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Keto Carb Up Day Example

Low Carb Cheat Day

Low Carb Cheat Day

Diet stalls are frustrating. You limit carbs but the scale ignores you. A low carb cheat day may help by shaking up your metabolism. Here’s scientific proof and a plan to do it right. Why cheat days burn more fat How to plan your perfect low carb cheat day The days before and after you cheat How does cheating help? Your body adapts to physical routines and ways of eating – eventually. Diet progress stalls and we plateau. Cheat days shake things up a bit, metabolically speaking. If you’re not seeing progress on low carb, cheating on your diet can help. To get started, schedule six low carb days, followed by one (wonderful) cheat day. When to Cheat on Your Diet Your low carb cheat day allows extra carbs, preferably in the form of slow carbs: sweet potatoes, beans or nuts – foods allowed after the Atkins Induction phase. If you’re just starting Atkins, a low carb cheat day is generally NOT recommended. Wait a few months, see if your progress slows, then revisit the idea. Why Cheat Days Help Burn Fat Low carb cheat days sound counterproductive. Actually, it’s a key to faster fat loss. As our body adapts to routine, leptin levels drop and weight loss slows. Leptin is a hormone that controls metabolism and hunger cravings. After a few weeks of dieting, leptin levels drop and we store more fat. Outsmart Your Metabolism Use a low carb cheat day to outsmart your body. Eating more calories, carbs and fat one day a week raises leptin levels. Raising leptin levels keeps your body primed for rapid fat loss all week. How to Cheat on Your Diet Cheat days boost fat burning and weight loss – but only when you cheat in a sensible way. Have a Plan Budget your calories for what matters most. Track/count the extra carbs you’re eating. Be realistic – don’t go crazy. Don Continue reading >>

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet

A cyclic ketogenic diet (or carb-cycling) is a low-carbohydrate diet with intermittent periods of high or moderate carbohydrate consumption. This is a form of the general ketogenic diet that is used as a way to maximize fat loss while maintaining the ability to perform high-intensity exercise. A ketogenic diet limits the number of grams of carbohydrate the dieter may eat, which may be anywhere between 0 and 50g per day. The remainder of the caloric intake must come primarily from fat sources, as well as protein sources, in order to maintain ketosis. (Ketosis is the condition in which the body burns fats and uses ketones instead of glucose for fuel.) The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet can be complex, as it requires the dieters to closely watch the number of carbohydrate grams they eat during the intermittent period that they are not maintaining a strictly low carb/moderate protein diet.[1] When following a low carbohydrate diet, for the first few days, there is an adaptation period during which most people report feeling run-down or tired. Some people report feeling irritable, out of sorts, and unable to make decisions. For most people these feelings disappear after the adaptation period, however, and are replaced with feelings of calm and balance, and more consistent energy.[1] Although most people report a waning of cravings while in ketosis, some people may crave carbohydrates during ketosis for psychological reasons. During a hypocaloric ketogenic diet, the carb cravings may combine with hunger pangs, making matters worse.[2] (However, it is noteworthy that most people report having no hunger pangs on a ketogenic diet, due to its higher fat and protein contents, which help to increase a sense of fullness).[1] A CKD offers a way to combat this. It offers a cyclical "refeed" Continue reading >>

When To Carb Up On A Ketogenic Diet

When To Carb Up On A Ketogenic Diet

If you’ve been doing the ketogenic diet for long, you may have heard the term “carb up” used. We are going to explain When to Carb Up on a Ketogenic Diet to help you make the most of your recent choice to live a healthier lifestyle and work toward losing weight. When to Carb Up on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is mostly a low-carb and high-protein dietary option. However, many individuals restrict carbohydrates strongly and use what they call a cyclic keto diet by using a few days on a regular basis to “carb up”. Below, I will explain more about the process, and some tips for when you should choose this method. Have you hit a plateau with weight loss? If you have been doing the ketogenic diet for a length of time, your body may be at a point where it just needs a change. That includes those who have lost a lot, but have just a few last pounds to reach their goal. A carb load can switch your body out of ketosis just long enough for the change back to ketosis to boost you back into loosing mode. Are you training regularly for building muscle? Many who are focused on building muscle find that doing a carb up day helps give them the extra boost of energy needed to really push to a goal. This is especially found with those who are preparing for a competition or a marathon of some sort. A carb up day allows them to add extra energy for 1-2 full days to get past that event. Most who do this follow a weekly regimen of ketogenic for a week, then follow that with 1-2 days of carb loading. They may limit this to once a month or do it routinely each week. However, they are using this as part of their high-intensity workout regimen. Do you have the discipline to go back on plan? If you don’t have the discipline to stop and go back on plan after 1-2 days, then this ma Continue reading >>

