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Keto Goddess Pronunciation

Introductory Hekate Faq

Introductory Hekate Faq

Introductory Hekate F. A. Q. 1. How do I start? I recommend starting simple. Write a basic prayer to Her, light a candle or some incense. Recite the prayer. Sit in silence afterwards. Allow the practice to grow. Items for your altar will be found, new practices will come to your attention. As you are able, pick up books on Hekate, as well as books on the Ancient Greeks and Romans, and take your time. A spiritual life is not a race to the finish; there is no end. 2. What books would you recommend? I’ll offer up three of varying intensity and approach. You will find a more extensive bibliography at the end of this FAQ. Sorita D'Este’s Hekate: Liminal Rites offers a gloss of history, along with some personal accounts, as well as a selection of recipes. Tara Sanchez’s Temple of Hekate is a workbook that guides the practitioner through a series of rites that can build a relationship with the Keybearing Queen. Sarah Iles Johnston’s Hekate Soteira proffers the academic discussion of Hekate as She came to be understood in the Hellenistic era, as well as a brief discussion of Her earlier roles in the Mediterranean world. 3. I’m scared Hekate will curse me! Seems unlikely. My experiences have led me to understand Hekate as being an understanding sort, though She does expect Her devotees to uphold their promises to Her. She gets typecast as being far more grim than She is by some modern practitioners. Some others opt instead to castrate Her of Her more difficult aspects. The truth is somewhere in between. 4. What to do when you feel disconnected from Hekate? Honestly? There’s nothing wrong with taking a break. Most likely, you’ll find your feeling overwhelmed with some other part of your life. I am dealing with this of late myself, to a small extent. I’ve been pret Continue reading >>

Kerigo To Kleomenes I

Kerigo To Kleomenes I

The Kerkopes were two Monkey-Men named Passalus and Akmon (Acmon). As Herakles (Heracles) was sleeping under a tree, the two mischievous characters stole his bow; Herakles caught the barbaric looking brothers and tied them upside-down to a pole which he carried over his shoulder; the Kerkopes were not only unrepentant but highly amused by their plight and, as they dangled behind Herakles, they began making disparaging comments about Herakles’ hairy posterior; Herakles, who was so accustomed to sorrow and brutality, couldn’t resist the infectious good humor of the Kerkopes and set them free. Herakles’ encounter with the Kerkopes was a popular artistic theme beginning in the early sixth century BCE and continuing well into the fourth century; the story was popular from mainland Greece to the island of Sicily. This story is one of the fragmentary remains of the Epic Cycle; for the complete translations of the Epic Cycle I recommend the Loeb Classical Library volume 57, ISBN 0674990633; you can sometimes find this book at the library or you can order it from the Book Shop on this site which is linked to Amazon.com. Continue reading >>

From Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia

For other uses, see Ceto (disambiguation). For minor planet, see 65489 Ceto. Ceto (/ˈsiːtoʊ/; Ancient Greek: Κητώ, Kētō, "sea monster"), is a primordial sea goddess in Greek mythology, the daughter of Gaia and Pontus. As a mythological figure, she is most notable for bearing by Phorcys a host of monstrous children. The small solar system body 65489 Ceto was named after her, and its satellite after Phorcys. Ceto was also variously called Crataeis[citation needed] (Κράταιις, Krataiis, from κραταιίς "mighty") and Trienus[citation needed] (Τρίενος, Trienos, from τρίενος "within three years"), and was occasionally conflated by scholars with the goddess Hecate (for whom Crataeis and Trienus are also epithets). This goddess should not be confused with the minor Oceanid also named Ceto, or with various mythological beings referred to as ketos (plural ketea); this is a general term for "sea monster" in Ancient Greek.[1] Ceto in ancient texts[edit] The goddess Ceto aiding her father Pontus in the mythological war known as the Gigantomachy — c. 166–156 BC — Gigantomachy Frieze, Pergamon Altar of Zeus Hesiod's Theogony lists the children of Phorcys and Ceto as Echidna, The Gorgons (Euryale, Stheno, and the infamous Medusa), The Graeae (Deino, Enyo, Pemphredo, and sometimes Perso), and Ladon, also called the Drakon Hesperios ("Hesperian Dragon", or dragon of the Hesperides). These children tend to be consistent across sources, though Ladon is sometimes cited as a child of Echidna by Typhon and therefore Phorcys and Ceto's grandson. The Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius cites Phorcys and Ceto as the parents of the Hesperides, but this assertion is not repeated in other ancient sources. Homer refers to Thoosa, the mother of Polyphemus in The Continue reading >>

