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Keto Isn T Sustainable

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as “keto” blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit, and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but Continue reading >>

10/23/17 Keto Diet Basics, How And Why It Is The Best Option For Sustainable Weight Loss.

10/23/17 Keto Diet Basics, How And Why It Is The Best Option For Sustainable Weight Loss.

How is it science develops these amazing discoveries but it isn’t until the mainstream media and Kim Kardashian loses 60 pounds on the Keto Diet that people start asking about it? Dr Ortiz explains the basics on what the Keto diet is and how it is different from every diet ever used for weight loss. Today’s guest is Lucia Chavez chief nutritionist at OCC discusses the benefits of a Keto diet and how it is being used to control metabolic disease…. the miraculous reverting of diabetes and high blood pressure. 1 Keto Diet and Kim Kardashian 2 Keto Diet: Saturated Fat...the more the merrier! 3 Keto Diet: Carb loading all the way to the grave! 4 Keto Diet and Protein...enough is enough! Continue reading >>

Why I Wouldn’t Follow A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Wouldn’t Follow A Ketogenic Diet

In this episode, Katrina Mills and I discuss ketogenic diets and the type of ketogenic diets that are out on the market at the moment. We discuss their use in medicine treating kids with epilepsy and more commercially in adult weight loss. We explore some of the negative side effects of going ketogenic, as well as some of the results people are experiencing on the ketogenic diet. If you like this episode please tell your friends, write us a comment below and rate the show on iTunes! Podcast summary Why I wouldn’t follow a Ketogenic Diet With Gabby & Katrina Mills Low carb, high fat Ketogenic diets are very popular on social media and a wide range of people are trying it. 80% of diet comes from fat and 20% comes from protein and a very small amount of carbohydrates. Body uses ketones (from stored fat) for energy instead of glucose. Keeps the body in a fat-burning state as fat is used for energy instead of glucose. Popular with bodybuilders. Used in some medical circles to treat children with epilepsy as it may help prevent seizures in children who are non-responsive to medication (but studies have shown it only helps 30% of these children). Organ damage is a warning of this diet and when it is used for children with epilepsy, strict medical supervision must accompany the diet. The calories you’re eating must be strictly monitored to make sure you’re not eating more than your body needs. This diet maybe unsustainable in the long-term for a lot of people. Cons: places a huge stress on liver and kidneys and kidney and gallstones are a possible side effect of the diet. The food plan is very rigid: 80% coming from fat needs to be a lot of pure fat sources. There’s not a lot of room in the diet for much else. Lacks vitamin and minerals and leads to extreme fatigue, the Continue reading >>

Should You Follow The Ketogenic Diet?

Should You Follow The Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet may be on the rise as far as diet trends go, but the concept isn't new. First identified as a beneficial treatment for epilepsy, the high-fat, very-low-carbohydrate approach has been around for close to 100 years. Recently, the diet has become popular among athletes (LeBron James tried it) and those looking for the next weight-loss cure-all. Followers eat foods like butter, oils, fatty meats and cheese. Proponents claim it can lower cholesterol and improve athletic performance, but before you go "keto," here's a look at the science behind the popular diet. Try It: How to Start a Low-Carb Diet the Healthy Way Ketogenic Diet Basics The keto diet requires the body to rely mostly on fat for energy, rather than the usual carbohydrates (see Carbohydrates vs. Fat for Fuel below). When carb intake is very low, ketones—products of fat breakdown in the liver—must fuel the body. According to John Hawley, Ph.D., director of the Centre for Exercise and Nutrition at Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research in Melbourne, Australia, there is no global definition of the ketogenic diet. In other words, no standard exists for how many grams of carbohydrate, fat, or protein should be consumed when following the diet. Most research around the diet has identified a carbohydrate intake between 25 and 50 grams per day, which is equivalent to two medium apples or one cup of cooked brown rice. This extreme reduction in carbohydrate is very difficult to maintain long-term and makes it impossible to meet the recommended amount of fruit, vegetable and whole-grain servings recommended for a healthy diet. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, carbohydrates should make up 45 to 60 percent of daily calories, or 130 grams/day, for most people to eat a balanced die Continue reading >>

