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Keto High Ldl

Why The High Fat, Low Carb 'keto Diet' Fails The Comment Sense Test

Why The High Fat, Low Carb 'keto Diet' Fails The Comment Sense Test

Renae Gilley used to be a size 22. Through diet and exercise she is now a size 10 and doesn't plan to look back. She was pre-diabetic and needed to make changes in her life. Two years later she works out nearly every day and keeps diabetes at bay. Michael Clevenger, CJ Last week I discussed the Keto diet, high in fat and very low in carbs, and why it’s not a good choice. A much better choice is a healthy well-balanced diet loaded with complex carbs (fruits, vegetables and whole grains), protein and modest fat intake. Going hand in hand with a healthy diet is daily exercise. When it comes to comparing diets, like comparing the Keto Diet with a healthy and well-balanced diet, it’s best to examine scientific data. Both diets can help reduce weight, which in turn helps lower blood pressure and serum cholesterol. Does that mean both diets are equally good for you? No. With the Keto Diet, kidney stones and accelerated osteoporosis arising from keto-acidosis can occur, along with a host of side effects, including lack of energy, trouble with the bowels, loss of mental acuity, loss of salt which can disrupt electrolyte balance and lead to muscle cramping, etc. But, there is much more to the story, and evidence continually mounts against using a high fat, low carb diet long term. HEART DISEASE A recent interview in the Nutrition Action Newsletter with Dr. Frank Sacks, an internationally respected researcher from Harvard, provided an update on the impact of dietary saturated fat on heart disease risk. Regarding the totality of evidence to date, according to Sacks: “The evidence that saturated fat causes atherosclerosis and heart disease is compelling. Saturated fat increases LDL… and LDL is a cause of heart disease. It’s not a risk factor. It’s a direct absolute cause Continue reading >>

Blood Tests On Low Carb / Keto Diets Simplified

Blood Tests On Low Carb / Keto Diets Simplified

The lazy health nut’s guide to getting the most out of the least amount of blood letting possible. Disclaimer This is not medical advice, it is just the collation of the latest information we have on what’s actually useful to get tested for, and what it means in general. Seek out advice of doctors and specialists to interpret your own results, armed with the best information you can get. Shortcuts Overview One of the big problems with being conscious about your health and undertaking a low carb or even ketogenic regime is that you can start obsessing about plasma/lipid biomarkers etc, especially if you’re new to all this and still worried about silly little things like cholesterol etc. So the point of the information presented here is to simplify as much as possible for the average healthy’ish person who doesn’t want to stress about all the gazillions of tests and biomarkers that are specific to a limited subset of health maladies, but just wants a basic overview of the tests that tell you most of what you want to know. Most tests aren’t particularly telling on their own, but taken together several biomarkers are an indicator of where things are at, and if you are trying to diagnose a specific issue, you’ll need to research what other tests and results are of use to your situation. What we have identified here are the basic tests available from a regular lipid panel which by themselves can tell you fairly reliably where things are at for your overall health, and if you’re so inclined can investigate further with more complicated and expensive diagnostics. HbA1c Glycation/CVD/diabetes Triglycerides LDL particle density (CVD risk) ALT Fatty liver disease GGT Liver function Urate Kidney function Troponin Heart muscle damage The useful basic tests to get HbA Continue reading >>

Low Carb Paleo, And Ldl Is Soaring – Help!

Low Carb Paleo, And Ldl Is Soaring – Help!

