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Keto Flu Sore Throat

Healing A Sore Throat Without Honey

Healing A Sore Throat Without Honey

NEW Keto-Adapted Video! We are always trying to improve our services and make life easier for you. We have made a very in-depth and detailed video on Keto-Adaption, how it works, how to calculate the right ratios of protein, fats and carbs, as well as how to test if you are in ketosis. This video is included in my nutrition packages. Click HERE to get started on your path to health and healing today! Testimony of the Day “Hi Maria!! I need to tell you Thank You!! I wanted to let you know 2013 has been the best year of my life. I am so happy I found your blog, and signed up for a consult. I’m down over 60 pounds, and off all but 1 prescription medication!!! I was taking over 600 pills a month, prescription and non-prescription. I had headaches everyday, had no energy, severe acid reflux and had severe IBS. For the first time in my life I feel amazing!!! My body is changing, and it feels great. I used to be a carb loader, now I have turned my body into a fat burner thanks to you!! You have given me back my health, which I am forever grateful!!!! -Tanya Have a sore throat? Skip the trick of using honey in your tea for it’s healing properties! Honey may be less refined and more natural than white sugar, but honey is still high in calories and fructose. It contains sugar and calories just like any other sweetener. One teaspoon of natural honey contains 22 calories. Honey actually contains more calories than sugar, as one teaspoon of sugar contains 16 calories. The biggest problem with honey is that it is roughly 50% fructose. One of the big contributors to the aging process and the development and perpetuation of degenerative diseases is Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). Glycation is when a chemical reaction occurs between proteins and either sugars, lipid peroxi Continue reading >>

Keto-flu: Cheating On Keto Will Give You A Bad Time

Keto-flu: Cheating On Keto Will Give You A Bad Time

“Keto flu” is very common state during induction phase of Ketosis. This state is also followed by dizziness, nausea, diarrhea, or muscle cramps. Ketogenic life is real science, but don’t let loose yourself in a whole bunch of numbers. This article is very important for beginners, because they often have higher goals than experience. For some keto beginner’s, “Keto-flu” can be a real challenge for continuing or stopping with keto diet. Normalize your blood pressure People who ends up on Keto diet automatically ends up with cutting a lot of processed food rich with sodium. Reduced intake of carbs causing proper leveling of blood sugar, for that reason our body doesn’t need to elevate levels of insulin to stabilize blood sugar. The final effect is, low blood pressure In normal conditions our kidneys tend to store high levels of sodium. But on low insulin levels, kidneys change their behavior. There are a lot of hormonal activities which the kidneys put in diuretic type mode. In this mode kidneys release stored levels of sodium, potassium, and water through the urine. The major function of the salt is maintaining blood pressure, but if you do not replace your daily needs of salt as a side effect you can feel dizziness, fatigue, or weakness. For that reason introduce salt and fluids in your diet. Fluids are essential part for right leveling blood pressure. There are certainly kind of beverages that are carb-free or very low in carbs. Check out a few ideas in the link below (Premium Collection of Keto Beverages) Another easy way to overcome this state is preparing (Natural Sugar-free Ketogenic Electrolyte Drink). This drink refuels your daily needs for sodium, magnesium and potassium. Prevent nausea and diarrhea Some people have bad experience with Keto-flu foll Continue reading >>

Should You Stay In Ketosis While Sick?

Should You Stay In Ketosis While Sick?

