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Keto Flu Muscle Aches

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

A common question I get asked after clients start a ketogenic diet is “why do I feel lousy?” Like them, you’re probably thinking going keto will provide an immediate mental and physical boost. For some, it will. For others, you may experience adverse symptoms, also known as the “keto flu”. When you start a very low-carb ketogenic diet, you’ll flush water and sodium out of your body in the first few weeks. As your sodium levels fall, so too will potassium levels. This can leave you feeling tired, sluggish, and wondering what you got yourself into. Fear not, it’s only temporary. Here are some suggestions for avoiding key mineral deficiencies when jumping into a ketogenic diet. Sodium One of the biggest health and nutrition “myths” is that you should avoid salt. If you’re fit, healthy, and following a keto diet you’ll lose water and sodium in the first few weeks. For athletes, this problem can be compounded because you also lose sodium through your sweat, and as your sweat rate increases, your sodium and blood volume will decline. Not a good recipe for optimal energy and performance. On the flip side, if you’re overweight, out of shape or in poor health then your body is likely already holding on to too much sodium from high consumption of packaged and processed foods (i.e. sodium is used as the primary preservative) or from chronically elevated insulin levels. Therefore, a low-carb or keto approach is great way to restore healthy levels. Symptoms of low sodium include fatigue, headaches, compromised ability to perform (especially outdoors in the heat) and in more serious cases you may pass out. Remember that most of the sodium in your body is found in your bloodstream, so if your body gets deficient, you don’t have many reserves to tap into. In t Continue reading >>

The Science Behind The “low Carb Flu”, And How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility

The Science Behind The “low Carb Flu”, And How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility

Important note!my 2013 AHS presentation “What Is Metabolic Flexibility, And Why Is It Important?” Most of us who eat a low-carbohydrate diet—Paleo, Primal, Atkins, or otherwise—experience anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks of low energy as we adjust to it, an experience known informally as the “low carb flu”. And some people never seem to adjust. Here’s why—and here are some ideas that might help you if you’re having trouble adjusting! Note that low-carb isn’t an objective of a paleo diet: it’s just the usual consequence of eliminating grains and sugars. It’s certainly possible to eat a higher-carb paleo diet—and it’s a good idea if you’re doing frequent, intense workouts like HIIT, Crossfit, or team sports after school—but you’d have to eat a lot of potatoes and bananas to get anywhere near the same amount of carbohydrate you used to get from bread, pasta, cereal, and soda. Burning Food For Energy: Glycolysis and Beta-Oxidation Our bodies have several ways to turn stored or ingested energy into the metabolic energy required to move around and stay alive. This is called cellular respiration. The two main types of cellular respiration are anaerobic (which does not require oxygen) and aerobic (which requires oxygen). Anaerobic metabolism, also known as fermentation, is nineteen times less efficient—and we can only maintain it for short periods, because its waste products build up very quickly. This is why we can’t sprint for long distances. We spend most of our time in aerobic metabolism. Our two primary aerobic sources of energy are glycolysis, which converts glucose to energy, and beta-oxidation, which converts fat to energy. A Short Metabolic Digression Explaining The Above (Optional) Strictly speaking, glycolysis is the Continue reading >>

Homemade Keto Electrolyte Drink – Instant Relief Of Keto-flu Symptomes

Homemade Keto Electrolyte Drink – Instant Relief Of Keto-flu Symptomes

I’m writing this article because I feel like there it’s not given enough importance to such a meaningful subject like electrolytes in a ketogenic diet. If you are experiencing one or more symptoms from the list below and you are following a low carb/ ketogenic way of eating, you have for sure an electrolyte deficiency. Electrolytes deficiency it’s common on a super strict low carb diet. Today I’m going to show you how you can make an electrolyte drink at home that will release the “keto flu” symptoms instantly. You don’t have to spend enormous amounts of money on sports drink that are full of sugars and nasty ingredients. What are the signs of the lack of electrolytes? Weakness Tiredness Dizziness Nausea Headache Fatigue Twitching Confusion Anxiety Irritability Muscle Weakness Leg Cramps Constipation The electrolytes are sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and chloride. YES, you can get them from natural sources like avocado ( potassium), green leafy greens, mushrooms etc. For as long as you include so little carbs in your diet, you should always take care to get enough electrolytes. Otherwise, you experience the symptoms above. When you switch to a low-carb diet, your kidney switches from retaining salt to rapidly excreting it. The body is getting rid of excess water and salt, which is a good thing. From the book “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living”: Low carb diets are natriuretic – they make the kidneys dump sodium. Sodium deficiency can cause headache, dizziness, and fatigue. With continued low carb intake and sodium restriction, at some point, your kidneys start to excrete potassium to conserve sodium. Potassium deficiency can lead to muscle cramps, cardiac dysrhythmia. It can also cause the body to lose muscle, even when there’s Continue reading >>

