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Keto Isn T Sustainable

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as “keto” blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit, and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

10/23/17 Keto Diet Basics, How And Why It Is The Best Option For Sustainable Weight Loss.

10/23/17 Keto Diet Basics, How And Why It Is The Best Option For Sustainable Weight Loss.

How is it science develops these amazing discoveries but it isn’t until the mainstream media and Kim Kardashian loses 60 pounds on the Keto Diet that people start asking about it? Dr Ortiz explains the basics on what the Keto diet is and how it is different from every diet ever used for weight loss. Today’s guest is Lucia Chavez chief nutritionist at OCC discusses the benefits of a Keto diet and how it is being used to control metabolic disease…. the miraculous reverting of diabetes and high blood pressure. 1 Keto Diet and Kim Kardashian 2 Keto Diet: Saturated Fat...the more the merrier! 3 Keto Diet: Carb loading all the way to the grave! 4 Keto Diet and Protein...enough is enough! Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Weight Loss?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Weight Loss?

Share it: If you’ve been contemplating various weight-loss strategies, you may have run across the ketogenic diet. This dietary strategy, which is often used in a clinical setting to help improve seizure control in children with epilepsy, is picking up steam as an effective treatment for weight loss. But is it right for you? We turned to the experts to find out more. WHAT IS IT? The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis, where fat is burned for fuel instead of carbohydrate. (This isn’t to be confused with ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition typically caused by a lack of insulin in the body.) According to Dominic D’Agostino, a researcher at the University of South Florida who specializes in ketogenic diets, “The ‘classic ketogenic diet’ used originally for the management of drug-resistance seizures is a 4:1 ratio of fats to protein and carbohydrates.” That equates to about 80–90% fat, 5–15% protein and 5–10% carbohydrates. For weight loss, he says, this diet is typically modified “to allow a more liberal consumption of protein” (20–30%) with the same carbohydrate restriction. IS IT FOR YOU? Advocates of the ketogenic diet are quick to point out many of the benefits this diet can have for those looking to lose weight. “Rapid weight loss and a decrease in hunger are the most common and evident benefits,” says Kristen Mancinelli, MS, RD, author of “The Ketogenic Diet: A Scientifically Proven Approach to Fast, Healthy Weight Loss.” D’Agostino references promising studies that have been shown to “lower blood glucose levels, increase sensitivity to insulin, decrease inflammation and reduce triglyceride levels while raising HDL cholesterol.” READ MORE > 21 DIETIT Continue reading >>

Should You Follow The Ketogenic Diet?

Should You Follow The Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet may be on the rise as far as diet trends go, but the concept isn't new. First identified as a beneficial treatment for epilepsy, the high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate approach has been around for close to 100 years. Recently, the diet has become popular among athletes (LeBron James tried it) and those looking for the next weight-loss cure-all. Followers eat foods like butter, oils, fatty meats and cheese. Proponents claim it can lower cholesterol and improve athletic performance, but before you go "keto," here's a look at the science behind the popular diet. Try It: How to Start a Low-Carb Diet the Healthy Way Ketogenic Diet Basics The keto diet requires the body to rely mostly on fat for energy, rather than the usual carbohydrates (see Carbohydrates vs. Fat for Fuel below). When carb intake is very low, ketones—products of fat breakdown in the liver—must fuel the body. According to John Hawley, Ph.D., director of the Centre for Exercise and Nutrition at Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research in Melbourne, Australia, there is no global definition of the ketogenic diet. In other words, no standard exists for how many grams of carbohydrate, fat, or protein should be consumed when following the diet. Most research around the diet has identified a carbohydrate intake between 25 and 50 grams per day, which is equivalent to two medium apples or one cup of cooked brown rice. This extreme reduction in carbohydrate is very difficult to maintain long-term and makes it impossible to meet the recommended amount of fruit, vegetable and whole-grain servings recommended for a healthy diet. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, carbohydrates should make up 45 to 60 percent of daily calories, or 130 grams/day, for most people to eat a balanced die Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Why I Wouldn’t Follow A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Wouldn’t Follow A Ketogenic Diet

