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Keto Flu Muscle Aches

Homemade Keto Electrolyte Drink – Instant Relief Of Keto-flu Symptomes

Homemade Keto Electrolyte Drink – Instant Relief Of Keto-flu Symptomes

I’m writing this article because I feel like there it’s not given enough importance to such a meaningful subject like electrolytes in a ketogenic diet. If you are experiencing one or more symptoms from the list below and you are following a low carb/ ketogenic way of eating, you have for sure an electrolyte deficiency. Electrolytes deficiency it’s common on a super strict low carb diet. Today I’m going to show you how you can make an electrolyte drink at home that will release the “keto flu” symptoms instantly. You don’t have to spend enormous amounts of money on sports drink that are full of sugars and nasty ingredients. What are the signs of the lack of electrolytes? Weakness Tiredness Dizziness Nausea Headache Fatigue Twitching Confusion Anxiety Irritability Muscle Weakness Leg Cramps Constipation The electrolytes are sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and chloride. YES, you can get them from natural sources like avocado ( potassium), green leafy greens, mushrooms etc. For as long as you include so little carbs in your diet, you should always take care to get enough electrolytes. Otherwise, you experience the symptoms above. When you switch to a low-carb diet, your kidney switches from retaining salt to rapidly excreting it. The body is getting rid of excess water and salt, which is a good thing. From the book “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living”: Low carb diets are natriuretic – they make the kidneys dump sodium. Sodium deficiency can cause headache, dizziness, and fatigue. With continued low carb intake and sodium restriction, at some point, your kidneys start to excrete potassium to conserve sodium. Potassium deficiency can lead to muscle cramps, cardiac dysrhythmia. It can also cause the body to lose muscle, even when there’s Continue reading >>

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

Keto Flu: An In-depth Guide To Beating It

When starting a ketogenic diet, some people experience initial side effects from carbohydrate restriction known as ‘keto flu.’ These symptoms can have some mild and potentially severe effects on the body. While the condition is popularly known as keto flu, people also commonly refer to it as induction flu, low carb flu, and Atkins flu. This article will explain what it is, why it happens, and the best strategies for avoiding or beating it. What is the Keto Flu? Firstly, it is not the real flu. It just shares the name because it has several of the same symptoms. Coming from a high carbohydrate diet, the body is well-adapted to using glucose for fuel. However, when restricting carbohydrate, the supply of glucose falls before the body has adapted to burning fat for fuel. In other words, your body is in ketosis but not fully keto-adapted. If you are curious about this, you can find out your level of ketosis by using ketone strips. The liver and gall-bladder need time to upregulate the number of fat-burning enzymes to burn larger amounts of fat efficiently. Severely restricting carbohydrate is a massive change to the way the body works and your body needs time to adjust to the metabolic changes. When Does it Start? There is no exact timeframe, but symptoms may appear as quickly as 10-12 hours after starting to restrict carbohydrate. For some people, it might be slightly earlier or later. Of course, there are also people who won’t experience the dreaded keto flu at all. How Long Does it Last? Based on anecdotes, this induction flu lasts somewhere between two days and about two weeks. The worst symptoms appear in the first few days and then taper off. Regarding the intensity of the symptoms, this likely depends on the previous diet, hormonal state, and prior carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets & Muscle Aches In The Legs

Low-carb Diets & Muscle Aches In The Legs

Low-carbohydrate diets can lead to weight loss, but they are not without risk. If you cut your carb intake too low or you eliminate certain food choices completely, you may find yourself struggling with muscle aches, pains or cramps. Tweaking your diet to address the reasons behind aching and cramping can help. However, if your muscle aches become concerning or do not subside over time, contact your doctor. Video of the Day If you are very active, your muscle aches may be occurring due to a lack of carbs. Your body stores carbs in the muscles in the form of glycogen, which is used during exercise for energy production along with stored fat. The proportion of fat and carbs used for fuel during exercise varies depending on the intensity. Higher-intensity exercises, like interval training, rely more heavily on stored glycogen. If you are not eating enough carbs to give your muscles the energy they need, you will likely struggle through your workout routine and end up with sore, achy muscles in the following days. The only two fixes for this problem are to increase the amount of carbs you eat each day or to reduce the intensity of your workouts. Initial Dehydration The initial weight loss in low-carb diets is mostly water weight, as carbs are stored in the muscles with molecules of water. A significant reduction in carb intake and concurrent weight loss may result in mild dehydration. Some researchers believe dehydration may play a role in muscle aches and cramps. To address this issue, stay well hydrated every day. The Institute of Medicine recommends men drink approximately 3 liters and women approximately 2.2 liters of fluid per day for optimal hydration. Lack of Potassium If your muscle ache occurs as a cramping sensation, then the problem could be a lack of potassium. Continue reading >>

Switching To A Keto Diet? Beware Of The ‘flu!’