To Kindy, Zach’s parents, and the NBIA/PKAN kids: I’ve been reading papers on the disease and trying to figure out the best diet for the disease. But the biochemistry is a bit complex, more complex than I realized last week, and I want to make sure my advice is sound. So I’m delaying my NBIA/PKAN/ketogenic diet posts until next week. My sincere apologies for the delay! I’m a little busy this week – busy with work, busy with learning about NBIA/PKAN, and eager to spend time with my brother who is visiting from Germany – and so I thought I’d do a “You be the doctor” quiz. Here’s the puzzle. Someone adopts a low-carb Paleo diet. Very healthy diet, right? But their LDL cholesterol level starts to rise. And rise. And rise. Larry Eshelman emailed me last December with this problem. His LDL history: 103 mg/dl (1990-2002, eating a low fat diet) 115 mg/dl (2002-2007, eating a low carb diet) 195 mg/dl (2007-2009, after reading Gary Taubes and adding saturated fat) 254 mg/dl (Dec 2009, very low-carb Paleo for 5 weeks) 295 mg/dl (Jun 2010, very low-carb Paleo for 7 months) (SI system readers, convert to mmol/l by dividing by 38.67.) A common problem This is not a terribly uncommon problem in the Paleo community; it afflicts famous and brilliant bloggers as well as ordinary folks. It’s been discussed by Richard Nikoley in several posts: Some examples of high LDL on a Paleo diet, with links – most of these provided to me by Larry (thanks Larry!): Jimmy Moore, 278 mg/dl (Nov 23, 2009) Peter Dobromylskyj, 261 mg/dl (Dec 31, 2007) Lightcan (commenter at Hyperlipid), 433 mg/dl (Nov 16, 2009), up from 109 in 2003 Lynn M. (commenter at Hyperlipid), LDL-P (particle number) 1458, 75% sdLDL but a zero calcium score (Aug 12, 2009) Mtflight (commenter at Hyperlipid), 201 Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Wrong and outdated health information often causes worry about the healthiness of the ketogenic diet. One of the biggest concerns is: does a ketogenic diet change your lipid profile? In order to tackle and address these concerns, we’ll be covering what lipid profile means, why it’s included in myths about the ketogenic diet and why you don’t need to worry about most of what you’ve been told. Lipids and the Ketogenic Diet The main purpose of the ketogenic diet today is to provide a measurable state of metabolism through nutritional ketosis. There are many benefits of ketosis, including weight loss, better mental clarity, and more energy. These benefits make the ketogenic diet enticing, but what about how it affects lipids in the body? To understand this, let’s discuss what lipids are and the beliefs surrounding them and the keto diet. What is a Lipid Profile? A lipid profile is the measure of fats and fatty substances (lipids) that your body uses as energy. These are usually measured via a lipid panel of blood tests meant to look for any irregularities in your lipid amounts. Lipids include: Triglycerides Cholesterol High-density lipoprotein (HDL, often know as “good,” cholesterol) Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, often known as “bad,” cholesterol) The ketogenic diet raises some concerns around the diet negatively affecting one’s lipid profile and increasing their risks of diseases related to high cholesterol or triglycerides. Let’s take a look at these concerns. Myths About Fat and Cholesterol Below are some of the myths when it comes to the ketogenic diet and lipid profiles. We’re used to hearing many of these due to bad or old science — and we all know the internet is rampant with poor (and sometimes harmful) information. Myth: Cholesterol is bad Continue reading >>

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients.

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat) in obese patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the present study, 83 obese patients (39 men and 44 women) with a body mass index greater than 35 kg/m(2), and high glucose and cholesterol levels were selected. The body weight, body mass index, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, urea and creatinine levels were determined before and after the administration of the ketogenic diet. Changes in these parameters were monitored after eight, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment. RESULTS: The weight and body mass index of the patients decreased significantly (P<0.0001). The level of total cholesterol decreased from week 1 to week 24. HDL cholesterol levels significantly increased, whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased after treatment. The level of triglycerides decreased significantly following 24 weeks of treatment. The level of blood glucose significantly decreased. The changes in the level of urea and creatinine were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administerin Continue reading >>

A Guide To High Cholesterol On A Keto Diet

A Guide To High Cholesterol On A Keto Diet

For most, a keto diet results in improved cholesterol values. But you might be one of the people whose LDL cholesterol has increased. Is that a problem? And if so – what can you do about it? Here’s a guide to this topic by dietician Franziska Spritzler: KetoDiet Blog: High cholesterol on a keto diet – Should you be concerned? If you want to learn more about elevated cholesterol on a keto diet, go to the links below. More Keto side effects: Elevated cholesterol Cholesterol Earlier Should you worry about your cholesterol on a keto diet? Did a citizen-scientist crack the cholesterol code? Continue reading >>

Can Weight Loss And Keto Cause Your Cholesterol Levels Go Up?

Can Weight Loss And Keto Cause Your Cholesterol Levels Go Up?

