one of those studies, low-carb diets come out ahead of the diets they are compared to. Not only does low-carb cause more weight loss, it also leads to major improvements in most risk factors… including cholesterol. Here are the 10 proven health benefits of low-carb and ketogenic diets. 1. Low-Carb Diets Kill Your Appetite (in a Good Way) Hunger is the single worst side effect of dieting. It is one of the main reasons why many people feel miserable and eventually give up on their diets. One of the best things about eating low-carb is that it leads to an automatic reduction in appetite (1). The studies consistently show that when people cut carbs and eat more protein and fat, they end up eating much fewer calories. In fact… when researchers are comparing low-carb and low-fat diets in studies, they need to actively restrict calories in the low-fat groups to make the results comparable (2). Bottom Line: When people cut carbs, their appetite tends to go down and they often end up eating much fewer calories without trying. 2. Low-Carb Diets Lead to More Weight Loss Cutting carbs is one of the simplest and most effective ways to lose weight. Studies show that people on low-carb diets lose more weight, faster, than people on low-fat diets… even when the low-fat dieters are actively restricting calories. One of the reasons for this is that low-carb diets tend to get rid of excess water from the body. Bec Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia, Keto, And Me. : Keto

Hypoglycemia, Keto, And Me. : Keto

I just wanted to make a post for anyone who has hypoglycemia and is considering trying keto. I wish I had been able to find something like this when I was considering it because I was worried about how it would affect me, thinking it could be terrible for my health, considering hypoglycemia is low blood sugar and you're pretty much required to have ~0 intake of sugar in order to be in ketosis. Alas, my boyfriend, who'd done and loved keto in the past talked me into at least trying it.First, I'll start out with my symptoms before keto. Of course, as it goes, I would get headaches almost every night, get shaky, dizzy, hot, lightheaded, and often get to the point of being nauseous if I went even up to 4 hours between eating. Sucks. Of course, this didn't ALWAYS happen, but it lead to me eating more often than "necessary" and overeating. I was up to 168 lbs at my biggest, and as a 5'3 girl, that's fairly unhealthy. When I started keto, as I mentioned, I was worried that my symptoms would get worse due to not having sugar, which was my savior previously and the only way that I could get myself feeling normal again. But I thought I'd give it a shot, since I was over being tub-tub.My first day, I was SO WORRIED. I thought I was going to die. I was having all of my normal symptoms, but for a full ~36 hrs, as opposed to whatever short amount of time it takes for me to get some food in me. Then I remembered keto flu is a thing. Unfortunately, the symptoms of keto flu are (for me, at least) EXTREMELY similar to the symptoms of low blood sugar. But don't let it scare you too much. Just pop some almonds, drink LOTS of water, and let it pass. Once the keto flu passed, I cannot tell you how amazing I felt. The headaches stopped completely, I VERY rarely get shaky and lightheaded, and Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

I Went On The Silicon Valley Diet Craze That Encourages Butter And Bacon For 2 Months — And It Vastly Improved My Life

I Went On The Silicon Valley Diet Craze That Encourages Butter And Bacon For 2 Months — And It Vastly Improved My Life

Bacon became my new best friend on the ketogenic diet.Business Insider A viral diet that's been found to burn up to 10 times as much fat as a standard diet is gaining momentum among Silicon Valley tech workers. And it involves eating a lot of fat. The ketogenic, or "keto," diet — which first became popular in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and diabetes — limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, which is the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines from the US Department of Agriculture recommend from 225 to 325 grams of carbs a day. On the keto diet, the body goes into starvation mode and taps its fat stores for fuel. Studies suggest the low-carb, high-fat diet may promote weight loss, improve focus, and stave off age-related diseases. More research is needed on its long-term effects, especially among healthy people. A small study recently published in the journal Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome found that adults who had been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (a precursor of diabetes) and ate a ketogenic diet had resting metabolic rates (a measure of how much energy your body burns when at rest) more than 10 times as high as people who ate a standard diet. Last year, I spent two months eating bacon, butter, and avocados to see why the keto movement is so popular with tech workers. Here's what it was like. I am no stranger to diets. I've cut sugar, counted points on Weight Watchers, and swapped solid food for Soylent, a venture-capital-backed meal-replacement shake. Here's me eating a doughnut.Melia Robinson/Business Insider I gave up breakfast for a week and drank this caffeinated meal-replacement shake instead » But those usually don't last long. I love food. I'm a chronic snacker. Melia Robinson Continue reading >>

