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Keto Flu Fever

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Here Are The Keto Flu Symptoms And How To Beat Them

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard from a few low carbers who had questions about some issues they experienced. They all say that they had rapid weight loss, but some had severe headaches, some had joint pains, one even claimed they had diarrhea. One lady thought that I didn’t know these diets can do this, but alas I was fully prepared. These people were suffering from dreaded keto flu symptoms. Not only was she wrong in assuming I didn’t know about these pains, I’ve actually experienced all of these over the last few years. Some of these are easier to manage than others, but any one of these will send you running to the nearest fast food restaurant. That’s why I wanted to write everything I know about the keto flu and how to get over each of these common symptoms. Update: If you take a look at the comments section, you’ll see that MCT oil is my recommendation for many of the issues people ask about. So, I decided to write a few posts on what it is and why you HAVE to include MCT in your diet. Here’s the first post! Keto Flu Symptoms The format for this post will be where I list each of the common symptoms and I’ll describe it as best as I can. After that, I’ll write everything I know about how to beat the pain. Most of my recommendations come from my own experience while others will be from trusted sources. Also, I’ll continue to update this page as people reply with more symptoms. The Ketosis Headache Often describe as a migraine, the ketosis headache is one of the most painful of the keto flu symptoms – in my opinion. This mostly occurs in the first 24-76 hours of an LC diet. People suffering from this describe the pain as being in the head but hard to pinpoint it to any particular region. The entire outer head feels stuffy and the pain is ofte Continue reading >>

Induction Flu

Induction Flu

Those of us who have done low-carb for years are happy to sing the praises of the low-carb lifestyle--decreased weight and increased energy, plus improvements in blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL and blood glucose numbers. But in much the same way that the joy of having a new baby diminishes our memory of the pain of childbirth, we find it easy to forget that one of the aspects of low-carbing is very hard. It's called Induction flu, or Atkins flu. On the Standard American Diet (very aptly named the SAD diet) we are used to eating low fat, moderate protein and high carbohydrate. Our body's primary source of energy comes from the burning of hundreds of grams of carbohydrates we consume every day. When we change from a SAD diet to a low-carb diet, we abruptly remove the macronutrient that has provided most of our energy. Eventually our energy will come from the fat we eat, but in the meantime our bodies have a huge transition to make. Every nucleated cell in our body contains 46 chromosomes with over 3 billion base pairs of DNA. In that DNA is the information needed to make the enzymes required for us to metabolize both carbohydrates and fats into energy. Although the information is there, it is not translated into enzymes unless those enzymes are actually needed. A person eating a SAD diet will have all the enzymes he or she needs to convert carbohydrates into energy, but very few of the enzymes needed to convert fat into energy. Typically a low-carb diet is begun at a level of 20 to 30 grams of carbohydrate a day. Suddenly the carbohydrate conversion enzymes no longer have a substrate. They initiate Plan B, which is to utilize the glycogen stored in the liver and muscle tissue. Glycogen is converted to glucose, which is converted to energy. After about a day, glycogen i Continue reading >>

The Science Behind The “low Carb Flu”, And How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility

The Science Behind The “low Carb Flu”, And How To Regain Your Metabolic Flexibility

Important note!my 2013 AHS presentation “What Is Metabolic Flexibility, And Why Is It Important?” Most of us who eat a low-carbohydrate diet—Paleo, Primal, Atkins, or otherwise—experience anywhere from a couple days to a couple weeks of low energy as we adjust to it, an experience known informally as the “low carb flu”. And some people never seem to adjust. Here’s why—and here are some ideas that might help you if you’re having trouble adjusting! Note that low-carb isn’t an objective of a paleo diet: it’s just the usual consequence of eliminating grains and sugars. It’s certainly possible to eat a higher-carb paleo diet—and it’s a good idea if you’re doing frequent, intense workouts like HIIT, Crossfit, or team sports after school—but you’d have to eat a lot of potatoes and bananas to get anywhere near the same amount of carbohydrate you used to get from bread, pasta, cereal, and soda. Burning Food For Energy: Glycolysis and Beta-Oxidation Our bodies have several ways to turn stored or ingested energy into the metabolic energy required to move around and stay alive. This is called cellular respiration. The two main types of cellular respiration are anaerobic (which does not require oxygen) and aerobic (which requires oxygen). Anaerobic metabolism, also known as fermentation, is nineteen times less efficient—and we can only maintain it for short periods, because its waste products build up very quickly. This is why we can’t sprint for long distances. We spend most of our time in aerobic metabolism. Our two primary aerobic sources of energy are glycolysis, which converts glucose to energy, and beta-oxidation, which converts fat to energy. A Short Metabolic Digression Explaining The Above (Optional) Strictly speaking, glycolysis is the Continue reading >>

What Is Carb Flu, & How Do You Treat It?