Switching To A Keto Diet? Beware Of The ‘flu!’

A ketogenic (or simply, keto) diet involves a drastic reduction in carb intake and replacing it with fat. A small pilot study involving 11 women found that a low-calorie ketogenic diet led to significant improvement in weight. It also decreased levels of circulating male hormones, improved the LH/FSH ratio and decreased free insulin in women with PCOS. However, when you go on a keto diet, you may experience some short-term discomfort, known as keto flu. What is Keto Flu? Our normal diets are carb-heavy. We consume about 60% carbs in our diets every day, which serve as our primary source of energy. A shift to a diet that has only around 5% carbs is bound to affect our body until it gets used to it. Your body has always used glucose to burn as fuel and now it has to get used to using ketones. This transition period is referred to as “keto adaptation.” Keto flu literally feels as if you have got the flu. Symptoms Of Keto Flu Brain fog Dizziness Fatigue Insomnia Cravings and increased hunger Racing heart, usually when lying down Nausea Digestive discomforts, etc. When and How Does Keto Flu Start? Brain fogginess starts around the second or third day of going on a keto diet. Your brain is designed to run on glucose. If you do not give enough glucose but an alternative fuel to your brain, it gets confused for a while trying to adapt to this new fuel. You’ll find it difficult to concentrate and feel lethargic. Headaches, nausea and muscle cramps follow. Constipation may occur a couple of days later as you have cut down on a lot of fibrous foods, such as beans, legumes, and whole grains, which you were eating earlier. Ketosis is known for its diuretic effect and you may also get dehydrated. You might also feel decreased strength and endurance. Remedies For Keto Flu Keto f Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

Keto Flu A-z: Causes, Symptoms & How To Get Over It For Good!

Keto Flu A-z: Causes, Symptoms & How To Get Over It For Good!

Keto flu: the ugly side of Ketogenic diet. Most people suffering from keto flu symptoms say things like “It feels like death”. Are you one of them? Well, rest assured knowing you’re not alone. But guess what? Keto flu is not actual flu, yeah the symptoms are pretty similar if not worse but it’s not the one caused by any flu viruses. It’s more like the side effects of Ketogenic diet. And guess what? Had you done some deep research prior to starting your keto diet, you could have avoided it by at least 80%. But it’s not too late. Once you finish reading this article, you will have a better idea of what causes Keto flu and how to get rid of it for good. What is Keto Flu? As far as medical research is concerned, the term ‘keto flu’ does not exist. BUT, it’s real. As mentioned before, It’s not real flu but some of the symptoms of keto flu are pretty similar to normal flu and that’s probably how it got its name. Before we get started, I just want to remind you that you’re not alone. The majority of people on the ketogenic diet go through keto flu at some point. You will feel crap, you will feel like it’s never going to go away and you’ll feel like giving up, but DON’T. Once your body gets adapted to ketosis, you will feel 100 times better and it will all be worth it. What are the signs and symptoms of Keto Flu? You may experience some or all of these symptoms. Headache Nausea: Remember, it will only get worse if you avoid eating. If you’re not feeling hungry because you feel nauseous and exhausted, remind yourself you must eat to get better. Dizziness Exhaustion Brain fog: Feeling like you can’t recall simple stuff or focus on your day to day activities properly? Do you feel like you can’t concentrate on a single thing? Lethargic Cravings F Continue reading >>

Got The Keto Flu? Here’s 7 Easy Ways To Deal With It

Got The Keto Flu? Here’s 7 Easy Ways To Deal With It

Diets can be ideal for shedding weight or kickstarting healthier habits. But, sometimes making significant changes can have a real impact on your body. Among the popular diets around today is a Ketogenic Diet (Keto Diet). A low-carb diet designed to help you lose weight, give you more energy and reduce the amount of acne you might be suffering from. If you’ve started a ketogenic diet recently, perhaps even for the first time, there’s a good chance that you might be feeling a bit tired and lethargic. If you’re curious as to what this is, these are symptoms of a collective experience known as the keto flu. What is the Keto Flu? Essentially, it’s your body’s reaction to dealing with a low-carbohydrate diet. When starting out on the Keto Diet, due to the minimal carbohydrate intake, your body is effectively adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose writes Lilja in a post on Lilja’s Low Carb Food List. Although not everyone will experience the Keto Flu, if you’re used to filling up on foods with carbohydrates it’s likely you will experience symptoms of the Keto Flu. One of the main reasons for this is because carbohydrates (carbs) are like drugs. Besides, who hasn’t been a little addicted to bread and cake? The problem is, when you take them away, your body probably won’t be very happy for the first few days—or even weeks while you’re adapting to it. These carb withdrawal symptoms are not the actual ‘flu,’ but it will certainly feel like it. Just ask the people voicing their discomfort on Twitter. Nobody warned me about keto flu. Nobody. — Lucy (@LucyMuckyKnees) January 15, 2017 Keto flu is the worrrrst — Doug Chipponeri (@dougigem) December 20, 2016 The keto flu phase can last from a few days to a week or even longer. But, rest assured, Continue reading >>