A low-carb ketogenic diet is known to improve your cholesterol levels and can be an incredibly healthy choice. In fact, we published an article before to explain how keto diet can lower your LDL cholesterol and triglycerides levels (1, 2, 3). However, there appears to be a very small number of people who experience increased cholesterol levels on a ketogenic diet during the first few months despite the weight loss. This could be just a temporary side effect. We will explain more and show you some studies we have found below. Difference between “good” HDL-cholesterol and “bad” LDL-cholesterol? Lipids are types of fats and the two most known types are triglycerides and cholesterol. Lipoproteins are the proteins which transfer the lipids in the bloodstream and handle their chemical reactions. High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol) is often called the “good” cholesterol that takes the excessive cholesterol from the blood to the liver for removal. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) is often called the “bad” cholesterol which transfers the cholesterol to the bloodstream to repair cells and also deposits cholesterol on the inside of artery walls. Total cholesterol is HDL and LDL cholesterol combined (4). Cholesterol Levels Might Increase While Losing Weight It is not uncommon for the cholesterol levels to increase temporarily in the first few months of the ketogenic diet. The reason is that weight loss can cause a temporary increase in cholesterol levels. When you lose fat weight, your body burns its stored fat and releases fatty acids into your bloodstream. This can cause an increase in your LDL cholesterol levels. This is usually only temporary. Cholesterol levels return to normal or even improve after the weight reduction h Continue reading >>

Lipid Changes On A Very-low-carb Ketogenic Diet: My Own Experience

Lipid Changes On A Very-low-carb Ketogenic Diet: My Own Experience

I'd like to preface this blog post by apologizing for its length, including links to several long articles. Also, for anyone who doesn't know me, I'm a vocal and enthusiastic supporter of low-carbohydrate diets, but I always strive to be balanced in my writing. I'm very nonconfrontational and don't like "getting into it" with people who disagree with me. However, I expect I'll receive plenty of negative feedback from this article because of the controversial topic. Cholesterol Results From June 2013 through November 2013 My cholesterol levels have always been higher than average. LDL has ranged from 120s-150s as far back as I can remember, long before I began following a moderately carbohydrate-restricted diet back in 2011. In June of last year, I reported my NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) LipoProfile results after almost a year of consuming a very-low-carb ketogenic diet (VLCKD) containing less than 50 grams net carb per day. I was very happy with these values and frankly a little surprised that I achieved them while eating delicious, satiating foods. Lipid Profile from November 2013 In November of last year, I had a standard lipid profile done as part of lab work for my annual physical: Total Cholesterol: 300 LDL-C: 160 HDL-C: 128 TG: 56 My numbers had increased, but I wasn't terribly concerned about the LDL-C, since on a few occasions it had been nearly that high in the past. Seeing a total cholesterol of 300 was a bit troubling, but I knew it was partially due to having extremely high HDL (Apparently high levels of some types of HDL can also be problematic, although I didn't realize this at the time). Looking back, although I wasn't tracking my intake online regularly back then, I'm pretty sure I was eating the same or perhaps a little more fat than when I had the Continue reading >>

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Cholesterol

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Cholesterol

What happens to your cholesterol when you eat high-fat, keto? Jimmy Moore and I review my 9 month cholesterol numbers since going low-carb, high-fat, keto. I’ve been following a high-fat, low-carb, keto eating style for 9 months (as outlined in my 30-day keto program) and my blood test results are in! Today; with the help of Jimmy Moore, we’re reviewing my results and chatting about what eating high-fat, low-carb, keto does to your cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides. AND! We show you how to interpret the results of your blood tests, the cholesterol numbers you should watch for, foods that put you at risk, the connection between triglycerides and carb intake, and how to change your numbers for the better. If you’re curious about cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, today’s video will give you the full picture so that you can make a healthful, informed decision about yourself, your health and your high-fat, keto life. Highlights… What eating “high-fat” or “keto” did to my cholesterol (HDL, LDL and triglycerides) What cholesterol numbers to watch for The food your body needs to increase your HDL The connection between carb intake and triglycerides What eating high-fat, keto does to your cholesterol numbers Resources… Get Jimmy’s Book, Cholesterol Clarity My 30-day Meal Plan + High-Fat, Keto Guidebook, The Keto Beginning VIDEO TRANSCRIPTION Leanne: Jimmy, you’re here in the flesh. Jimmy Moore: Hey, hey, hey. Leanne: For those of you guys who don’t know Jimmy Moore, first of all you’ve probably been living under a rock because this guy’s huge. Excited to have you here on the show today. Jimmy busted on health scene in 2004 after a phenomenal 180 pound weight loss that enabled him to come off of his prescription drugs for high cholesterol, Continue reading >>