What Is Carb Flu, & How Do You Treat It?

When you find yourself sniffling and coughing as the weather goes from rays of sunshine to crisp fall breezes, you might head to your doc for an annual flu shot. Though, sure, a change in temperature can cause an infection, you can also get flu-like symptoms from a transformation in your diet. Surprisingly, some of the setbacks from restricting a specific type of food can be detrimental, not only to your metabolism but to your overall health and vitality too. One of the more common ailments many dieters suffer from is known as carb flu — which Dr. Keith-Thomas Ayoob, the associate clinical professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, says is actually better called "low-carb flu." Just as the name suggests, this is related to how many or how few carbohydrates you’re consuming. Here, experts shed light on what carb flu is and why you should be wary of it when attempting to improve your eating habits or drop pounds. More: Is Low-Carb Better Than Low-Calorie Dieting? What is carb flu? Ayoob adds that in addition to being called the low-carb flu, you might also hear these same symptoms called "keto flu." When might you expect to experience this? When you go on a very low-carb diet, cutting out even good-for-you carbohydrates from all meals and supplements. This causes your body to perform differently and work double-time to function. “You can feel a variety of symptoms that mimic the flu, from headache and lethargy and feeling weak to constipation or diarrhea,” Ayoob explains. You might also suffer from a brain fog, where you can’t seem to concentrate or focus on the task at hand. While he stresses that you won’t have a fever from the carb flu, it can wreak havoc in your day-to-day performance at work. What causes it? Because all bodies need the appropriate Continue reading >>

Cheating And You

Cheating And You

Cheating, or eating hidden carbs, whatever you want to call it. Let’s have a brief talk. What is cheating? Cheating is, in the most simple terms, eating a lot more carbs than you would normally. There’s no hard and fast figure, suffice to say that if you had somewhere in the realm of 50g – 100g you would likely break your ketosis, but it wouldn’t be the end of the world. It also stands to reason that you would possibly not have to go through unpleasant keto-flu again. How does it happen? Cheating can happen for a number of reasons, but there seem to be two main causes. Emotions Alcohol Comfort eating is something everyone I know does, and I’ll admit to eating an entire pint of Ben & Jerry’s on my own, no problems at all, when feeling down. Though those days are also long gone. You could be stressed, sad, angry, or any number of other things, and may choose to seek comfort in sugary foods. After all, they raise your mood, though it’s only short term. You’ll probably feel down that you’ve stalled your progress or simply eaten foods that aren’t great for your body. You might even drink alcohol for a range of the same reasons, or, as is very often the case, it may be a social event. A birthday, after work drinks, oh how I could go on… One thing’s for sure, too much can and will impair judgement. The last time I cheated was definitely after a few refreshments and I said “Hey, you know what, chocolate is a GREAT IDEA!” But it wasn’t really. You’ll Feel Like a Failure – But that’s OK! The worst part is knowing that you’ve failed, but you must remember that it’s ok to fail, if you don’t, then you’re probably not doing a lot of trying or learning. I recently read some great advice on failing. It stressed one point, and one point only, Continue reading >>

The Dreaded Keto Flu

The Dreaded Keto Flu

For all the excellent benefits of the ketogenic lifestyle, getting there can be a physically rough road. The primary reason for this is what is known as the “keto flu”. Almost everyone who has changed their life to the healthy ketogenic lifestyle has had to deal with the keto flu, and some have had a worse deal than others. Background The keto flu is the common name for the induction phase of ketogenesis. That means it’s the period of time when your body is getting used to the changes you have made to what you eat. When you change what you eat, you change everything about how your body operates and functions. Inside your gut (where close to 70% of your immune system lives) are billions of bacteria, and they are all battling for dominance. If your diet consists of highly refined carbs, the types of bacteria that thrive in your gut (e. coli, h. pylori, candida a, etc.) will be inflammatory and detrimental to your immune system. By changing your diet to be high in fat, those same bacteria die off rapidly, because they don’t have their preferred energy source. This massive bacteria death has consequences. These consequences are typically: Diarrhea Headaches Nausea Lack of mental focus and clarity Fatigue In short: You feel like you have the flu. That’s because, in a way, you do. Your immune system is taking a beating when you make the change, because it has grown accustomed to the way things have been. But once you get through the induction phase, and you start to feel better, your immune system will be several times stronger and more efficient. That’s one of the reason that Ketovangelists don’t get sick (and when they do, it’s not nearly as bad as it could have been). Changing Fuel Sources The best way to think about what you’re doing to your body is to i Continue reading >>

All About The “low-carb Flu”

All About The “low-carb Flu”

