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Keto Gave Me A Heart Attack

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Can A Low-carb Diet Help Prevent A Heart Attack?

Can A Low-carb Diet Help Prevent A Heart Attack?

Conventional advice says one of the best ways to help your heart (and your waistline) is to stay away from fatty foods like red meat. But according to a new study, the opposite might actually be true. New research published in the journal PLOS ONE found that focusing on reducing your carbohydrate intake is actually better for your health than just trying to stay away from fat. In fact, when researchers looked at 17 randomized studies of overweight people, they found that a high-fat, low-carb diet was 98 percent more likely to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke than skimping on fat in favor of carbs. (Learn more about The Truth About the Low-Carb High-Fat Diet.) But the perks went beyond heart health: Participants on the low-carb diet (consuming less than 120 grams a day) were 99 percent more likely to lose weight than those avoiding fats (making up less than 30 percent of their daily calories). Those are tough numbers to argue with! On average, the low-carb dieters lost about five pounds more than their low-fat counterparts. (Find out Why Women Need Fat.) Researchers aren't exactly sure why reducing carbs in favor of avoiding fat lowered the risk of heart attack and stroke, but they think it probably has more to do with fewer carbs and less to do with more fat. As for the weight loss, the reason why is pretty simple, says study author Jonathan Sackner-Bernstein, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University. While carbs are great for spiking short-term energy levels, they also cause your body to produce a ton of insulin—a hormone that regulates how our bodies use or store glucose and fat. When you eat a ton of carbs, your body releases insulin rapidly, essentially telling your body that it needs to store extra fuel for later, leading you to pack Continue reading >>

How To Avoid A Heart Attack While Doing A Ketogenic (or Any Other) Diet

How To Avoid A Heart Attack While Doing A Ketogenic (or Any Other) Diet

One of the biggest questions that anyone asks in relation to a high fat diet is this: “will eating a high fat diet cause heart disease.” And this is where everyone starts to lose their minds. On one side, we have the lipid hypothesis, which points at fat as the main cause of heart disease while ignoring every other possible hypothesis and every study that demonstrates that there is not a relationship between fat intake and heart disease all while tapping its finger on its Ivy League medical diploma. On the other side we have the low carb high fat cult that argues for high fat intake as if it is some verse from the bible. In the minds of these people, carbohydrate in all of its forms is the devil and they point their fingers and laugh at the non converted as if they are on a one way road to high blood sugar hell. Very few have ever tried to meet in the middle. Now, I’m obviously someone who believes in the benefits of a high fat diet. I helped create a course called Keto Camp for God’s sake. But I also think that this madness needs to stop. We are doing nothing but talking past each other. This is not me saying that the lipid hypothesis isn’t wrong. Evidence in recent years has consistently pointed to the fact that there is no relationship between fat intake and heart disease in both epidemiological and human subject studies. Evidence has also demonstrated that a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can help athletes to perform as well or better than they would on a high carb low fat diet. But what I am saying is this: there are other paths to healthy living besides a ketogenic diet, and there is a right way and a wrong way to do a ketogenic diet, and if done the wrong way, the ketogenic diet can be very unhealthy. So here are four ways to ensure that your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Following A Ketogenic Diet Without A Gallbladder

Following A Ketogenic Diet Without A Gallbladder

Since the 1920s, ketogenic diets have been used as a therapeutic method to treat obesity, epilepsy, diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer and many other pathological diseases (1). This very low carbohydrate diet that combines moderate protein consumption with high amounts of quality fats puts the body into a state of fat or ketone adaptation. Following a ketogenic diet without a gallbladder can pose complications because of the body’s inability to adequately secrete bile to break down fatty meals. Fortunately, these 7 strategies will answer your concerns for maintaining ketosis without a gallbladder. What Is Ketosis? When net carbohydrate consumption remains less than 50 g/day (in some cases under 30g/day), insulin concentration reduces and the body begins using stored fat for energy via lipogenesis (1). Following 3 to 4 days of this dietary carbohydrate restriction, the central nervous system (CNS) has an inadequate supply of glucose and must seek other fuel. The alternate energy source the CNS seeks along with tissues and organs is ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are produced at high concentrations in the liver during the metabolic state of ketogenesis which is also attainable during periods of prolonged fasting. The 3 major ketone bodies include acetate, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. Ketosis results in numerous health promoting benefits including: (1) Decreased fatty acid production Increased metabolism of fats and lipids Higher metabolic rate to use ketone bodies Improved mitochondrial function Modified satiety hormones including ghrelin and leptin Regulates blood lipid levels including triglycerides and cholesterol Reduced insulin signaling Improved glycemic control Reduced whole body inflammatory levels Is a Ketogenic Diet Right for You? When nutr Continue reading >>