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

This is not a “feel-good” post. We are going to talk about some of the not-so-pleasant side effects of transitioning into ketosis, especially looking at why ketones (and transitioning to ketosis, in general) can cause stomach pain. We will also talk about what you can do to solve the issues. Some are practical solutions; others have to do with summoning the mental strength to just deal with a little discomfort to get the rewards and results you want. If Captain Jack Sparrow were doing the ketogenic diet, he would probably say. “The stomach pain is not the problem… it’s your attitude about the stomach pain which is the problem.” I’ve been there too. The first time I ever tried exogenous ketones, I was about 16 hours removed from carbohydrates (In-N-Out burger) and I was feeling awful. I thought Perfect Keto would make it all better. I took a heaping scoop of Peaches and Cream and waited 30 minutes. The results? Significant stomach issues, to put it kindly. I thought surely these ketones are bad and I quit my attempt to “go keto” on the spot. Why Ketosis Causes Stomach Pain The short answer is dehydration. The process of keto-adaptation is going to dehydrate us. Remember that one purpose of taking exogenous ketones is to speed up keto-adaptation. This means taking ketones will also speed up the side-effects of keto-adaptation. Why Does Ketosis Dehydrate? Transitioning to keto means we are moving from using glycogen and carbs to using fat and ketones. There are two reasons this dehydrates us. 1) One of the main inefficiencies with glycogen and carbs is that it must be stored with water. It takes 4 grams of water to store a gram of glycogen.[1] As you run through your glycogen you will lose tons of water (not literally tons but you get the point). 2) High Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Is Ketosis Safe And Does It Have Side Effects?

Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. First, it's necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven't eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn't happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to "adapt" to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the "low-carb flu" or "keto flu." In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead of carbs. It can take some time for your body to adapt to this. In the beginning of ketosis, you may experience a range of negative symptoms. They are often referred to as "low-carb flu" or "keto flu" because they resemble symptom Continue reading >>

"low Carb Flu" What Was Your Experience?

I've seen quite a few of newcomers to PaleoHacks. In order to help them out, I thought sharing each other's "Low carb flu" experiences might help keep them on the right path. Everyone is different, so a good broad range of answers would likely help a lot of people. I personally had a longer low carb flu experience than most of the stories I've read on this site. I want to say mine lasted a couple months. The symptoms I dealt with were, sugar cravings, fatigue, overall downtick in happiness (definitely not depression though) and a noticable decrease in performance. Looking back, I would say I was probably still scared of the dreaded "fat", and as such, did not consume enough of it. Also, I think trying to maintain a ridiculous exercise schedule throughout the process (Chronic cardio + weight training) and not embracing the importance of quality sleep factored in. So I ask, Did you go through a low carb flu, and if so, what was it like? EDIT: Added link - link text Continue reading >>

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

What Does Lower Back Pain Have In Common With Low Carb Eating?

What Does Lower Back Pain Have In Common With Low Carb Eating?

Strange question, huh? Before you get too excited, I’m not about to tell you that a low carbohydrate diet is a remedy for back pain. Instead, I am going to explain a remarkably parallel experience I’ve had. I never made the connection until this week when a reader asked an unrelated question about lower back pain. The best, worst experience of my life As my third year of medical school was winding down, and I was just about to embark on a bold fourth year curriculum of back-to-back-to-back-to-back surgical sub-internships, I was on top of the world. I was 27 years old, living in Palo Alto, California with my best friends, I had a wonderful girlfriend, I was working hard to prepare for my application to a surgical residency, and I still found time to work out like a wannabe Olympian. What more could I ask for? One sunny, June afternoon I got out of the pool after a good workout and felt a very strange pain in my lower back. After riding my bike a few hundred yards to the weight room, it wasn’t getting better. Actually, it was getting worse. So bad, in fact, I did something I’d never done before – I decided to skip my workout and pedal home. I iced my back, took some ibuprofen, and went to bed. The next morning I woke up only to realize I literally could not get out of bed. After struggling for some time I had to call my roommate to get me out of bed and help me to the bathroom. I called my chief resident and apologized that I would not be able to come in to the hospital that day, and assured him I’d be fine the next day. But I wasn’t. Nor was I fine the day after or the day after. A few days later I managed to limp my way into the hospital for rounds and with the help of the residents and nurses who were kind enough to give me intramuscular injections of a Continue reading >>

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