Ancient Greek Gods

Ancient Greek Gods

Name Description/(Keywords) Roman Name Aphrodite Aphrodite, the golden goddess of Love; born of the blood of Ouranos (the Heavens) and the foam of the sea. (Aphrodite, Venus) Venus Apollon Apollon, the son of Zeus and Leto; the brother of Artemis. (Apollo, Apollon, Phoibos Apollon, the Striker from Afar) Apollo Ares Ares, the god of War; the son of Zeus and Hera. (Ares, Aries, Mars, God of War) Mars Artemis Artemis, Diana (Artemis, Diana) Diana Athene (Athena) Athene, the goddess of Wisdom; the daughter of Zeus and Metis; the virgin goddess of intellect and invention. (Athene, Athena, Pallas Athene, Tritogeneia, Glaukopis, Minerva) Minerva Demeter Demeter, the goddess of the Harvest; the daughter of Kronos (Cronos) and Rheia (Rhea). (Demeter, Ceres) Ceres Dione Dione, the Mother Goddess of MountOlympos (Olympus). (Dione) Eos Eos, the Dawn; mother of the Winds. (Dawn, Eos, Erigeneia) Enyo Enyo, one of the Graiai (the Gray Sisters); the daughters of Keto (Ceto) and Phorkys (Phorcys). (Enyo, Bellona, Gray Sisters, Graiai) Bellona Erida Erida, the wearisome goddess of Hate. (Erida, Hate) Erinyes Erinys, the Mist-Walking and the Kindly One; punisher of the unfaithful. (Erinyes, Erinys, Furiae, Furies, Tisiphone, Megaera, Alecto, Alekto) Furiae Eris Eris, the goddess of Discord and Strife. (Eris, Discordia, Discord) Discordia Eros Eros, the primal god of Love; using arrows of gold and lead, he would wound the hearts of mortals and Immortals alike. (Eros, Cupid) Cupid Eurynome Eurynome, one of the many daughters of Ocean; the mother of the Graces. (Eurynome) Fates The Fates, the Daughters of Necessity; born of Zeus and Themis. (Fates, Morae, Clotho, Lachesis, Atropos, Klotho, Lakhesis, Moiras, Keras, Moirai, Moira) Morae Gorgons Gorgons, the daughters of Phorkys and Keto (Ceto Continue reading >>

Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology

The daughter of GAIA and PONTUS, she’s a monstrous sea creature who loves nothing better than an exciting shipwreck. CETO is married to her brother, the old salt PHORCYS, with whom she spawned the GORGONS, SCYLLA, the GRAEAE and other nasties. Practically all sea monsters come from her. Name : CETO Pronunciation : Coming soon Alternative names : KETO Location : Ancient Greece Gender : Female Type : deity In charge of : the Ocean God of : Sea, Seas, Ocean, Oceans Celebration or Feast Day : Unknown at present Good/Evil Rating : Unknown at present Popularity index : 26610 Continue reading >>