I Was Scared Of Dropping Dead Of A Heart Attack At Any Moment

I Was Scared Of Dropping Dead Of A Heart Attack At Any Moment

The High School Football Player I have struggled with my eating habits for most of my life. My problem was that early on, I didn’t really realize that my habits were bad. I played sports while growing up and transitioned to strictly football throughout my high school and college days. I was an offensive lineman, you know, one of the guys that carry the nickname of the “fat boys” or the “hogs”. I didn’t think much about it at the time and it was paying for school so I didn’t care. Things changed after a knee injury ended my career and I found myself depressed and no longer living an active lifestyle. I continued the eating habits of my playing days but was no longer burning those extra calories off. Instead, they were being converted to triglycerides and stored up for “later” use. Fast forward a few years and fluctuations between weights because of different diets and here we are. Back in August I finally decided it was time for change. I awoke on the morning of August 15th with my mind made up; it was time to turn my health around. Back in May I weighed 330 and I was expecting things to be even worse on this particular morning. To my surprise, or should I say horror, the scales said I was down to 315 pounds. I immediately knew what was going on and called my dad and told him I would be by at lunch to borrow his glucose meter. Lunch time rolls around and my fasting glucose reads a whopping 175 mg/dl, 75 points higher than what is considered to be normal! I called and scheduled an appointment for the following Wednesday with my family doc for blood work and a check up. The evening after my appointment, I received a phone call from my doctor himself. When your doctor is actually making the phone call, it usually lets you know that something is wrong. His Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Coffee Is Not For The Faint Of Heart

Bulletproof Coffee Is Not For The Faint Of Heart

The health and performance enhancing credentials of bulletproof coffee, a.k.a. butter coffee, are impressive. But it's not a concoction to fuck around with—the blend of a strong caffeine hit and saturated fats can have quite the effect on your insides. Charlie Norton Jun 2 2014, 4:33pm Foto von thedabblist via Flickr It's mid-morning on a busy day when hunger pangs usually set in and lunch is still but a distant dot on the horizon. But today is different. I'm strangely fortified with a feeling of satiety. I'm brimming with purposeful energy and my conscious brain has a sharp sheen, keeping me focused. What's more is that I ate no discernible solid for breakfast. Rather, a veritable slick of strong coffee lathered with a heaped tablespoon of butter—the kind of breakfast that Withnail might have cobbled together with leftovers after a big night. Advertisement This was premeditated, though. I had drunk a mug full of bulletproof coffee (also known as butter coffee), an old world tradition that has re-emerged as a potent performance enhancer. The term was coined by American health guru Dave Asprey, who has harnessed his experience of drinking yak tea with butter at 18,000 feet in Tibet (it gave him astounding energy levels) into this turbo coffee. Mingma Tseri Sherpa, one of the world's leading mountaineers and 19-time Everest summiter, tells me, "We often drink tea with yak butter and salt. It's good for our health and we mostly drink it during winter. It's very common fuel for sherpas and climbing." RELATED: How To Make Perfect Pour Over Coffee This isn't about spooning any old butter into any old coffee, though. Margarine and instant coffee won't cut it. With bulletproof coffee, the quality of the ingredients is paramount. The coffee must be the lowest toxin and most Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Heart Failure

