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Keto Gave Me A Heart Attack

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets Found To Feed Heart Disease

Low Carb Diets Found To Feed Heart Disease

People going on low carb diets may not see a rise in their cholesterol levels. How is that possible? Because weight loss by any means can drop our cholesterol. We could go on an all-Twinkie diet and lower our cholesterol as long as we didn’t eat too many. A good cocaine habit could do it. Anything that drops our weight can drop our cholesterol, but the goal isn’t to fit into a skinnier casket; the reason we care about cardiovascular risk factors like cholesterol is because we care about cardiovascular risk, the health of our arteries. Now we have studies that measure the impact of low carb diets on arteries directly, and a review of all the best studies to date found that low-carb diets impair arterial function, as evidenced by a decrease in flow-mediated dilation, meaning low-carb diets effectively stiffen people’s arteries. And since that meta-analysis was published, a new study found the same thing: “A dietary pattern characterized by high protein and fat, but low carbohydrate was associated with poorer peripheral small artery function,” again measuring blood flow into people’s limbs. But peripheral circulation is not as important as the circulation in the coronary arteries that feed our heart. There has only been one study ever done measuring actual blood flow to the heart muscles of people eating low-carb diets. Dr. Richard Fleming, an accomplished nuclear cardiologist, enrolled 26 people into a comprehensive study of the effects of diet on cardiac function using the latest in nuclear imaging technology–so-called SPECT scans, enabling him to actually directly measure the blood flow within the coronary arteries. He then put them all on a healthy vegetarian diet, and a year later the scans were repeated. By that time, however, ten of the patients had ju Continue reading >>

How To Avoid A Heart Attack While Doing A Ketogenic (or Any Other) Diet

How To Avoid A Heart Attack While Doing A Ketogenic (or Any Other) Diet

One of the biggest questions that anyone asks in relation to a high fat diet is this: “will eating a high fat diet cause heart disease.” And this is where everyone starts to lose their minds. On one side, we have the lipid hypothesis, which points at fat as the main cause of heart disease while ignoring every other possible hypothesis and every study that demonstrates that there is not a relationship between fat intake and heart disease all while tapping its finger on its Ivy League medical diploma. On the other side we have the low carb high fat cult that argues for high fat intake as if it is some verse from the bible. In the minds of these people, carbohydrate in all of its forms is the devil and they point their fingers and laugh at the non converted as if they are on a one way road to high blood sugar hell. Very few have ever tried to meet in the middle. Now, I’m obviously someone who believes in the benefits of a high fat diet. I helped create a course called Keto Camp for God’s sake. But I also think that this madness needs to stop. We are doing nothing but talking past each other. This is not me saying that the lipid hypothesis isn’t wrong. Evidence in recent years has consistently pointed to the fact that there is no relationship between fat intake and heart disease in both epidemiological and human subject studies. Evidence has also demonstrated that a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can help athletes to perform as well or better than they would on a high carb low fat diet. But what I am saying is this: there are other paths to healthy living besides a ketogenic diet, and there is a right way and a wrong way to do a ketogenic diet, and if done the wrong way, the ketogenic diet can be very unhealthy. So here are four ways to ensure that your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Go to: Abstract Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat) in obese patients. In the present study, 83 obese patients (39 men and 44 women) with a body mass index greater than 35 kg/m2, and high glucose and cholesterol levels were selected. The body weight, body mass index, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, urea and creatinine levels were determined before and after the administration of the ketogenic diet. Changes in these parameters were monitored after eight, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment. The weight and body mass index of the patients decreased significantly (P<0.0001). The level of total cholesterol decreased from week 1 to week 24. HDL cholesterol levels significantly increased, whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased after treatment. The level of triglycerides decreased significantly following 24 weeks of treatment. The level of blood glucose significantly decreased. The changes in the level of urea and creatinine were not statistically significant. The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administering a ketogenic diet for a relatively longer period of time did Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Fights Cancer And Heart Disease For Longer And Healthier Life