Blog: My Six Week Ketogenic Diet Experiment

Blog: My Six Week Ketogenic Diet Experiment

Disclaimer: The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Catalyst. This blog is not meant in any way as medical advice. Please consult a medical profession before commencing any new eating regime. What would you say if I told you there’s a diet where you can eat all the food you normally deny yourself, stop counting tedious calories, shift some weight, gain extra muscle and get an energy boost too? If you’re anything like me you’d be asking ‘where do I sign up?’! So when I heard about the ketogenic diet from a colleague I was immediately intrigued. This simply sounded too good to be true. Could I really eat fat and get lean? Enjoy peanut butter treats and squeeze into my skinny jeans? Never one to shy away from a challenge, I decided to see for myself, and so my six week experiment with the ketogenic diet began….. So what actually is a ketogenic, or ‘keto’, eating plan? In its most simple form, this is an extremely low-carb, high-fat diet. By lowering your carb intake your body is pushed into a metabolic state known as ketosis (key –tow –sis), where your body switches from burning carbs as its primary energy source to burning fat. To be more precise, it uses ketone bodies or ketones from the breakdown of fatty acids in the liver. Hence the name, ketosis. Now fatty fuel can come from a meal you’ve just eaten or from the stores of fat on your body (aka, the evil muffin top). While it may sound a little questionable, ketosis is actually an entirely natural metabolic process that the body initiates to help us survive when our food intake is low. Typically our body runs on glucose derived from the breakdown of carbs – this is because glucose is the easiest molecule for the body to convert and use as energy, so it will b Continue reading >>

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

Clay Rattenbury started the keto diet in 2014 because he wanted to lose weight. And it worked. He took 70 lbs (32 kg) off his 6’1′ (185 cm) frame in six months. During that time he drank alcohol every day — straight vodka, or vodka mixed with diet coke, often until he blacked out. Still, the weight came off. He actually liked the fact that the ketogenic diet lowered his alcohol tolerance: he’d get drunk faster. About six months into his keto journey, however, Rattenbury knew alcohol was causing too much havoc in his life, harming his health and hurting people he loved. He had to stop drinking. “I realized the way I ate and the way I consumed alcohol were very similar. Once I started I couldn’t stop. It was hard for me to do anything in moderation,” says Rattenbury, 28, who is in the US Navy. He has been sober now for 2.5 years and on the keto diet for three years (except for 8 weeks in Navy boot camp). He feels wonderful, both because of his diet and his sobriety. He is a lean, muscular 185 lbs (84 kg) and feels fit, strong and clear-headed. He enjoys working out regularly. The cravings for both his trigger foods and for alcohol are gone. He sees the two as being very closely related. And he will not risk, ever, bringing up those cravings again. “A few potato chips from time-to-time might not kick me out of ketosis, but it could very well awaken the cravings in me… so that saves me from taking the first bite. And I stay away from alcohol entirely. It is not worth taking a single sip, knowing where my mind goes when I drink.” Alcohol consumption and the keto diet is a hot topic. Many people who want to shed pounds come to ketogenic eating and are delighted that, unlike almost all diets, alcohol is not strictly forbidden when going low carb/high fat. W Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

The Truth About High Blood Sugar Levels : Keto

The Truth About High Blood Sugar Levels : Keto

This is for those who think they can eat whatever they want, weigh whatever they want and still have 'health at every size', this is the truth, the reality of what being overweight, eating whatever you want and doing no exercise does to you. This is a story about my mum, she was always big, overweight, fat, and obese, whatever you want to label it, she was that. When you get to a certain size because of body fat obviously your waist gets bigger too, now according to Diabetes UK a waist size over 31.4 for a woman and 35 for a man means you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (1/3 of new diabetes diagnoses are a 'normal' weight, more about this later). My mum developed type 2 diabetes, which is where the pancreas cannot cope with how much sugar there is in the body. There is too much and too often and it either gives up or becomes immune to the sugar in the blood. All type 2 diabetes is entirely preventable and caused by lack of exercise and too much sugar. My mum did not listen to her diabetic nurse who told her repeatedly what she should and shouldn't do. She ate lots of sweet, junk, carb heavy foods. And this is the effect it had on her. Her diabetic nurse told her she would have a heart attack or a stroke by 50...she still kept eating crap. Her eye sight was very poor; she was legally classed as partially sighted. Her mobility decreased until she was in a wheelchair, and even before that she barely walked or exercised, if she fell she couldn't get herself back up, due to lack of muscle but also her size, she was about (15-16 stones 210-225 pounds) and 5'3. She became incontinent both bowel and bladder and then had to use a commode, which was difficult to move her onto due to her size and weight. Her bowels, due to lack of muscle tone and her appalling diet Continue reading >>

Keto And Low Blood Sugar? Pcos Help. : Keto

Keto And Low Blood Sugar? Pcos Help. : Keto

Hello! I'm new here and have a question. I have PCOS and take metformin (a diabetes medicine) as well as aldactone (a blood pressure medicine). I do not have high blood pressure or diabetes, but these medications are commonly prescribed to women with PCOS for other reasons. My issue is this - in doing keto, I commonly get low blood sugar. I know this is likely related to the medication but I cannot stop taking it yet. I get dizzy and feel as if I'm going to pass out. The treatment for this is sugar, however that knocks me out of keto. Currently, I'm keeping my carbs pretty high (around 80g/day) to combat this. I still register in low ketosis with keto sticks at this level, and I am losing weight, albeit slowly, which I am fine with. I'm wondering if anyone who is taking these medications (the metformin is likely the culprit) has had similar experience and can offer advice. I take 500mg only once per day - down from 500mg 3x per day. Any ways to avoid the low blood sugar while cutting my carbs more? Just for additional info, I eat 1400 calories a day and I do use dairy. Not a big milk person but I eat cheese, butter, half and half in my coffee, etc. My daily goal is 25% protein, 15% carbs (I exceed this lately) and 60% fat. I have approximately 100 pounds to lose. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar At 65 - Keto