Ketogenic Diet And Heart Failure

1 In some cases, yes: Aaron, There are some very small studies that suggest that ketogenic diets may increase the risk of arrhythmia in children with epilepsy by increasing the QT interval on the ECG. There are no large studies of good quality that I am aware of that ...Read more 2 4 6 9 I'm taking a percription diet pill call phintermine which is the generic brand of adapex. I've had success with this med but I'm worried about possible heart failure in the future. My heart looks good now and my doctor has no concern with me taking it. Sh 10 Complex genetics: Recommendations on gene mutations are best given by a medical geneticist, who needs a detailed understanding of the exact test that you had done and the detailed results. Many gene mutations cause a loss of function so you don't necessarily want to turn off the mutated gene. Modern genetics is discovering many genetic markers that convey only ...Read more 11 19 24 27 28 30 36 Continue reading >>

Did A Statin Increase My Chance Of A Heart Attack?

Did A Statin Increase My Chance Of A Heart Attack?

I’m going to tell you a horror story. It’s a bit long, and has plenty of twists and turns, but I assure you it ends with a happy resolution. I’m not a doctor, or a biochemist, I am just a computer programmer (with a few undergrad biochem credits) who got sick, and doctors couldn’t really help me get better … so I determined to debug my deranged metabolism in much the same way I would a misbehaving computer program. These days I do a podcast with another computer programmer ( 2ketodudes podcast ) where we talk about Diabetes and ketogenic diets. But in 2004 I was first diagnosed as pre-diabetic. I had started an Atkins style low carb, high protein moderate fat diet to stave off type 2 Diabetes. My LDL cholesterol was a high normal 170 mg/dl. BTW: I’m going to use US style units as most of my audience is American but for Aussies who can do the math – Cholesterol mg/dl -> mmol/l just divide by 38 – Triglycerides mg/dl -> mmol/l divide by 88. My LDL “Cholesterol” had slowly increased to 208 mg/dl (5.4mmol/l). That wasn’t necessarily related to the diet (which at that point was more like lazy atkins) but probably a genetic propensity for higher than average “cholesterol” and age. I’m going to show you a sequence of 7 blood tests over 4 years to show how I fixed and then broke and then fixed myself again. For this story I’ll focus on the amount of LDL-C in mg/dl (that’s cholesterol in Low Density Lipoproteins which you might know as “Bad Cholesterol”), %HbA1c which is a rough average measurement of my blood glucose, my Triglycerides in mg/dl (that’s the fat made by my liver from carbohydrates), and my HDL in mg/dl (the “good” cholesterol). So In 2011 I was pretty healthy, a little overweight but riding 30-50km a week, working out at a Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Will Keto Help My Heart Or Give Me A Heart Attack?

Ketogenic Diet: Will Keto Help My Heart Or Give Me A Heart Attack?

Here’s the formula EXAMPLE Your WEIGHT ( 300 pounds ) multiply by 14. = ( 4,200 calories ) That will get you your TOTAL MAINTENANCE CALORIES. Then. Your MAINTENANCE CALORIE multiply by .25 4,200 calories x .25 = 1,050 Then. Your MAINTENANCE CALORIE 4,200 subtract 1,050 = 3,150 calories. – 3,150 would be your calorie goal – Depending on your workout intensity and job you can lower the deficit % the harder you work the more your body needs! Now just plug in your weight and try it yourself ! Continue reading >>

8 Common Misconceptions About Ketogenic Diets

8 Common Misconceptions About Ketogenic Diets

8 Common Misconceptions About Ketogenic Diets Trashing ketogenic diets has become a trend in some areas. Most use the studies from years ago that reportedly “prove” their points. This post is intended to clear up the “8 common misconceptions about ketogenic diets” and inaccuracies of those studies and posts. First of all I want to state that you can “prove” almost anything by searching studies. A study can have flawed techniques, later dis-proven by other studies, and much more but the study is still there. One example is the study linking stevia to infertility in mice from 1968. It has since been dis-proven many times but people will still do posts trashing stevia and point to that study as “Proof”. That is why Maria and I rely on only the latest science and look at every study with a critical eye (what were the methods, who funded the study, how was the diet formulated, how long was the study run). We rely on outcomes much more than any study. Outcomes are “has my client improved as a result of my recommendations?”. That is what really counts and is why, in addition to some study examples, we will also list testimonies (outcomes) from clients. 1. What is a Ketogenic Diet? This is one of the biggest areas of misunderstanding among bloggers and in scientific studies. Just like any diet or lifestyle you have to have a well formulated plan for it to be effective. With a ketogenic lifestyle this is as important as with any diet. That is why I like to say “Well Formulated Ketogenic Diet” when talking about this lifestyle. A well formulated ketogenic diet consists of high fat (70-80% of calories), moderate protein (15-20% of calories) and low carbohydrate (5% or less of calories). This is where many of the studies cited by the critics of ketogenic die Continue reading >>