Keto Diet Fights Cancer And Heart Disease For Longer And Healthier Life

Health Benefits of Ketones A ketogenic diet is characterized by the production of ketones, small molecules that the body can use as alternative energy sources. These molecules — beta hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone — are produced when carbohydrate consumption is very low. Depletion of glycogen, the storage form of carbohydrate, results in the production of ketones from fatty acids. Intermittent fasting also causes the production of ketones, since if you’re not eating anything, you’re not eating carbohydrates either. How low does carbohydrate consumption need to be to cause the production of ketones? The amount varies, and most people will need to eat 50 grams or fewer carbohydrate daily to see a rise in ketones. People who are very physically active, such as through daily strenuous exercise, may be able to eat 100 grams or more and still be in ketosis. Ketones are used as an alternative to glucose. The body only carries about a 24-hour supply of glycogen — which is broken down to glucose — but the supply of fat is enough to last for weeks or months, depending on how much fat the person has. So after a period of about 24 hours with minimal carbohydrate intake, the production of ketones ramps up. Just to be clear, the ketones under discussion here have nothing to do with raspberry ketones, which are a current weight-loss fad and appear to be ineffective for that purpose. Health benefits of ketogenic diets Ketones and the ketogenic diet have a number of health benefits. The ketogenic diet has strong anti-seizure properties. Many children and adults with epilepsy, whose condition cannot be treated with drugs, become seizure-free with a ketogenic diet.(1) The effect may be due to increased mitochondrial energy production in the brain. Ketones and the k Continue reading >>

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Cholesterol

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Cholesterol

What happens to your cholesterol when you eat high-fat, keto? Jimmy Moore and I review my 9 month cholesterol numbers since going low-carb, high-fat, keto. I’ve been following a high-fat, low-carb, keto eating style for 9 months (as outlined in my 30-day keto program) and my blood test results are in! Today; with the help of Jimmy Moore, we’re reviewing my results and chatting about what eating high-fat, low-carb, keto does to your cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides. AND! We show you how to interpret the results of your blood tests, the cholesterol numbers you should watch for, foods that put you at risk, the connection between triglycerides and carb intake, and how to change your numbers for the better. If you’re curious about cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, today’s video will give you the full picture so that you can make a healthful, informed decision about yourself, your health and your high-fat, keto life. Highlights… What eating “high-fat” or “keto” did to my cholesterol (HDL, LDL and triglycerides) What cholesterol numbers to watch for The food your body needs to increase your HDL The connection between carb intake and triglycerides What eating high-fat, keto does to your cholesterol numbers Resources… Get Jimmy’s Book, Cholesterol Clarity My 30-day Meal Plan + High-Fat, Keto Guidebook, The Keto Beginning VIDEO TRANSCRIPTION Leanne: Jimmy, you’re here in the flesh. Jimmy Moore: Hey, hey, hey. Leanne: For those of you guys who don’t know Jimmy Moore, first of all you’ve probably been living under a rock because this guy’s huge. Excited to have you here on the show today. Jimmy busted on health scene in 2004 after a phenomenal 180 pound weight loss that enabled him to come off of his prescription drugs for high cholesterol, Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

As the ketogenic diet gains popularity, it’s important to have a balanced discussion regarding the merits of this diet. Let me emphasize right out of the gate that this is not a diet without merits (excuse the double negative); in fact, it has significant therapeutic potential for some clinical pathologies. However, it is also a diet with inherent risk, as evidenced by the extensive list of adverse reactions reported in the scientific literature—and this has not yet been a thorough enough part of the public discussion on ketogenic diets. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first of a series of articles discussing various facets of a ketogenic diet with an inclination toward balancing the discussion of the pros and cons of this high-fat, low-carb, low/moderate-protein diet. My interest in this topic stems from concerns I have over its general applicability and safety, simultaneous with its growing popularity. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. The dangers of a ketogenic diet was, in fact, the topic of my keynote presentation at Paleo F(x) this year (links to video will be provided once available). This series of articles will share the extensive research that I did in preparation for this presentation, including all of the topics covered during my talk as well as several topics that I didn’t have time to discuss (also see the free PDF Literature Review at the bottom of this post). For every anecdotal story of someone who has regained their health with a ketogenic diet, there’s a counterpoint story of someone who derai Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

Why Ketogenic?

Why Ketogenic?