Keto Diet And Its Health Benefits

Keto Diet And Its Health Benefits

Overview A keto diet refers to a ketogenic diet, which is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carb diet. The goal is to get more calories from protein and fat than from carbs. It works by depleting your body of its store of sugar, so it will start to break down protein and fat for energy, causing ketosis (and weight loss). One extremely popular version of a keto diet is the Atkins diet. Read on to learn the benefits of the keto diet. Contents of this article: 1. Aids in weight loss It takes more work to turn fat into energy than it takes to turn carbs into energy. Because of this, a ketogenic diet can help speed up weight loss. And since the diet is high in protein, it doesn't leave you hungry like other diets do. In a meta-analysis of 13 different randomized controlled trials, 5 outcomes revealed significant weight loss from a ketogenic diet. 2. Reduces acne There are a number of different causes of acne, and one may be related to diet and blood sugar. Eating a diet high in processed and refined carbohydrates can alter gut bacteria and cause more dramatic blood sugar fluctuations, both of which can have an influence on skin health. Therefore, by decreasing carb intake, it's not a surprise that a ketogenic diet could reduce some cases of acne. 3. May help reduce risk of cancer The ketogenic diet has recently been investigated a great deal for how it may help prevent or even treat certain cancers. One study found that the ketogenic diet may be a suitable complementary treatment to chemotherapy and radiation in people with cancer. This is due to the fact that it would cause more oxidative stress in cancer cells than in normal cells. Other theories suggest that because the ketogenic diet reduces high blood sugar, it could reduce insulin complications, which may be associated Continue reading >>

Is Keto Sustainable?

Is Keto Sustainable?

I recently had a conversation with a doctor, an eye doctor, who is keto-friendly. During this conversation, he made the statement that keto (the Ketogenic Diet and Lifestyle) is unsustainable. My only response to that was, “We disagree about that.” And I was ready to let it go. Not because I didn’t feel comfortable with the subject matter, but because I didn’t want to get into an argument while he was checking my eyesight. But it got me thinking about that particular line of argument. When someone says, “It’s not sustainable,” what are they really saying? What does “sustainable” really mean? As best as I can tell, based upon the people who ask the question, it means, “Can you be keto for the rest of your life?” Can you, for the rest of your life, eat high-fat, moderate-protein, and very low-carb food? And on the surface, this might seem like a fair question. But it’s not a fair question. It’s a stupid one. First of all, it’s asking if you can predict the future. Can you say, with all certainty that you will stick to the strictest ketogenic definition of food for the remainder of your life? Or will you have to, on occasion, make due with some fat-free cheese? Or some white meat chicken? Or a salad without any fat in it? Sometimes we have to make the best of a bad situation. Sometimes we don’t have a say in what gets served. We always have a choice about whether or not we eat it, though, but that’s another discussion. So it’s a stupid question, because you can’t predict the future. But you can be as keto-prepared as possible. Second, it’s asking if you’ll ever eat non-keto foods. So, let’s pretend that you’re at a restaurant, and you ask all the right questions about the meal you’re ordering: real butter, no sugar, no breading Continue reading >>

How Can I Say Eating Low Carb Is Sustainable? Well, Because It Is.

How Can I Say Eating Low Carb Is Sustainable? Well, Because It Is.