Why Ldl-cholesterol May Be Overestimated On A Low-carb, High-fat (lchf) Diet

Why Ldl-cholesterol May Be Overestimated On A Low-carb, High-fat (lchf) Diet

Elevated LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) is common among people who adopt a low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) lifestyle. That’s why many physicians and nutritionists remain doubtful when it comes to LCHF, despite overwhelming evidence that such a dietary approach improves several other lipid parameters, usually leads to weight loss and positively affects glucose metabolism. Several studies have shown that LDL-C constitutes a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (1). Lowering LDL-C is considered a major target for reducing risk. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Associated advocate statin treatment for individuals with LDL-C above 190 mg/dL (4.9 mmol/L). However, LDL-C is not a reliable risk marker for everyone. The main reason is that it is usually not measured in the laboratory. Although direct measurements are available, they are seldom performed due to costs. A standard lipid profile measures total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG)(2), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C)(3). LDL-C is indirectly estimated from these variables. The bulk of cholesterol in the blood is carried by three lipoproteins, LDL, HDL and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). Other lipoproteins carry a negligible amount. Hence, if we subtract the cholesterol carried by HDL and VLDL from the total cholesterol, we will have an estimation of LDL-C. HDL-C is available from the standard lipid panel, so that’s not a problem. But, how can we estimate VLDL-C? VLDL is an important carrier for TG’s in the blood. Although it also carries cholesterol, it is usually classified as a TG-rich lipoprotein. The ratio of the mass of TG to that of cholesterol in VLDL appears to be relatively constant and about 5:1 in healthy subjects. So, if we subtract the HDL-C mass and Continue reading >>

High Cholesterol Meets Ketosis: An Update

High Cholesterol Meets Ketosis: An Update

A couple of years ago I started using the ketogenic diet to manage my blood sugar as a type 1 diabetic and to enhance my athletic performance. I wrote a series of blogs and an ebook to share that experiment because adopting a low carb high fat (ketogenic) diet has become the single most beneficial thing that I’ve done for my diabetes management and my ability to be active in the 20 years I’ve been living at this difficult metabolic crossroads. Eating ketogenic has improved my life and my ability to make photography, climbing and moving around in the outdoors the center of my life rather than fleeing the complications of diabetes. I didn’t expect those posts to take off because I’m not a dietary blogger. I just wanted to share the ups and downs of what I was trying in hopes that it would help other people. One of the major issues I encountered was the sharp increase in my LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and initially I considered abandoning the ketogenic diet because I feared that I was just trading one risk factor for another. If you want to read that post and the comment thread check it out here! I am writing this post to update you since two years have passed and I have found some information that I believe is useful. I also want to clarify my current position on the cholesterol issue and why my LDL is still high and why I’m not letting that fact deter me from eating ketogenic. In fact, I am going to share a couple more blog posts in the future detailing some new experiments I’ve been doing using intermittent fasting and exogenous ketones which has been nothing short of mind-blowing! Exhibit A: Biohacker’s Lab podcast (non-iTunes) or Biohacker’s Lab (iTunes) : Ep8: High Cholesterol Levels on a Keto Diet Experiments by Dave Feldman If you have concerns abou Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

A common misconception is that because ketogenic diets are high in fat, they must increase cholesterol in your body and clog your arteries. However, much of the recent research shines light on how low-carb diets can optimize your cholesterol levels and in fact improve your heart health. Here we show the most up-to-date research on how different types of cholesterol impact the body and how the ketogenic diet can be a useful tool in maintaining a robust cardiovascular system. Cutting through the Fat: What are Lipids and Cholesterol? Before we can examine the research, we need to understand the roles fat, cholesterol, and carrier molecules called lipoproteins play in the body. Fats, also known as lipids, are a diverse group of molecules with a “non-polar” characteristic that repels water. This means that you if you put a fat such as oil or grease in water they will not mix. In the human body, fats are most commonly found in the bloodstream in one of two forms. The first is triglycerides, a fatty acid that stores energy for later use. These long molecules can be broken down into other fatty acids and glycerol to create fuel for the body. Glycerol can further be broken down into forms of glucose. Elevated levels of triglycerides in your blood can increase your risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular illnesses, and other life-threatening diseases. [1] The other important class of lipids in the body is a waxy substance called cholesterol. These molecules have a variety of functions in your body such as building hormones including estrogen and testosterone, maintaining the integrity of cell membranes, and aiding in the absorption of vitamins. Your body produces all the cholesterol you need through the liver and other body cells. Cholesterol is also obtained by consuming Continue reading >>