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

This is not a “feel-good” post. We are going to talk about some of the not-so-pleasant side effects of transitioning into ketosis, especially looking at why ketones (and transitioning to ketosis, in general) can cause stomach pain. We will also talk about what you can do to solve the issues. Some are practical solutions; others have to do with summoning the mental strength to just deal with a little discomfort to get the rewards and results you want. If Captain Jack Sparrow were doing the ketogenic diet, he would probably say. “The stomach pain is not the problem… it’s your attitude about the stomach pain which is the problem.” I’ve been there too. The first time I ever tried exogenous ketones, I was about 16 hours removed from carbohydrates (In-N-Out burger) and I was feeling awful. I thought Perfect Keto would make it all better. I took a heaping scoop of Peaches and Cream and waited 30 minutes. The results? Significant stomach issues, to put it kindly. I thought surely these ketones are bad and I quit my attempt to “go keto” on the spot. Why Ketosis Causes Stomach Pain The short answer is dehydration. The process of keto-adaptation is going to dehydrate us. Remember that one purpose of taking exogenous ketones is to speed up keto-adaptation. This means taking ketones will also speed up the side-effects of keto-adaptation. Why Does Ketosis Dehydrate? Transitioning to keto means we are moving from using glycogen and carbs to using fat and ketones. There are two reasons this dehydrates us. 1) One of the main inefficiencies with glycogen and carbs is that it must be stored with water. It takes 4 grams of water to store a gram of glycogen.[1] As you run through your glycogen you will lose tons of water (not literally tons but you get the point). 2) High Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Source Ketosis is the name for a state achieved on a low-carbohydrate diet. According to WebMD, when you are in ketosis, it means your body is burning fat for energy. When that happens, your body releases ketones into your bloodstream, and you are in ketosis. This state may cause a host of temporary symptoms. Understanding the Symptoms Many dieters develop symptoms that let them know ketones are present. For many people beginning a low-carb diet, ketosis kicks in after a few days of strict adherence to the diet. In fact, many low-carbohydrate plans, such as Atkins and paleo, have an initial phase in which dieters take in extremely low amounts of carbohydrates (usually less than 25 grams per day) to kick start ketosis. You can test for ketones in the urine using ketosis strips, or rely on symptoms to tell you ketosis has been achieved. Early Stages Symptoms of ketosis vary, depending how long you've been in the state. In the early stages, the symptoms may be a bit unpleasant. However, as your body adapts to ketones in the bloodstream, symptoms may decrease. Early symptoms usually last for several days or up to a week in some people. This period of symptoms is sometimes called the keto flu. It may continue until your body is used to burning fat instead of glucose. Afterwards, the levels of ketones should lessen, but that doesn't mean you aren't losing weight. It means your body has found a balance and is no longer producing excess ketones. According to Diet Doctor, early stage symptoms include: Flu-like symptoms, such as fatigue and headache Nausea Brain fog Constipation Leg cramps Feeling unusually thirsty Irritability Heart palpitations Dry mouth Ketosis breath, which smells fruity and unpleasant Decreased energy and weakness Dizziness Sleep problems Cold hands and feet Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