What is “Low carb flu”? If you’ve ever dramatically reduced your carbohydrate intake, you might have felt it already: it’s that first few days of headaches, brain fog, crankiness, and constant, dragging exhaustion. At some point, you know the magic is going to happen and you’ll start feeling like a human being again, but the transition period is really rough. It feels like having the flu (hence the name), only you’re not sick; you’re just cutting carbs. Low-carb flu can include any of the following: You feel fuzzy and foggy, like your brain just isn’t working right. You might have a pounding or throbbing headache. You’re exhausted, cranky, and irritable for no reason. Going to the gym feels like an insurmountable challenge. If you do make it, your performance is completely down the drain. You’re ravenously hungry, tearing into everything in sight. You’re craving anything with carbs – bagels, pasta, pizza, sandwiches, mashed potatoes, candy… So what gives? Isn’t Paleo supposed to make you feel better, not worse? Yes it is – and yes it will, eventually. But for some people, there’s an initial period of adaptation while your body switches tracks. Here’s how it works: At any given time, your body can be burning either fat or carbohydrates for energy, but given a choice, it’ll start with carbs. If you eat a mixed meal (say, a potato with butter), you’ll burn the carbs first, and then start working on the fat. Metabolic flexibility is the ability to switch back and forth between carbs and fat for energy without a problem. This is how healthy humans are set up. If you eat a potato with butter, get up, and go along with your day, you’re metabolically flexible. First you burn through the carbohydrates in the potato; then you burn through t Continue reading >>

Glucose And The Stomach Flu—starving A Fever

Glucose And The Stomach Flu—starving A Fever

So I got sick. For the first time in such a long time that I have trouble remembering the last time... That's been one of the biggest benefits of the Paleo diet, as the flu used to visit like clockwork. This one was a stomach bug—it's apparently going around, from the symptoms I'd say it's viral. The immediate sign of it was that the mere thought of food was enough to make me nauseous and dizzy. At which point I decided that instead of getting lunch I would leave the office and go home. Later, in the evening, my daughter broke out some ice cream. That was appealing! After eating a few bites I came down with a fever. Literally, in the middle of eating the bowl of ice cream I started getting chills. 99.5, not huge, but I hadn't had a fever prior to that moment. A few hours later the fever went away. Which got me to thinking: cause and effect? The old saw is "feed a cold, starve a fever". Starvation, of course, leads to a ketogenic state. We have at least one instance of a guy improving a serious viral disease by going on a ketogenic diet. One of the ways your body disposes of excess carbs is by increasing the metabolic rate. Which is basically what a fever is. And the fact that your body can anticipate the effect of glucose on the metabolism is, as they say, well-established. So was my two-hour fever after eating some ice cream my body's way of getting rid of the glucose, which it recognized was counter-productive? I didn't eat anything else until the following evening, and nothing that was high-carb, and the fever didn't come back. But I also didn't try eating more ice cream (which had lost it's appeal after my body reacted to it; I wanted to get better, not conduct an experiment). Of course the doctors will tell you that you should eat when you have a fever, because y Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

What Is Keto Flu? (plus 6 Ways To Cure It)

What Is Keto Flu? (plus 6 Ways To Cure It)

You’re tired and dizzy, you crave sugar, bread, pasta, and your mind wanders like crazy. You just started a ketogenic diet (or a Paleo or other low carb diet) and you’re suspicious if your new diet is making you feeling this crappy. Removing carbohydrates from your diet all of a sudden may well be the reason why you’re barely able to concentrate on this sentence! This can happen even on a Paleo diet if you remove too many carbs from your diet. And all this feeling of crappiness is due to something people call Keto Flu (or Carb Flu). Read on to find out what is keto flu, how long keto flu lasts, and of course, how to cure keto flu. (CARB FLU = KETO FLU) KETO FLU INFOGRAPHIC – please pin! Please feel free to pin and share this infographic about the keto flu. WHAT IS KETO FLU? Keto flu describes the flu-like symptoms that people starting a low-carb diet often experience. These symptoms are caused by your body being too used to receiving carbohydrates from the food you eat and not being able to change your body’s energy source when you stop eating carbs. (If you’re interested in the science, then this article provides a very detailed explanation of why keto flu happens.) Some people explain keto flu as symptoms resulting from withdrawal from carbohydrates (think drug addiction here). And indeed, there are studies showing that sugars (which are a form of carbohydrates) can cause drug-like additions. But don’t panic if you think you have keto flu. I’ve listed several ways to shorten that period of feeling crappy below. WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF KETO FLU? If you just started a low carb or ketogenic diet, then you might experience keto flu symptoms like: Fatigue Sugar cravings Dizziness Difficulty focusing (or Brain Fog) Nausea Difficulty Getting To Sleep Irritab Continue reading >>