I started using the Ketogenic Diet nearly a year ago, on the advice from a good friend. My first reaction was that it sounded like it could not possibly work and was actually unhealthy. However, I had tried just about everything else you could think of, and I was not healthy. I needed to make a change. I am obese. It is that simple. However, changing to the Keto diet was not about losing weight. It was more about getting good control of diabetes. If weight loss also came, that was a huge side-benefit, one that was I was not seeking, but was welcome. I have come to accept my size and weight.. it is who I am. I have been a big guy for years, since I was a young child. If I ever become thin, that ‘s great, but it is not the overall goal of my life. My goal is to live a good life with my family and enjoy living. Why I switched to Keto Back in 2015, I started using Insulin to gain better control of diabetes. At the time, I had brought my weight down to 250 pounds, which was less than I weighed when I was in High School. I really felt good at 250, and I was pretty happy. Then the doctor convinced me to start using insulin. After starting on Insulin, the weight started coming back on. I was eating the recommended low fat diet. Lots of salads, veggies. Limited meat, etc. I was strictly monitoring how many calories I was taking in. I was eating about 800 calories per day. I was almost always hungry. I was also gaining weight every day! Hungry. 800 Calories per day. Gaining a lot of weight. I was exercising most days. It did not make any sense. At that time, I was using 100 units per day of insulin. I talked to my doctor about it, and he told me that the use of insulin caused most people to gain weight. Hmm… well, my diabetes was better controlled, but still not perfect, but Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Wrong and outdated health information often causes worry about the healthiness of the ketogenic diet. One of the biggest concerns is: does a ketogenic diet change your lipid profile? In order to tackle and address these concerns, we’ll be covering what lipid profile means, why it’s included in myths about the ketogenic diet and why you don’t need to worry about most of what you’ve been told. Lipids and the Ketogenic Diet The main purpose of the ketogenic diet today is to provide a measurable state of metabolism through nutritional ketosis. There are many benefits of ketosis, including weight loss, better mental clarity, and more energy. These benefits make the ketogenic diet enticing, but what about how it affects lipids in the body? To understand this, let’s discuss what lipids are and the beliefs surrounding them and the keto diet. What is a Lipid Profile? A lipid profile is the measure of fats and fatty substances (lipids) that your body uses as energy. These are usually measured via a lipid panel of blood tests meant to look for any irregularities in your lipid amounts. Lipids include: Triglycerides Cholesterol High-density lipoprotein (HDL, often know as “good,” cholesterol) Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, often known as “bad,” cholesterol) The ketogenic diet raises some concerns around the diet negatively affecting one’s lipid profile and increasing their risks of diseases related to high cholesterol or triglycerides. Let’s take a look at these concerns. Myths About Fat and Cholesterol Below are some of the myths when it comes to the ketogenic diet and lipid profiles. We’re used to hearing many of these due to bad or old science — and we all know the internet is rampant with poor (and sometimes harmful) information. Myth: Cholesterol is bad Continue reading >>

Food: Serious As A Heart Attack

Food: Serious As A Heart Attack

At 9:15 PM on Tuesday April 2, 2007, just as the opening credits for that evening’s episode of Star Trek Enterprise started rolling, I had a massive heart attack and died. Three times in fact. I died on my living room floor, in the ambulance and once again in the ER. Long story full of heavy drama, cliff-hanger close calls, amazing technologies and personal transformations, but the upshot was that I spent 6 days in a cardiac ICU and generated well over a hundred grand in medical debt. The nurses later told me that only 4 percent survive the kind of heart attack I had. Very. Close. Call. Yep. Phew… Coming out of that event I was seriously disabled. A 50-foot walk to the mailbox at the end of my driveway required a 45 minute nap afterwards. Nonetheless, in between naps I could go online and I did. My focus was, “What the hell happened?” I had no significant lifestyle risk factors, no family history of heart disease and had been a strict vegetarian for over 40 years, eating a diet that included no meat, fish, birds or eggs, or anything containing those as ingredients. I did eat dairy products, including milk, cheeses, yogurt and butter, but those were the only animal products I consumed and I had them in small amounts. I was 56 at the time of my heart attack, just 3 weeks before my 57th birthday. How could I – a low-fat, high complex-carb vegetarian eating a plant-based diet as recommended by everyone from Michael Pollan to Michelle Obama – end up with a host of serious and chronic health issues and have one of them kill me dead? (Yes, obviously they brought me back, but that was entirely a function of good luck, modern medical technology and especially the clot-buster injection that went straight into my heart, and then later, the arterial stent. And obviously Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets And Heart Disease – What Are We Afraid Of?

Low Carb Diets And Heart Disease – What Are We Afraid Of?