Transliteration And English Accentuation Of Ancient Greek Mythological Names

Transliteration And English Accentuation Of Ancient Greek Mythological Names

Alphabet and Pronunciation The majuscule (uncial, capital, or upper-case) letters of the ancient Greek alphabet, the minuscule (small or lower-case) letters, and their pronunciations are: Letter Pronunciation Α, α (alpha) father, calm Β, β (beta) be Γ, γ (gamma) go; but nasal before a guttural [ŋ]* Δ, δ (delta) do Ε, ε (epsilon) let, epigram Ζ, ζ (zeta) glaz’d, or adze Η, η (eta) French fête, or paper Θ, θ (theta) thin Ι, ι (iota) geranium (when short), police (when long) Κ, κ (kappa) kinetic Λ, λ (lambda) land Μ, μ (mu) man Ν, ν (nu) now Ξ, ξ (xi) axium, wax Ο, ο (omicron) obey (short o) Π, π (pi) pet Ρ, ρ (rho) roof (trilled r) Σ, σ/ς (sigma) sit Τ, τ (tau) tell Υ, υ (upsilon) French u, German ü Φ, φ (phi) graphic Χ, χ (chi) Scotch loch, German machen Ψ, ψ (psi) gypsum, eclipse Ω, ω (omega) ode, tone (long o) ἄγγελος angelos ἄγκυρα ankyra λάρυγξ larynx ἄγχουσα anchusa The Latin alphabet (i.e., the alphabet devised by ancient Romans for writing in the ancient Latin language) arose by Roman adaptation of the earlier Greek alphabet. For each single character in Greek, the Romans adopted one or more characters for their own Latin alphabet, and the important correspondences for the present purpose are as follows: Greek Latin Α (alpha) A Β (beta) B Γ (gamma) G Δ (delta) D Ε (epsilon) E Ζ (zeta) Z Η (eta) E Θ (theta) TH Ι (iota) I Κ (kappa) C (Note well!) Λ (lambda) L Μ (mu) M Ν (nu) N Ξ (xi) X Ο (omicron) O Π (pi) P Ρ (rho) RH (word-initial) R (medial or final) Σ (sigma) S Τ (tau) T Υ (upsilon) Y Φ (phi) PH Χ (chi) CH Ψ (psi) PS Ω (omega) O Observe that in some instances the Romans used one and the same letter for more than one Greek letter (thus Latin E for both Greek Continue reading >>

Classical Literature Quotes

Classical Literature Quotes

KETO (Ceto) was the goddess of the dangers of the sea and, more specifically, of sea-monsters, whales and large sharks (all called ketea in Greek). She consorted with her brother Phorkys (Phorcys) to produced a brood of fearsome monsters including--the she-dragon Ekhidna (viper), sailor-devouring Skylla (crab), the hundred-headed serpent Ladon, the one-eyed Graiai (grey ones), and the petrifying Gorgones (terrible ones). As the mother of Skylla Keto was also named (Crataeis, of the Rocks), Lamia (the Shark) and Trienos (the Thrice). The last title appears to equate her with the thrice-swallowing whirlpool-monster Kharybdis (Charybdis). Krataiis was also identified or confused with the goddess Hekate (Hecate), a divinity whose power extended over the sea. There was also a river named Krataiis in the territory of the Brutti, near the Straits of Messina in Italy. FAMILY OF CETO PARENTS OFFSPRING OF KETO [1.1] THE GORGONES, THE GRAIA, EKHIDNA, DRAKON HESPERIOS (by Phorkys) (Hesiod Theogony 270) [1.2] THE GORGONES, THE GRAIA (by Phorkys) (Apollodorus 1.10) [1.3] THE GRAIA (by Phorkys) (Hyginus Preface) [1.4] THE GORGONES (by Gorgo) (Hyginus Preface) OFFSPRING OF KRATAIIS [1.1] SKYLLA (by Phorkys) (Apollodorus E7.20, Apollonius Rhodius 4.828) [1.2] SKYLLA (Homer Odyssey 12.125, Hyginus Fabulae 199) ENCYCLOPEDIA CRATAEIS (Krataiïs), according to several traditions, the mother of Scylla. (Hom. Od. xii. 124; Ov. Met. xiii. 749; Hesych. s. v. ; Plin. H. N. iii. 10.) Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. ALTERNATE NAMES CLASSICAL LITERATURE QUOTES Hesiod, Theogony 233 ff (trans. Evelyn-White) (Greek epic C8th or C7th B.C.) : "And Pontos (Pontus, the Sea) begat Nereus . . . And Pontos again fathered great Thaumas and proud Phorkys (Phorcys), being mated wi Continue reading >>