3 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Fear Bacon

3 Reasons Why You Shouldn't Fear Bacon

Bacon has gained a bad reputation in mainstream media. There are three main reasons for that: it has high level of saturated fat it has high level of sodium it contains nitrates (sodium and potassium nitrates) Let's talk about each one of them... 1) Saturated fat As I highlighted in an article about saturated fat, there is NO evidence that: too much saturated fat raises cholesterol saturated fat causes heart disease high cholesterol causes heart disease lowering cholesterol reduces heart disease there is a correlation between obesity rates and the amount of fat consumption there is a correlation between obesity rates and the amount of protein consumption The types of fat you should be worried about are toxic trans fats and polyunsaturated fats, particularly high omega 6 / omega 3 ratio. Bottom line: Don't be afraid of saurated fat. 2) Sodium and low-carb diets It's a fact that bacon is high in sodium, but is it bad for us? The general advise is to keep sodium low. However, for low-carb ketogenic diets, an increased amount is desired. The RDA of sodium according to the USDA is 2,300 mg, which may not be enough for a low-carb diet. The reason is that insulin, which also has the effect of reducing the rate at which sodium is extracted through kidneys, drops and it can cause sodium levels to drop significantly, too. Also, as you eliminate processed foods from your diet, your sodium intake will likely be lower than what you've been used to. You can also check my post about sufficient intake of electrolytes. Increased intake of electrolytes will help you overcome the side effects of giving up carbohydrates (fatigue, cramps and headaches). So, how much sodium is adequate? You should add about 3,000-5,000 mg in addition to sodium naturally occurring in food (Lyle McDonald, "The Continue reading >>

Keto, Paleo, And Yoli Diets: Do They Really Work?

Keto, Paleo, And Yoli Diets: Do They Really Work?

In the past, there was Atkins, After-6, South Beach, Mediterranean, Zone, and Raw Food. These days, there's Paleo (or Caveman) Diet, the Ketogenic Diet, and the fairly new Yoli Better Body System. What are these and do they really bring that much coveted weight loss? Simply put, the Paleo Diet restricts food choices to stuff a caveman would have eaten centuries ago: vegetables, meats, fruits, seafood, and nuts. That means no processed food, no fast food, no dairy, no grains, no added salt, no legumes, no whole grains, no alcohol, and no honey. Call it a going-back-to-basics kind of diet, where grass-fed and organic choices are given the thumbs up. The Ketogenic Diet, on the other hand, is a low-carb, high-fat diet which aims to bring the body to ketosis, the state when the body starts to produce ketones, which the body can use as alternative fuel. The usual fuel used by the body is blood sugar or glucose. When the body is in ketosis, it will access fat stored in the body and burn them. This diet has in fact been used for epileptics since the 1920s since it decreases seizures. Meanwhile, the Yoli Better Body System is not strictly a diet but more of a wellness system that incorporates a high-protein meal plan, protein supplements, and other supplements to improve metabolism, pH balance, and the gastrointestinal system. So the million-dollar question is: Do they work? Do they bring about weight loss? A number of people say they do. Paleo for a year Former TV network executive Sheila Paras said she went on the paleo diet in 2014 to lose excess weight gained when she was pregnant. “I couldn't just go on any diet at the time, because I was breastfeeding and had to be well-nourished. I needed to eat healthy fats, aside from vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, and also had to Continue reading >>

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