The Keto Flu: Common Keto Diet Side Effects & 6 Feel Better Remedies

The Keto Flu: Common Keto Diet Side Effects & 6 Feel Better Remedies

Have you ever heard of the keto flu before? Also known as induction flu, you may be experiencing it and not even know! The keto flu can happen when you all of the sudden remove carbs from your diet. The name stems from the ketogenic diet, a very low carb, high fat diet people use to lose weight. In the keto diet, you basically replace your carb intake with fat, and in turn, your body becomes efficient at burning fat for energy. The keto flu is also known as the carb flu or low carb flu (as you can see, it goes by name names), and happens when your body switches from burning glucose to burning fat. Symptoms like nausea, dizziness and drowsiness often occur as your body’s natural reaction to removing carbs from your diet. But don’t fret, it won’t last forever. What is Keto Flu? To dig a little deeper, it’s important to first point out that the keto flu doesn’t affect everyone. If you recently started a low carb diet such as keto and aren’t experiencing any symptoms, you’re one of the lucky ones! And when the flu does hit, it affects every person a little differently. They call it the keto flu because you experience flu-like symptoms when you’re on it. Your body is used to getting carbs from the foods you eat, so when it no longer does, it’s not always able to change your body’s energy source right away. The keto flu may also occur due to electrolyte deficiency. When you switch to a keto diet you’re filling your body with wholesome foods and cutting out processed foods, which can lead to lower electrolytes. People with the keto flu usually feel pretty crappy, and some even say it’s so bad because it’s basically a withdrawal from carbohydrates. And since sugar is a form of carbs, that’s definitely not surprising. If you’re feeling low energy, i Continue reading >>

Switching To A Keto Diet? Beware Of The ‘flu!’

Switching To A Keto Diet? Beware Of The ‘flu!’

A ketogenic (or simply, keto) diet involves a drastic reduction in carb intake and replacing it with fat. A small pilot study involving 11 women found that a low-calorie ketogenic diet led to significant improvement in weight. It also decreased levels of circulating male hormones, improved the LH/FSH ratio and decreased free insulin in women with PCOS. However, when you go on a keto diet, you may experience some short-term discomfort, known as keto flu. What is Keto Flu? Our normal diets are carb-heavy. We consume about 60% carbs in our diets every day, which serve as our primary source of energy. A shift to a diet that has only around 5% carbs is bound to affect our body until it gets used to it. Your body has always used glucose to burn as fuel and now it has to get used to using ketones. This transition period is referred to as “keto adaptation.” Keto flu literally feels as if you have got the flu. Symptoms Of Keto Flu Brain fog Dizziness Fatigue Insomnia Cravings and increased hunger Racing heart, usually when lying down Nausea Digestive discomforts, etc. When and How Does Keto Flu Start? Brain fogginess starts around the second or third day of going on a keto diet. Your brain is designed to run on glucose. If you do not give enough glucose but an alternative fuel to your brain, it gets confused for a while trying to adapt to this new fuel. You’ll find it difficult to concentrate and feel lethargic. Headaches, nausea and muscle cramps follow. Constipation may occur a couple of days later as you have cut down on a lot of fibrous foods, such as beans, legumes, and whole grains, which you were eating earlier. Ketosis is known for its diuretic effect and you may also get dehydrated. You might also feel decreased strength and endurance. Remedies For Keto Flu Keto f Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Keto Flu Symptoms With Remedies From The Top Keto Blogs

Keto Flu Symptoms With Remedies From The Top Keto Blogs

A ketosis diet is a powerful tool for health and weight loss. But, it can seem difficult, especially at the beginning. One of the largest problems is the ‘keto flu’. This doesn’t affect everyone but most people will experience it to some degree or another. So, what are the keto flu symptoms? And, more importantly, how do you get past the ‘flu’? This post will answer all of those questions and get you started on the right track. To do so, I’ve searched the web for top bloggers who talk about the ketosis diet. These are people who are passionate about keto and have personal experience. In this post, they share their top tips for getting past the keto flu, including what has worked for them personally. These different opinions are critical. After all, the keto experience is different for each person and the best solution for one person may not work for another. The ‘keto flu’ is basically a form of withdrawal. You’re switching from carbs as an energy source to fat instead. To do so, your body needs to adjust. The symptoms come from this adjustment, along with various electrolyte and hormone imbalances that occur as well. Even so, the keto flu isn’t a bad thing. Becoming fat fueled is why a keto diet is so powerful and your body will need to adapt. What the keto flu looks like varies considerably. Some people will experience mild symptoms, others will go through a more severe version. But, however bad it is – the keto flu will pass. Common keto flu symptoms: And, let me be clear, the keto flu is not long-term. Some people experience it for a day or two, others may have some symptoms for a week or more. It isn’t an indication of what the ketosis diet will feel like. In fact, once people get past this initial phase, they tend to find that they have inc Continue reading >>