This is a tough question for those low carbing out there. There is no doubt that ketosis is a fat burning state that forces your body to metabolize food differently. But what about staying in keotsis while sick? Should you call it quits for the week? The month? The answer is a bit more complex. How sick are you? “sick” can mean a variety of different things. If you are having a cold for instance, staying in ketosis should be okay. Symptoms of runny nose, sore throat, cough, mild congestion, mild fever, are all generally manageable with over the counter meds and hydration. Generally if you feel you are up to the task, staying in ketosis when you have the common cold is usually safe and reasonably easy to manage. Some tips and tricks… Sugar Free Cough Drops. Dont forget that cough drops are loaded with sugar, which can throw you out of ketosis. I like to get HALLS Sugar-Free Cough Drops {affiliate link} and only use them when absolutely necessary Other great foods when your sick is homemade chicken zuchini noodle soup, scrambled eggs, pot roast, egg drop soup or basically any low carb soup you can make. Noatmeal is another low carb hot cereal option. Some people prefer to make bullet proof tea instead of bullet proof coffee. Even plain tea is a great option, just try to avoid the honey if you can resist. For a sore throat, sugar free jell-o with whipped cream is always an option for food. If you have more of a flu like sickness, or If you are having more of a stomach upset with nausea and vomiting, then perhaps keeping down what foods you can is better strategy. Sometimes when it is hard to keep anything down, it is better to eat something rather than nothing at all. The tried and true method of ginger ale and crackers is probably one of your best bets. There are op Continue reading >>

Are You Lower-carb Than You Think?

Are You Lower-carb Than You Think?

Over the last couple of weeks we’ve been discussing the benefits and risks of low-carb and very low-carb diets. Laura, one of my staff nutritionists, kicked things off with an article called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health?”, and I followed up with an article called “7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-Carb Diets”. Then Kelsey, my other staff nutritionist, wrote an article called “The 3-Step Process for Determining Your Ideal Carbohydrate Intake”. In the near future, we’ll be featuring an article about the therapeutic uses for very low-carb and ketogenic diets. Are you on an “accidental” very low-carb diet? Find out here: The takeaway from all of these articles is relatively simple and uncontroversial—at least according to anthropological and clinical research: Very low-carb (VLC) and ketogenic diets are useful therapeutic tools in certain conditions. Some (but not all) people experience adverse effects from following VLC and ketogenic diets—especially when done over an extended period of time. Very low-carb diets were extremely rare during the course of our evolution and are not the “default human diet” (as some have claimed). Before we move on to cover the therapeutic uses of VLC/ketogenic diets, I want to address an issue that I see relatively frequently in my private practice. I’ve begun to think of it as the “accidental low-carb diet” phenomenon. The best way to explain this is to share a case study. The accidental low-carb diet: Frank’s story A few months ago I spoke to a patient—we’ll call him Frank. Frank is a 32-year old male who is on the SWAT team in a major metropolitan city. He came to see me complaining of extreme fatigue, insomnia, and exercise intolerance. These issues were obviously of paramount import Continue reading >>

Remedies For Keto Flu Sore Throat

Remedies For Keto Flu Sore Throat

My throat started hurting a couple days ago. Until today, I considered a sore throat as a sign of success. I’ve gone through keto induction four times. Every single time I’ve gotten a rotten, awful sore throat. It’s pretty much like, “oh! my throat hurts! must be in ketosis!” Pee on a keto stick. Confirmed. But it still hurts like hell, and today I connected the dots and realized that it’s a symptom of a bigger keto problem. Searching through the internets will give you a bunch of people who will ask “does keto give you a sore throar?” Followed by a bunch of keto-ers and low-carbers who will tell you going on keto won’t give you a sore throat, and neither will keto flu. I can’t blame them, they’re just speaking from their personal experience. But they’re a little wrong, and that’s the puzzle piece I figured out today. A keto diet naturally lowers your pH, which can do a whole host of bad things to your body. Last year I went to a natural health clinic where they tested my blood and pH. This was about a month after being in ketosis. One major red flag that came up was my pH. My pH was around 6 when it’s supposed to be between 6.4 and 7.4, ideally closer to the 7.4. In fact, they say Cancer dies at a pH of 8. A pH of 6 might not look far off, but it is. A reading of 5.5 is acidosis. Guess what one of the side effects of having a pH around 6? Oh you know, just a SORE THROAT, amongst lots of other issues, like being a magnet for infection and sickness. Did you know that when your pH is low, you also absorb 20% less oxygen, too? So regardless of whether your sore throat comes from your low pH balance directly, or because you got sick based on your low pH balance – this is something to watch. It’s not healthy, in fact I think eating bread and s Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