Flu Symptoms Timeline

Flu Symptoms Timeline

Read your Flu Timeline below, and then get advice on What to Do. After a few days, the typical paroxysms may occur – chills, followed firstly by a high fever for a few hours, and then by profuse sweating. Drink plenty of fluids. Find out when colds and the flu are most easily spread. Read on to determine when you should stay home with the flu, cold, or allergies. What is keto flu, symptoms of keto flu, what to expect with keto flu, why do. Plus, learn about cold vs. It is only useful if given early after onset of symptoms and may shorten duration of the illness and reduce symptoms. As the illness progresses, a person may have warm, flushed skin, Influenza, commonly known as "the flu", is an infectious disease caused by an influenza virus. Fever is also a good indicator that you're still contagious: “When you have fever and fatigue, May 26, 2016 Uncomplicated influenza illness is characterized by the abrupt onset of constitutional and respiratory signs and symptoms (e. Specific antiviral medication is available. Flu symptoms 28 Nov 2013 You are infected and contagious, but except for an occasional sniffle, still don't know you're sick. They are likely to peak within a few days and taper off while the psychological withdrawal side effects may linger a little longer. Some typical flu symptoms, such as headache and muscle aches, can be hard to detect in kids too young to describe what they're feeling. Pneumonia causes the air sacs at the end of the airways in the lungs to fill with pus. Severity is variable. Development of the flu-related complication Discover more information from Bupa about pneumonia symptoms and treatment options, including how to prevent it by having a vaccine and giving up smoking. However, a second, highly contagious wave of influenza appeared wit Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Should You Stay In Ketosis While Sick?

Should You Stay In Ketosis While Sick?

This is a tough question for those low carbing out there. There is no doubt that ketosis is a fat burning state that forces your body to metabolize food differently. But what about staying in keotsis while sick? Should you call it quits for the week? The month? The answer is a bit more complex. How sick are you? “sick” can mean a variety of different things. If you are having a cold for instance, staying in ketosis should be okay. Symptoms of runny nose, sore throat, cough, mild congestion, mild fever, are all generally manageable with over the counter meds and hydration. Generally if you feel you are up to the task, staying in ketosis when you have the common cold is usually safe and reasonably easy to manage. Some tips and tricks… Sugar Free Cough Drops. Dont forget that cough drops are loaded with sugar, which can throw you out of ketosis. I like to get HALLS Sugar-Free Cough Drops {affiliate link} and only use them when absolutely necessary Other great foods when your sick is homemade chicken zuchini noodle soup, scrambled eggs, pot roast, egg drop soup or basically any low carb soup you can make. Noatmeal is another low carb hot cereal option. Some people prefer to make bullet proof tea instead of bullet proof coffee. Even plain tea is a great option, just try to avoid the honey if you can resist. For a sore throat, sugar free jell-o with whipped cream is always an option for food. If you have more of a flu like sickness, or If you are having more of a stomach upset with nausea and vomiting, then perhaps keeping down what foods you can is better strategy. Sometimes when it is hard to keep anything down, it is better to eat something rather than nothing at all. The tried and true method of ginger ale and crackers is probably one of your best bets. There are op Continue reading >>

Can You Have The Flu Without A Fever?

Can You Have The Flu Without A Fever?

Influenza, or “flu” for short, is an illness caused by the influenza virus. If you have ever had the flu, you know how miserable it can make you feel. The virus attacks your respiratory system and produces many uncomfortable symptoms, which last between one and several days. The flu is not a serious health problem for most people, but if you are elderly, are very young, are pregnant, or have a compromised immune system, the virus can be deadly if not treated. Common flu symptoms | Symptoms Most people who contract the flu virus will experience several symptoms. These include: a fever aches and pains throughout the body headaches chills a sore throat an extreme feeling of fatigue a persistent and worsening cough a stuffy or runny nose Not everyone with the flu has every symptom, and the seriousness of the symptoms varies by individual. A fever is a common symptom of the flu virus, but not everyone who gets the flu will have one. If you do experience a fever with the flu, it is typically high, over 100ºF (37.78ºC), and is partly responsible for why you feel so bad. Treat a case of the flu seriously, even if you don’t have a fever. You are still contagious and your illness could progress and become a real concern, even if your temperature is not elevated. There are many other causes of a fever besides the flu virus. Any type of infection, whether bacterial or viral, can cause you to run a fever. Even being sunburned or experiencing heat exhaustion can elevate your temperature. Some types of cancer, certain medications, vaccines, and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, may also be accompanied by a fever. If you have flu-like symptoms but no fever, you might suspect that you have a cold. It is not always easy to tell the difference, and even a cold c Continue reading >>

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