Greek Names Pronunciation Guide

Greek Names Pronunciation Guide

Love The Gatekeeper's Saga but aren't sure how to pronounce a lot of the names of the gods and places? Here's a handy Greek names pronunciation guide created by the narrator of the audiobook editions of the Gatekeeper books, Debbie Andreen. You can learn more about Debbie at her Facebook Page. Achaeans Acheron Achilles Acteon Adgistis Admetus Adrasteia Aeneas Aeolus Aiakos Algaea Alecto Algaia Amphisbaena Amphitrite Anteros Antiope Aphrodite Apollo Apotheosis Arcas Ares Arges Ariadne Arion Aristaios Artemis Ascalaphus Asklepios Asphodel Asterion Athena Atlas Atropos Augean Stables Baqlawa Boracay Boreas Bosporus Briareos Brontes Cerberus Charon Charybdis Chione Chiron Chrysaor Clotho Cocytus Cronos Cubie Curetes Cyclopes Cybele Daedalus Deimos Deity Delos Demeter Dione Dionysus Echidna Eirene Enyalios Enyo Eos Erebus Eris Eros Eunomia Euphrosyne Eurydice Eurynome Gaia Galin Geryon Hades Harmonia Hecate Hecuba Helios Hephaestus Hera Heracles Heraklion Hermaphroditus Hermes Hesiod Hesperides Hestia Hippolyta Hydra Hypnos Ida Iolaus Kaveh Grahib Ketamine Keto Kithairon, Mount Knossos Lachesis Ladon Laodice Lethe Leto Litohoro Maenads Matapan, Cape Majorelle Gardens Medusa Megaera Melinoe Metis Minos Minotaur Mont Forel Mytikas Nereids Oceanid Odysseus Orpheus Palaistra Papasan chair Pasithea Pelops Perins Peak Persephone Philotes Phlegethon Phorcys Polyhymnia Polyphemus Poseidon Priam Prometheus Rhadamanthys Rhea Rhode Sahin Satyrs Scylla Scythe Selene Semele Sisyphus Steropes Stymphalus Styx Tartarus Thalia Thanatos Theseus Thetis Thrace Thyrsus Tiresias Tisiphone Tyche Uranus Wight Zeus Continue reading >>

What Is Echidna?

What Is Echidna?

Fast Facts: What Is Echidna? Echidna is a guardian, goddess, monster, or mother of the sprits that are the alternative to the Olympians, dependent on the source. Regardless of how one views her, as the mother of many of the creatures that Heracles was tasked with killing, her importance to the Greeks is without question. Origin Echidna was the daughter of either Gaia and Tartarus, or Keto and Phorkys. Either way, the cave birth of this half-woman, half-serpent would herald a new age in the Greek pantheon, an age in which the birth of her children would present to her the title of “Mother of All Monsters.” Family Echidna was married to Typhon who, if her parents were Gaia and Tartarus, was her full brother. Perhaps this would explain the countenance of all of their children together. If her parents were Keto and Phorkys, then perhaps her countenance can be explained as a combination of the features of her beautiful mother, and the monstrous features of her father. Like Echidna, Phorkys’ upper body was humanoid, while his lower half was not. But instead of being a snake, his lower half was that of a fish. His upper half was not handsome, however, but rather covered in crablike skin. Regardless of her parentage, as the Mother of All Monsters, Echidna’s children with Typhon would figure prominently in the tales of nearly every great hero of Greek mythology. History Most of Echidna’s history centers not around her, but rather on her famous children. Her title of Mother of All Monsters is well deserved. Her husband, like Echidna herself, was also half-humanoid and half-snake. Their children, however, were dominated by their monstrous sides. Many Heroes, Many Deaths One can presume that Echidna has no love lost for any of the great heroes of Greek mythology. Most of Continue reading >>

Teutonic Deity

Teutonic Deity

Type of: deity, divinity, god, immortal any supernatural being worshipped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force Continue reading >>

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