Blood Sugar At 65 - Keto

It's fine, your brain is fueled by ketones. 33/M/6'2" | SW 250 | CW 191 | GW 185 | 24% BF | Lightly active Just rechecked, got a 77. Bad test strip? It's possible. Maybe you also have naturally low blood sugar? How often do you test? I just started yesterday. I woke up to 131 after 10 hours of not eating. :( But, since I started keto, it hasn't been above 139 after meals. 33/M/6'2" | SW 250 | CW 191 | GW 185 | 24% BF | Lightly active I was pre-diabetic last year at my checkup with a fasting glucose level of 125. Seems to be quite a reversal since starting Keto. I was just diagnosed with type 2, 3 weks ago. My a1c is 8.1. Do you take metformin or invokana? Because in the brief time I was on metformin my blood sugar dropped to dangerously low levels. I had to stop taking it because I had all the adverse reactions possible, except death lol Now I just do keto and my levels are more normalized but it's only been 2 weeks so they'll improve if I stick with it. Which I have to do because the meds don't work for me. Anyway, back to my original question, metformin can cause dangerously low blood sugar levels when used in conjunction with keto. Okay. So maybe you just have naturally low fasting blood sugar. Which isn't a bad thing really. Probably not a bad strip. Glucose meters aren't particularly precise. They can have somewhere around 15% inaccuracy. Don't stress too much about a single number. The glucometers available to consumers are pretty accurate, but they all have some degree of variance. That means that If you check your blood sugar 10 times in a row, you won't get the exact same result each time. It would probably look something like 80, 84, 81, 78, 80, 82, 79, etc. The booklet that came with it should include information about how large of a variance is permitted. A Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

A Comprehensive Beginner's Guide

What is a Keto Diet? A keto diet is well known for being a low carb diet, where the body produces ketones in the liver to be used as energy. It’s referred to as many different names – ketogenic diet, low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), etc. When you eat something high in carbs, your body will produce glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that it will be chosen over any other energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by taking it around the body. Since the glucose is being used as a primary energy, your fats are not needed and are therefore stored. Typically on a normal, higher carbohydrate diet, the body will use glucose as the main form of energy. By lowering the intake of carbs, the body is induced into a state known as ketosis. Ketosis is a natural process the body initiates to help us survive when food intake is low. During this state, we produce ketones, which are produced from the breakdown of fats in the liver. The end goal of a properly maintained keto diet is to force your body into this metabolic state. We don’t do this through starvation of calories but starvation of carbohydrates. Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits. Make keto simple and easy by checking out our 30 Day Meal Plan. Get meal plans, shopping lists, and much more with our Keto Academy Program. Looking for Something Specific? There are numerous benefits that come with being on keto: from weight loss and increased energy levels to therapeutic medical appl Continue reading >>

[psa] Diabetes + Keto + Alcohol = Dangerous Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia) - Keto

[psa] Diabetes + Keto + Alcohol = Dangerous Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia) - Keto

[PSA] Diabetes + Keto + Alcohol = Dangerous low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) If you have diabetes, you probably know that drinking alcohol can drop your blood sugar dangerously low, especially if you take insulin. If you're on keto, you probably know that your alcohol tolerance is reduced. If you're diabetic on keto, please don't drink, because it will take less to drop your sugar, especially if you've been active or fasting. This can happen very quickly and there is a real risk of dying from hypoglycemia or possibly alcohol poisoning. Drinking temporarily stops production of ketones and on keto you have no or reduced glycogen (which you liver releases to process alcohol). This can cause confusion and black outs even if you haven't had much to drink. If your blood sugar crashes, you might not be able to help yourself, and other people will probably think you're just drunk. My husband nearly died last night after his blood sugar crashed from moderate drinking. He'd previously had a good grasp on how alcohol effected his blood sugar, and his blood alcohol was below the legal limit. But it was a perfect storm: he'd played football that day, burned up his glycogen, was on ketosis and had low tolerance. He'd taken my car, which doesn't have any glucose tabs in it. We've drank twice since starting keto, were aware of the effects, but still had a inaccurate idea of what our limits are on ketosis. Because the previous time was on a planned cheat day, it gave us a false sense of security. This has been a terrifying and almost tragic day... please, if you're diabetic, don't risk it. And wear your medical ID and keep glucose gel (tabs can be a choking hazard) handy. Stay safe! Continue reading >>

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