The Causes Of Coronary Heart Disease

The Causes Of Coronary Heart Disease

If you ask a doctor or other health professional about causes of coronary heart disease, you'll most likely get an answer mentioning one or all of these factors: too much saturated fat in the diet (eating too much butter, red meat and other animal based, cholesterol containing foods) high cholesterol levels high LDL cholesterol levels patient has diabetes, which is strongly linked to heart disease. The main belief of most physicians is that saturated fat and cholesterol cause clogged arteries, which leads to coronary heart disease. This idea is what researchers call the Diet-Heart Hypothesis. There's a slight problem though. When you look at the actual research data, these factors DON'T have strong correlations with the development of heart disease. All of the negative information about cholesterol you've been told is incorrect. The cholesterol information that is true is a much different story. In fact, cholesterol levels in the blood and saturated fat in the diet have NO effect on heart disease. This has been confirmed in several studies. Despite spending millions of dollars, research organizations in the US have never been able to establish a link between cholesterol levels, saturated fat intake and heart disease. High LDL cholesterol has some correlation, but only when the LDL particles are the small, dense, oxidized kind. Saturated Fat Let's look at saturated fat, the source of cholesterol, first. In this meta analysis published in 2010, Krauss et al concluded that "a meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies showed that there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of CHD (coronary heart diease) or CVD (coronary vascular disease)." And in this paper, Krauss et al wrote that REDUCING saturat Continue reading >>

Ldl Is Your Friend

Ldl Is Your Friend

LDL or low density lipoprotein has been given a bad rap. Ever since someone decided to call it “bad cholesterol” it has been demonized as being responsible for just about everything bad in the world. Medical doctors and cardiologists in specific have joined the crusade against LDL with a pervasive mentality that somehow the lower the blood value of LDL, the better. Fortunately, the justification for this altruism is unjustified. So let’s take a step back for a moment and review just exactly what LDL is and does, and then I’ll move on and explain why the notion of it being something to fear is ill founded. LDL is what we call a carrier protein, and one of its important jobs is to carry a fundamentally important chemical to every cell in the body. This chemical is a critical component of cell membranes, serves as a brain antioxidant, and is the raw material from which your body manufactures vitamin D, cortisol, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. And this important, life-sustaining chemical is cholesterol. So the notion that LDL is “bad cholesterol” is flawed on two counts. First, it is, in and of itself, not cholesterol, it is a protein. Second, now that you’ve embraced all of its functions in human physiology, it’s clear that LDL is anything but bad. How could we castigate a part of our biochemistry so fundamental for life? LDL plays a particularly important role in brain health and function as you would expect based on the information above. In fact, you might expect that low levels of LDL might well be associated with compromise of brain tissue, and you would be right. Earlier this month, researchers publishing in the prestigious journal, Neurology, designed a study to explore possible correlations between various markers of blood fats and risk f Continue reading >>

What Impact Can A Ketogenic Diet Have On Cholesterol?

What Impact Can A Ketogenic Diet Have On Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a class of lipids (or fats) in the body. It is a waxy substance that has a variety of functions such as building hormones (estrogen and testosterone), maintaining the integrity of cell membranes, and aiding in the absorption of vitamins (fat soluble vitamins). Your body gets all the cholesterol needed through internal production from the liver and various other cells of the body (75%) or from dietary sources (25%) (1). Cholesterol is transported in the blood by molecules known as lipoproteins which are composed of fat and protein. Most are familiar with them, as they are what is reported for our health measures…. HDL, LDL, etc. Lipoproteins 101 (Cholesterol) High Density Lipoproteins (HDL), also referred to as “good cholesterol” have two main functions: 1. Transporting cholesterol around the body 2. Collecting cholesterol that is not being used by cells and brings them back to the liver to be recycled or destroyed. As a result, HDL prevents clogging and accumulation of cholesterol in the arteries. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) also transports cholesterol produced by the liver and cells throughout the body; however, LDL molecules move slower and are vulnerable to being oxidized. When they are oxidized, these molecules can impede cardiovascular function by burrowing into the walls of the arteries. Thus, they get a bad rap and are often referred to as “bad cholesterol”. Even more damaging can be lipoproteins called very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). These particles transport triglycerides in the body, and are more likely than other lipoproteins to clog vessels and impair cardiovascular functions. What is The Impact of a Ketogenic Diet on Lipoprotein Levels? Research suggests that a low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet may have a clinically-positive Continue reading >>

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