I find it extraordinary how carbohydrate restriction is repeatedly rejected by the medical community as an alternative approach for obesity, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many countries around the world. Diabetes and other obesity related disorders have become increasingly common. Public health organizations and medical societies usually advocate a low-fat, high-carbohydrate, energy-deficient diet to manage weight. Nonetheless, clinical experience and scientific studies indicate that other approaches may be more effective. The main argument against carbohydrate-restricted, high-fat diets are concerns regarding their long-term safety. Most such diets encourage increased consumption of animal products and therefore they often contain high amounts of saturated fat and cholesterol. It has been suggested that this may cause unfavorable changes in blood lipids and thereby increase the risk of heart disease. Therefore, several professional organizations have cautioned against the use of low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets. According to a statement from the American Heart Association AHA, updated January 2012, “eating large amounts of high-fat foods for a sustained period raises the risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, stroke and several types of cancer.” An older statement from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada claims that ” low carbohydrate diets often lack vitamins and are low in fibre. A low fibre diet can result in constipation and can increase your risk of colon cancer. Low carbohydrate diets tend to replace carbohydrate with fat and protein. High intake of protein can result in large amounts of calcium in the urine, and loss of bone mass. High intake of fat, particularly saturated and trans fat, ca Continue reading >>

Lipid Changes On A Very-low-carb Ketogenic Diet: My Own Experience

Lipid Changes On A Very-low-carb Ketogenic Diet: My Own Experience

I'd like to preface this blog post by apologizing for its length, including links to several long articles. Also, for anyone who doesn't know me, I'm a vocal and enthusiastic supporter of low-carbohydrate diets, but I always strive to be balanced in my writing. I'm very nonconfrontational and don't like "getting into it" with people who disagree with me. However, I expect I'll receive plenty of negative feedback from this article because of the controversial topic. Cholesterol Results From June 2013 through November 2013 My cholesterol levels have always been higher than average. LDL has ranged from 120s-150s as far back as I can remember, long before I began following a moderately carbohydrate-restricted diet back in 2011. In June of last year, I reported my NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) LipoProfile results after almost a year of consuming a very-low-carb ketogenic diet (VLCKD) containing less than 50 grams net carb per day. I was very happy with these values and frankly a little surprised that I achieved them while eating delicious, satiating foods. Lipid Profile from November 2013 In November of last year, I had a standard lipid profile done as part of lab work for my annual physical: Total Cholesterol: 300 LDL-C: 160 HDL-C: 128 TG: 56 My numbers had increased, but I wasn't terribly concerned about the LDL-C, since on a few occasions it had been nearly that high in the past. Seeing a total cholesterol of 300 was a bit troubling, but I knew it was partially due to having extremely high HDL (Apparently high levels of some types of HDL can also be problematic, although I didn't realize this at the time). Looking back, although I wasn't tracking my intake online regularly back then, I'm pretty sure I was eating the same or perhaps a little more fat than when I had the Continue reading >>

Can A Low-carb Diet Help Prevent A Heart Attack?

Can A Low-carb Diet Help Prevent A Heart Attack?

Conventional advice says one of the best ways to help your heart (and your waistline) is to stay away from fatty foods like red meat. But according to a new study, the opposite might actually be true. New research published in the journal PLOS ONE found that focusing on reducing your carbohydrate intake is actually better for your health than just trying to stay away from fat. In fact, when researchers looked at 17 randomized studies of overweight people, they found that a high-fat, low-carb diet was 98 percent more likely to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke than skimping on fat in favor of carbs. (Learn more about The Truth About the Low-Carb High-Fat Diet.) But the perks went beyond heart health: Participants on the low-carb diet (consuming less than 120 grams a day) were 99 percent more likely to lose weight than those avoiding fats (making up less than 30 percent of their daily calories). Those are tough numbers to argue with! On average, the low-carb dieters lost about five pounds more than their low-fat counterparts. (Find out Why Women Need Fat.) Researchers aren't exactly sure why reducing carbs in favor of avoiding fat lowered the risk of heart attack and stroke, but they think it probably has more to do with fewer carbs and less to do with more fat. As for the weight loss, the reason why is pretty simple, says study author Jonathan Sackner-Bernstein, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University. While carbs are great for spiking short-term energy levels, they also cause your body to produce a ton of insulin—a hormone that regulates how our bodies use or store glucose and fat. When you eat a ton of carbs, your body releases insulin rapidly, essentially telling your body that it needs to store extra fuel for later, leading you to pack Continue reading >>

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