One of the slams one hears or reads about the ketogenic, low carb/high fat (LCHF) diet is that it can't be followed long term and that all diets fail. (That, and 'It will wreck your kidneys' ... 'Your cholesterol is going to go sky high' .... 'You might lose weight but that won't help you if you keel over from a heart attack' ... 'Carbs are required to make glucose so your brain can function properly' ... 'You'll shoot your eye out, kid!') Wait. That last one is about something else altogether.. The idea that eating a low carbohydrate diet won't work because all diets fail, which one might even hear from medical doctors, is maybe the most bothersome. If all diets fail then what's the point of trying ANY diets? Seriously. Let's just revel in the obesity epidemic, turn our healthcare system over to more and more treatment for the horrible side effects of Type II diabetes and call it a day. More to the point, though, a ketogenic, low carb way of eating is imminently sustainable. Personally, as of today, I've been following the program for two years, seven months and ten days. Not a single day, meal or snack off plan. Excuse me, I did eat a sliver of our older son's wedding cake in April of 2014. Other than that, I've remained below 20 carbohydrates per day - usually well below. And I'm not dead yet. I see no reason to ever change. As for my brain suffering from lack of carbohydrate intake, all I can say is that I'm able to string all the words written here together in a somewhat cogent manner. I dare say that my intellect has gotten back to where it was in my youth. I was really clever then. Then things got a bit foggy. Now I'm clever again. That is, I'm clever enough to keep at least myself entertained. But let's take it further. Jacqueline Eberstein, R.N., whom I had the Continue reading >>

(diet Review) Is The Ketogenic (low Carb High Fat) Diet Safe And Sustainable?

(diet Review) Is The Ketogenic (low Carb High Fat) Diet Safe And Sustainable?

I was trained in nutrition school to vehemently oppose ketogenic (otherwise known as low carb, high fat or #LCHF) diets. The very mention of a zero carb diet makes most dietitians recoil, and I was no exception. Ketogenic diets have generally been recognized among nutrition professionals as being unsafe, unsustainable, and inadequate in nutrients. But are they? A lot of people have asked me this question, so I’m going to review the ketogenic diet for use in weight management and overall wellness. There are other uses for this diet (ie epilepsy and brain injury) which I won’t be talking about here. Ready? Here we go! What is ketosis? The quick and dirty answer is: ketosis is when your liver turns fat and certain amino acids into ketones to fuel your body, because no carbohydrate (or, under 50 grams a day for most people) is available. One thing must be said: dietary ketosis is NOT diabetic ketoacidosis, so let’s not make that mistake. Without going into detail, people who produce insulin don’t go into ketoacidosis, which can be fatal. Moving on. When you eat adequate carbohydrates, your body and especially your brain, will use them as glycogen as its first source of energy. Carbohydrates are easy for your body to convert to energy, and generally anything alive will always choose the easiest path it needs for anything. Your brain in particular loves glucose. The brain is equipped to use only two fuels to function: glucose or ketones. When glucose is unavailable, ketones are its next best option. So, your body starts producing them, because without your brain, you’re dead. Magically, without any carbohydrates consumed, your body can derive some glucose from fatty acids and amino acids. Isn’t nature wonderful? So how do you send yourself into ketosis? You don’ Continue reading >>

Tips On How To Make Keto Sustainable

Tips On How To Make Keto Sustainable

1,462 views How can you make the transition to a low-carb or keto diet as smooth as possible? Kristie Sullivan should know, since she has successfully been on the diet for four years. In this interview she shares her best tips and tricks, ranging from eating out at restaurants to quick dishes to make when you have no time. Watch a part of the interview above (transcript). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership: Tips on how to make keto sustainable – Kristie Sullivan, PhD Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service. Ketosis More Keto for beginners Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Will Help You Lose Weight — But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Will Help You Lose Weight — But Is It Safe?