In this episode, Katrina Mills and I discuss ketogenic diets and the type of ketogenic diets that are out on the market at the moment. We discuss their use in medicine treating kids with epilepsy and more commercially in adult weight loss. We explore some of the negative side effects of going ketogenic, as well as some of the results people are experiencing on the ketogenic diet. If you like this episode please tell your friends, write us a comment below and rate the show on iTunes! Podcast summary Why I wouldn’t follow a Ketogenic Diet With Gabby & Katrina Mills Low carb, high fat Ketogenic diets are very popular on social media and a wide range of people are trying it. 80% of diet comes from fat and 20% comes from protein and a very small amount of carbohydrates. Body uses ketones (from stored fat) for energy instead of glucose. Keeps the body in a fat-burning state as fat is used for energy instead of glucose. Popular with bodybuilders. Used in some medical circles to treat children with epilepsy as it may help prevent seizures in children who are non-responsive to medication (but studies have shown it only helps 30% of these children). Organ damage is a warning of this diet and when it is used for children with epilepsy, strict medical supervision must accompany the diet. The calories you’re eating must be strictly monitored to make sure you’re not eating more than your body needs. This diet maybe unsustainable in the long-term for a lot of people. Cons: places a huge stress on liver and kidneys and kidney and gallstones are a possible side effect of the diet. The food plan is very rigid: 80% coming from fat needs to be a lot of pure fat sources. There’s not a lot of room in the diet for much else. Lacks vitamin and minerals and leads to extreme fatigue, the Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: The Low-carb Plan That Promises Maximum Weight Loss

The Keto Diet: The Low-carb Plan That Promises Maximum Weight Loss

Ever tried giving up bread and pasta to shift the pounds? Well, the Ketogenic or Keto diet takes low-carb eating one step further… Invented by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in the US, it's been practised since the 1920s and is essentially a very low-carb, high-fat diet that puts your body in a metabolic state called ketosis. This is a process that means your body uses fat for energy instead of glucose. There's no counting calories here – it's simply about changing the source of fuel your body uses to stay energised. How does the Keto diet work? When your body has limited access to glucose it starts to use fat for fuel instead. The theory is that by eating very few carbs and removing certain foods from your diet, such as sugary treats and grains, and cutting down on potatoes, some fruits, and legumes, you encourage your body to go into the state of ketosis. Dr Kristie Sullivan, author of A Journey Worth Taking: Cooking Keto with Kristie and new book Keto Living Day-by-Day (out in March) says: 'There are different levels of low-carb, but a Ketogenic diet is by definition one in which 70% or more of calories are derived from fat, 25% from protein, and five per cent or fewer from carbohydrate. 'The idea is to starve the body of glucose so that your body burns fat instead.' Can you lose weight on the Keto diet? It does seem to be effective at shifting the pounds. A 2003 US study on healthy but obese women showed that a very low-carbohydrate diet is more effective than a low-fat diet for short-term weight loss, although later studies have challenged this thinking. When it comes to how quickly you will lose weight, everybody is different and, as with many diets, if you have a lot of excess pounds to shed, you may notice faster weight loss in the beginning, which may then slow Continue reading >>

Is A Low-carb Diet Sustainable For Life?

Is A Low-carb Diet Sustainable For Life?