The Keto Flu And How To Deal With It

The Keto Flu And How To Deal With It

The keto flu is your body’s response to the withdrawal of carbohydrates from your diet. The transition period your body goes through when learning to burn stored body fat (instead of chips, white bread, pizza and sodas) for fuel causes you to experience flu-like symptoms for a short period of time. This is known as the “keto flu”. Why Do You Get the Keto Flu? When starting the ketogenic diet most people feel flu like symptoms related to carb-withdrawal. Just like a drug addict who is getting off drugs, your body is addicted to garbage carbs. Carbs have been your bodies main energy source most of your life, especially for Americans. Replacing garbage carbs as the main energy source is the goal of a ketogenic diet for weight loss. You want to change your diet so that your body uses stored fat for energy instead of your daily dose of garbage carbs via the typical Americans pretty disgusting eating habits. Take a look at the back of a bag of Nacho Cheese Doritos below. It contains 140 calories, 210mg of sodium, and 16g of carbs. Add that to a Subway Italian BMT sandwich that has 1330mg of sodium, 43g of carbs, and 390 calories along with a coke (12oz has 39g of carbs) … and you’ve got a food addiction problem in your cells. Your Subway sandwich lunch has 98g of carbs. On the ketogenic diet, to reach ketosis, it’s recommended to be below 50g of carbs daily and optimally near 30g of carbs or under! Throw in a trip to one of America’s most popular Italian restaurants, with unlimited breadsticks at 26g total carbs per stick (and 370mg of sodium), and you are in for a whole heap’a trouble weaning yourself off a high carb diet. When I’d go to that chain restaurant, I’d usually down 3-4 breadsticks with every meal. When Does the Keto Flu Hit? While you adjust t Continue reading >>

Is Carb Flu Normal?

Is Carb Flu Normal?

I often get this question from people who are new to a healthy way of living and are experiencing some uncomfortable symptoms. Especially if you are switching from a conventional low-fat, high grain diet, you might be noticing that you are tired and have some uncomfortable symptoms like headache, fatigue, achy muscles or brain fog. Don’t worry… you don’t have the flu… at least not the viral one! This discomfort during the transition phase is often called “carb flu” and should pass in about a week or so. The good news is that you’ll feel much better on the other side and once you start to feel better, all the symptoms go away almost instantly. The bad news is that there isn’t too terribly much you can do make it go faster. The other bad news (I’m not sounding very positive today, am I?) is that there are things you can do that will make the carb flu worse! Cheating, even a little, at this point will make the fatigue and headache better temporarily, but will make the symptoms worse. It is completely normal to experience these symptoms as your body switches from burning glucose to being able to use fat and protein instead. As Mark Sisson explains: If your body is used to employing easy glucose carbs and now must create glucose from fats and protein (a slightly more complex but entirely natural mode of operation), it can take some time to get up to speed. Rest assured that our bodies can and are doing the job. It simply takes time to work efficiently. The transition actually shifts metabolic related gene expression, increasing fat oxidation pathways and decreasing fat storage pathways. (That’s nothing to shake a stick at!) Within a few weeks, the body should be fairly efficient at converting protein and fat for the liver’s glycogen stores, which provid Continue reading >>

The Science Behind The “low Carb Flu”, And How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility

The Science Behind The “low Carb Flu”, And How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility

Important note!my 2013 AHS presentation “What Is Metabolic Flexibility, And Why Is It Important?” Most of us who eat a low-carbohydrate diet—Paleo, Primal, Atkins, or otherwise—experience anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks of low energy as we adjust to it, an experience known informally as the “low carb flu”. And some people never seem to adjust. Here’s why—and here are some ideas that might help you if you’re having trouble adjusting! Note that low-carb isn’t an objective of a paleo diet: it’s just the usual consequence of eliminating grains and sugars. It’s certainly possible to eat a higher-carb paleo diet—and it’s a good idea if you’re doing frequent, intense workouts like HIIT, Crossfit, or team sports after school—but you’d have to eat a lot of potatoes and bananas to get anywhere near the same amount of carbohydrate you used to get from bread, pasta, cereal, and soda. Burning Food For Energy: Glycolysis and Beta-Oxidation Our bodies have several ways to turn stored or ingested energy into the metabolic energy required to move around and stay alive. This is called cellular respiration. The two main types of cellular respiration are anaerobic (which does not require oxygen) and aerobic (which requires oxygen). Anaerobic metabolism, also known as fermentation, is nineteen times less efficient—and we can only maintain it for short periods, because its waste products build up very quickly. This is why we can’t sprint for long distances. We spend most of our time in aerobic metabolism. Our two primary aerobic sources of energy are glycolysis, which converts glucose to energy, and beta-oxidation, which converts fat to energy. A Short Metabolic Digression Explaining The Above (Optional) Strictly speaking, glycolysis is the Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

You Know You’ve Reached Ketosis When…

You Know You’ve Reached Ketosis When…

you can smell how weird your pee and sweat smell, through your snot-laden plague. TMI? TMI. so yea, i’ve definitely reached ketosis. which makes sense, according to the standard timeline. i started keto on friday, but had a slightly high carb intake for keto (although 48 net carbs would be the equivalent to death for me six months ago). but by this morning i was definitely, 100% sure that i had reached ketosis. **cue shimmery music and rays of sunlight** i was so damn sick yesterday that i had no appetite, and for the first time in my life could not hit my macros. i ended up making (brace yourselves) a heavy whipping cream and protein powder pudding concoction. not the worst thing i’ve ever had; not the best, either. coach suggested i acquire a taste for avocado ASAP. (i hate avocado. blech.) i was wondering how early morning training was going to feel without my usual pre-workout of oatmeal & pb. today was my experimental first attempt. for starters, i wasn’t even super-hungry this morning (which is strange because [a] i barely hit my numbers yesterday, [b] i went to bed at 8pm, which was three hours after my protein pudding adventure, and didn’t get up until a little after 6am, and [c] i’m usually ready to devour the kitchen when i wake up), but the last thing i wanted was to start getting hungry in the middle of my squat workout. soooo…i had four slices of bacon. A+ decision. didn’t feel hungry at all – it held through a car de-icing expedition, a workout, and a shower – and my apartment smelled like bacon-heaven when i got back four hours later! as for the workout – i mentioned yesterday that my DOMS from friday’s squats was almost unbearable. it got a little better by this morning, and i went in, rowed for a few minutes to warm up, foam rolled Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

What Is Keto Flu ?

What Is Keto Flu ?

So What is Keto Flu Anyways!? I posted this What is Keto Flu article below back in the summer of 2013 when I had no idea what I was doing or what keto flu was. All I knew is that I was sick as a dog! I’ve learned so much since then and so many people manage to find this article, so I thought I should update it with the solutions that work! The Keto flu is also called Ketosis Flu, Ketogenic Flu, Induction Flu and Carb Flu depending on what groups you hang out in. It normally is what happens after your first couple of days without carbs. Not to every single person, but most people go through some sort of carb withdrawal and/or carb detox. What actually causes the Keto Flu Symptoms? Keto flu happens when our bodies shift from glucose or sugar burning mode to fat burning mode. It is basically an electrolyte imbalance. On a keto diet we need more magnesium, potassium and sodium. Luckily, this is a pretty easy problem to solve and I wish I had known about this 3 years ago! Can You Stop Keto Flu ? You know, for some of us, the keto flu is something we just have to go through for a few days. Think of it as a detox because bottom line, that is what is happening. You are detoxing from sugar, carbs, wheat, all those things that are holding you back from optimal health. But even though you likely can’t stop keto flu, you sure can minimize the symptoms! Drink lots of salty chicken broth. Use a magnesium supplement. You will be amazed at how helpful this will be! I recommend using Lo Salt or any similar blend that has potassium and sodium. My other go to remedy is a nightly drink of Calm. This is a magnesium drink that I swear by and I still use it almost every night. Not only does Calm prevent leg cramps but it also keeps me regular, which can be an issue for low carbers. It is Continue reading >>

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