Keto may be the trendiest thing since Paleo, but does it work. And is it safe? The ketogenic diet might seem like the latest instalment in a long line of low-carb fad diets. But don’t be fooled—this increasingly popular diet has actually been around for just shy of a century. First used to treat children with epilepsy, it was developed by a doctor in the 1920s. These days, keto is seeing a revival. The benefits? Weight loss, for one. But aside from its fat-burning properties, it’s also been touted as an effective diabetes management tool, since it minimizes carbs. Though long-term studies into the diet’s risks and benefits are limited, keto may also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, aid the treatment of certain types of cancer, and combat symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Breaking Down the Keto Diet The keto diet is a low-to-no carb diet. Keto dieters track their “macros,” or macronutrients, to make sure they’re getting most of their calories from fat (60-75 percent), some of their calories from protein (15-30 percent), and very few of their calories from carbohydrates (5-10 percent). On the plate, the emphasis is on meat, fish, cheese, butter, cream, and low-carb veggies such as cabbage, cauliflower, or salad greens. Carb consumption is capped at a maximum of 20 grams per day. That’s just a little bit more than an apple. There are no restrictions on how many calories keto dieters can consume in a day. The focus is on listening to when you feel hungry or full, though high-fat foods are said to improve satiety. Keto Works by Co-Opting Your Body’s “Fasting” Mechanism In a normal diet, carbs are the main energy source. However, when you deprive your body of carbs, it goes into fasting mode, even if you continue to take in fat and protein. Th Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: The Low-carb Plan That Promises Maximum Weight Loss

The Keto Diet: The Low-carb Plan That Promises Maximum Weight Loss

Ever tried giving up bread and pasta to shift the pounds? Well, the Ketogenic or Keto diet takes low-carb eating one step further… Invented by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in the US, it's been practised since the 1920s and is essentially a very low-carb, high-fat diet that puts your body in a metabolic state called ketosis. This is a process that means your body uses fat for energy instead of glucose. There's no counting calories here – it's simply about changing the source of fuel your body uses to stay energised. How does the Keto diet work? When your body has limited access to glucose it starts to use fat for fuel instead. The theory is that by eating very few carbs and removing certain foods from your diet, such as sugary treats and grains, and cutting down on potatoes, some fruits, and legumes, you encourage your body to go into the state of ketosis. Dr Kristie Sullivan, author of A Journey Worth Taking: Cooking Keto with Kristie and new book Keto Living Day-by-Day (out in March) says: 'There are different levels of low-carb, but a Ketogenic diet is by definition one in which 70% or more of calories are derived from fat, 25% from protein, and five per cent or fewer from carbohydrate. 'The idea is to starve the body of glucose so that your body burns fat instead.' Can you lose weight on the Keto diet? It does seem to be effective at shifting the pounds. A 2003 US study on healthy but obese women showed that a very low-carbohydrate diet is more effective than a low-fat diet for short-term weight loss, although later studies have challenged this thinking. When it comes to how quickly you will lose weight, everybody is different and, as with many diets, if you have a lot of excess pounds to shed, you may notice faster weight loss in the beginning, which may then slow Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Keto: Which Diet Is More Sustainable?

Paleo Vs. Keto: Which Diet Is More Sustainable?

Paleo vs. Keto: Which Diet is More Sustainable? There are more gimmicky diets thrown at us than ever before. Diet plans and programs that are downright silly, at best. Most, if not all of these diets are unsustainable and unrealistic. Take “The Five-Bite Diet,” where you skip breakfast and only allow yourself five bites of any forbidden food of your choice for lunch and dinner. As if this isn’t whacky enough, there’s the Cookie Diet, the Baby Food Diet, the Blood Type Diet, and The Werewolf Diet. Yep, the freaking Werewolf Diet! Besides the fact that none of these diets are healthy, they aren’t sustainable. It’s difficult NOT to be dogmatic when speaking about this stuff. Many of these quick-fix solutions are discouraging people to the point of giving up — causing them to become permanently skeptical of any and all health advice! The best diets are the ones that don’t feel like diets. Of course, any significant shift in your daily eating routine will be a challenge, but there’s no way around it if you want to see (and feel) long-term results. “You can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.” -Dr. Mark Hyman If we want to look and feel our best (for as long as we can), then we need to adjust the way we look at food, and this is rarely a comfortable transition. But this transition doesn’t have to be dreadful. In fact, it can be life-changing. On this note, I want to share two of the most well-recognized diet programs in the world: THE PALEO DIET THE KETOGENIC DIET These two powerhouses have stood the test of time and are attractive to people because of their astounding health and weight-loss benefits. I’m going to provide a simple overview of both diets — including their history, structure, similarities, and differences. When you’re finished Continue reading >>

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