In 2012, I received a friendly comment from a reader who suggested that the lack of dieting success I was having at the time was probably due to my inability to stay with one particular low-carb diet plan long enough to reap results. The advice I received: Go on a low-carb, high-fat diet (LCHF) and give it six months or more to work before analyzing. This was similar to the advice I received from the zero-carb folks a few years ago. Despite the fact that I had gained about 20 pounds in the first three weeks and was experiencing abnormally high blood glucose levels, they told me to: eat only beef drink only water wait six months before reviewing the results The zero-carb forum participants didn't seem to care about the neuropathy that had come back. They were just sure that their way was the only way. The problem with this type of advice is that it doesn't work for everyone. I can see the wisdom in sticking to one particular plan for a certain stretch of time, before analyzing, but at this point in my weight loss journey, I had been doing low carb for 5 years. How much longer did I have to wait? Correcting metabolic issues isn't always as easy as lowering your carbohydrate level. For example, I am juggling: vertigo (vestimbular dysfunction or Meniere's Disease) celiac disease several food sensitivities Graves' Disease (hyperthyroidism) So my problems with sustainability are more complex than simply going back onto a very low-carb, high-fat diet, ignoring the physical consequences, and giving the plan six months to work -- no matter how much weight I regain. For those with autoimmune thyroid disease, that type of advice is dangerous. LCHF diets trigger my thyroid to overreact, creating too much Free T3, which causes my heart to race as well as puts me in starvation mode b Continue reading >>

Top 11 Low Carb Myths

Top 11 Low Carb Myths

The top 11 low carb myths, I bet you’ve heard them already – it’s dangerous, it’s unhealthy, it’s unsustainable, it’s restrictive, there’s no evidence – well let me explain why all those low carb myths are unfounded, and in fact, I can show you how each of the low carb myths can be counter-argued. Generally low carb myths are being circulated by those who may not have researched low carb and make assumptions, or by those who haven’t caught up with the science. Studies continue to support the fact that low carb is an excellent choice for weight loss, heart health, diabetes (T1 and T2), nutrition, gut health, mental clarity and more information is coming to light regarding the ketogenic diet in the role of adjunctive cancer therapy. We eat no carbs and we restrict fruit and vegetables – firstly we are low carb not no carb and secondly there are no essential carbohydrates known. We have essential fatty acids and essential proteins, but there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. We eat fruit, but we choose nutrient dense fruit such as berries, but stay away from high sugar tropical fruits such as mango, bananas and pineapple. When we do eat carbs, it is from nutrient dense lower carb vegetables, nuts, berries and dairy. Our vegetable intake for most people actually increases. We remove the processed carbs from our diet and replace them with more vegetables. We no longer use carbs such as rice, pasta and bread to bulk up our meals, we use vegetables. We eat far too much meat and protein – sorry, another myth. We eat moderate protein. Too much protein is converted into glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. We also advocate to eat meat that has had minimal intervention such as steaks, roasts, drumsticks, organ meats. There is a vast differenc Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know Before Going On A Low-carb Diet

Everything You Need To Know Before Going On A Low-carb Diet

Much like Oprah, we LOVE bread. So naturally, the thought of cutting it out of our lives (along with any other carbs) is terrifying. But then again, if everyone and their mom (and lots of scientific research) claim that quitting carbohydrates is the key to weight loss, there's got to be something to it, right? Whether it takes the form of Atkins or the Paleo Diet, the low-carb trend has been around for a long time. But chances are you might not fully understand where it came from, how it works, and why experts are torn on whether this eating plan is smart. Here, we break down all of that so you can decide if carb-cutting in the name of weight loss is worth it. What Low Carb Actually Means Depending on who you talk to, there are different definitions of a low-carb diet. Plans can range from 100 grams of carbohydrates per day to zero grams (yikes), says Susan Kleiner, Ph.D, R.D., author of Power Eating. To put that into perspective, a small piece of fruit has about 15 grams of carbs and a banana contains up to 30 grams. For the sake of this article, though, we'll talk about a diet containing 100 grams of carbs per day, for someone who exercises three times a week at a moderate pace. For everyone else, a true low-carb diet would be about 50 grams per day, says Kleiner. What’s Considered a Carb? Unfortunately for Regina George, butter is not a carb. But according to the USDA’s Nutrient Database, lots of foods, including fruits and veggies, contain high amounts of carbohydrates. Though you probably know potatoes and bananas are packed with the carbohydrates, over 20 grams of the macronutrient are also found in a serving of grapes, apples, pears, and cauliflower. Plus, dried fruits, such as apricots, cranberries, and raisins, have a whopping 80 grams per serving. You’ll Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe And Does It Work?