Quick Guide To Keto-flu Remedies

Quick Guide To Keto-flu Remedies

Hi Everybody, Together with out talented designer Ola, we created yet another infographic for you. It explains what keto-flu is, who may experience it and how to lessen the common symptoms like headaches or muscle cramps. I've had keto-flu myself so I know how bad it can make you feel. Once you give up most carbs, make sure you include foods like avocados (potassium), nuts (magnesium), bone broth or sauerkraut (sodium) in your diet. If you want to learn more, have a look at my post here: "Keto-flu" and Sufficient Intake of Electrolytes Please, feel free to pin it and share it with your friends. You can find the Carbs vs Fat infographic here. Have any comments? Let us know! :-) Do you like this post? Share it with your friends! I changed the way I ate in 2011, when I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid. I had no energy, and I found it more and more difficult to maintain a healthy weight. That’s when I decided to quit sugar, grains, and processed foods, and to start following a whole-foods-based ketogenic approach to food. Continue reading >>

Keto Flu And Electrolyte Imbalance [so Important!]

Keto Flu And Electrolyte Imbalance [so Important!]

Keto Flu and Electrolyte Imbalance [SO IMPORTANT!] Keto flu! If youve been following a very low carb diet and any of the following sound intimately familiar, theres a good chance you have the dreaded keto flu. Im shaky today, and my head hurts. Im feeling pretty weak today. I have a terrible headache!! And feeling shaky What have I done?! More than a few times I have felt like shaky and dizzy like I was going to pass out. Im shaky, headache, heart is fluttery is this normal? Severe leg cramps while sleeping? Calf muscles are constricting and waking me up! Been keto for four weeks now. The last couple weeks Ive been getting Charlie horses at night. What can I do to fix this?! You may be wondering, What kind of medieval torture is this? Why would anyone subject themselves to this willingly? All of the above are comments seen on the daily in keto forums. Doubleplusungood AF right? If I were a newbie, seeing this would likely make me run for the hills. Yes, all these symptoms are normal when youre experiencing whats commonly referred to as keto flu. However, for the sake of all thats ACTUALLY flu, Ill refer to it as what it actually is: electrolyte imbalance. Im petty like that, #sorrynotsorry. Luckily for you, there is a way to avoid all this yuckiness and lead a cramp-headache-shaky-flutter-brainfog-free keto lifestyle. Electrolytes are minerals present in your body, necessary for the proper functioning of your heart, muscles, and nerves and to carry out and regulate a number of processes such as maintaining your bloods chemistry and muscle action. They are obtained from either food or drink. What happens to electrolytes when you restrict carbohydrates in your diet? Your kidneys shift from retaining water and sodium to dumping both at a faster rate! Due to homeostasis, o Continue reading >>

What Is Keto-flu??

What Is Keto-flu??

Sustained, long-term ketosis can have side effects in some individuals, but these are usually easily managed and are most common during the first few months, when the individual is gradually becoming keto-adapted. Most of the problems people have with the ketogenic diet are experienced early on and can usually be remedied by proper hydration and mineral supplementation. – Dr. Dominic D’Agostino (research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition) As you transition from burning glucose for energy to producing ketones, you may experience a “cross-over” point that brings some undesirable side effects. This phase is often referred to as “keto-flu” and it is temporary. As glucose levels dip, you may experience constipation, carb cravings, muscle aches, headaches, diarrhea and gas, disrupted sleep, bad breath, increased urination, and mental fogginess. It’s important to realize that you may or may not experience any of these, but even if you do, it’s normal and likely won’t last more than a week or two. If these symptoms persist longer than a few weeks, you may have never reached nutritional ketosis and you’re stuck in purgatory between being a sugar-burner and a fat-burner. Adjust your diet accordingly to ensure you reach ketosis as quickly as possible. The ketogenic diet improves your insulin sensitivity. Thus, insulin levels will drop quickly without the reintroduction of carbohydrates and your kidneys will begin to dump excess fluids. Combine this with the fact that glycogen stores excess water, so the removal of said glycogen results in a decline in water weight. The result is the need to urinate….a lot. It’s important to realize that you need to increase sodium intake to compensate for the extreme loss of sodium as you excrete th Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

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