The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe And Does It Work?

The ketogenic diet is fast becoming a trend among individuals looking for quick, dramatic weight loss. But is it effective, and more importantly is it safe? We spoke to Dr Alan Barclay, Accredited Practising Dietitian and Research Associate at The University of Sydney about this latest dietary fad. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet (or 'keto' as it is sometimes called) is a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet, similar in nature to the Atkins Diet. The aim of this diet, Dr Barclay explains, is to: "significantly decrease the amount of carbohydrate in your diet, so that the body switches from primarily burning carbohydrates, to burning fat, for energy." With the absence of sufficient carbohydrate and the abundance of dietary fat, your liver generates greater quantities of what are known as 'ketone bodies', and this puts your body into a metabolic state known as 'ketosis'. In ketosis, your body becomes incredibly efficient at using ketone bodies, generated from the breakdown of fat, as fuel. In other words, your body will burn more body fat. What foods are excluded on this diet? Generally, the ketogenic diet reduces or excludes carbohydrate-containing foods, including breads, breakfast cereals, pasta, rice, quinoa, couscous, starchy vegetables (potato, sweet potato, corn), fruit, and legumes. It tends to encourage consumption of more high fat foods, such as fatty meats, full-cream dairy, butter, nuts, avocado, olive oil and coconut oil. A standard ketogenic diet consists of a split of around 30% protein, 60% fats and 10% carbohydrates. Experts advise that you should eat no more than 50g of net carbs a day for the body to stay in a ketogenic state. 50g of carbs is equivalent to one cup of oats, one medium sweet potato, one cup cooked brown rice or one slice ry Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Quick And Sustainable?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Quick And Sustainable?

It may help with quick fat loss, but I’d argue that it isn’t as sustainable as a moderate approach. You may have a look at my blog TURN where you’ll find the nutrition basics series and soon the exercise basics series (starting in September) for fat loss and physique enhancement. There you can find an alternative that’ll also help you lose body fat - without having you worrying about low carb, no carb, carb cycling and other issues associated with keto diets. I’d be glad if that helps you achieve what you’re after. Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Keto: Which Diet Is More Sustainable?

Paleo Vs. Keto: Which Diet Is More Sustainable?

Paleo vs. Keto: Which Diet is More Sustainable? There are more gimmicky diets thrown at us than ever before. Diet plans and programs that are downright silly, at best. Most, if not all of these diets are unsustainable and unrealistic. Take “The Five-Bite Diet,” where you skip breakfast and only allow yourself five bites of any forbidden food of your choice for lunch and dinner. As if this isn’t whacky enough, there’s the Cookie Diet, the Baby Food Diet, the Blood Type Diet, and The Werewolf Diet. Yep, the freaking Werewolf Diet! Besides the fact that none of these diets are healthy, they aren’t sustainable. It’s difficult NOT to be dogmatic when speaking about this stuff. Many of these quick-fix solutions are discouraging people to the point of giving up — causing them to become permanently skeptical of any and all health advice! The best diets are the ones that don’t feel like diets. Of course, any significant shift in your daily eating routine will be a challenge, but there’s no way around it if you want to see (and feel) long-term results. “You can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.” -Dr. Mark Hyman If we want to look and feel our best (for as long as we can), then we need to adjust the way we look at food, and this is rarely a comfortable transition. But this transition doesn’t have to be dreadful. In fact, it can be life-changing. On this note, I want to share two of the most well-recognized diet programs in the world: THE PALEO DIET THE KETOGENIC DIET These two powerhouses have stood the test of time and are attractive to people because of their astounding health and weight-loss benefits. I’m going to provide a simple overview of both diets — including their history, structure, similarities, and differences. When you’re finished Continue reading >>

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