Advanced Ketogenic Dieting

Advanced Ketogenic Dieting

There is a lot of confusion out there when it comes to ketogenic dieting. All around us we have hundreds of books, so many experts, endless opinions from people who have done it themselves and posted their views online. Right now the water is exceedingly muddied. The goal of this article it to not only give a clear view on the keto protocols but also lay out an sound tried and true protocol along with a systematic way to set it up. Ketogenic Dieting Defined Lets start this off talking about what ketogenic dieting means and doesn’t mean. A lot of people think that keto means eating low carbs. Some people think it means just eating protein. Ketogenic dieting is achieved by getting into ketosis, and that is a process that the body has to go through. Eating low carbs or only eating protein, etc, doesn’t mean the body will get into ketosis. Generally speaking being keto means that someone has limited their carbohydrate intake to extremely low levels until their body runs out of stored glycogen causing the body to start making ketones (fats) to run on. THAT is what the main goal of a ketogenic diet is- being in ketosis and a state of using fat for fuel. We all have glycogen (carbs) stored in our liver, and when we limit carb consumption our liver kicks out stored glycogen to fuel our activity. When that liver glycogen runs out that is when the body flips the switch and starts making ketones for us to use as energy. Ketones are fractionated fats that yield 7 cals per gram (regular fats yield 9 calories per gram when used for energy). This is very interesting because when we are eating a carb based diet, carbs give us 4 calories per carb eaten to burn for energy. Being in a ketogenic state we are burning 7 calories per ketone….meaning we are burning more energy at rest. I Continue reading >>

Quick Tips For Your First Keto Carb Up

Quick Tips For Your First Keto Carb Up

Switch up your low-carb routine with carb-up pick-me-up. The essentials for your first keto carb-up are hot off the press: when and how often you should do a carb-up, how many and what type of carbs you should get. Okay, you’re loving keto. You’re finally getting the results you’ve always dreamt of and your body is beginning to heal. Yet, things are just getting a little, well, stale. On top of that, you’re not feeling so hot, certainly not as good as you felt when you first embarked on your keto expedition. Welcome to the wonderful world of carb-ups. When you first wade into the ketogenic waters, it’s easy to assume that carbs have the same place in your diet as paint thinner. But they’re not the boogeyman they’re made out to be. The occasional carb-up can actually save your keto butt, especially if you’re a woman. The key is to utilize those carbs strategically. Not sure if carb-ups are for you? Check out this dandy video and blog post. If you’re finding yourself stuck, if your hormones are still a bit out of whack, or if you’re just not feeling up-to-par, this video will deliver the lowdown for your first keto carb-up. For video transcript PDF, scroll down. Your Mini Guide & Transcript A 5-10 page PDF with the transcript for this video, resources, and exclusive steps to taking your fat burning to the next level. Download to your device and access anytime. Simply click the button above, enter your details, and the guide will be delivered to your inbox! Get the mini guide & transcript now. Highlights… Why carb-ups? Carb-up timing & frequency What type of carbs to eat The amount of carbs to get Resources…. Watch: 10 Delicious Carb-Up Meals Pick up my Fat Fueled program to liberate your keto life from restriction. Subscribe to my YouTube channel! Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet?

How Many Carbs Per Day On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet?

Although my initial plan was to include this post in All You Need to Know About Carbs on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet, I decided it deserves to be discussed separately. How Many Carbs per Day to Stay in Ketosis? As described in my post How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work? Weight Loss and 3 Main Effects of Ketosis, weight loss on a ketogenic diet is achieved by limiting the daily intake of net carbs and getting your body in a metabolic state known as ketosis. While in ketosis, your body effectively uses fat for fuel. In general, the daily intake of net carbs required to enter ketosis could vary from 20 to 100 grams per day (and very rarely over 100 grams per day). Most people, who have experienced ketosis, claim to have reached that state at about 20-50 grams of net carbs per day. I'd suggest you start at 20-30 grams and see how you can adjust it for your needs. There are two ways to find your ideal net carbs intake: Low to high method Start from a low level of net carbs to ensure you quickly enter ketosis (~ 20 grams of net carbs per day). When you detect ketosis after about 2-3 days, start adding net carbs (about 5 grams each week) until you detect a very low-level or no ketones (using Ketostix or blood ketone meter). This is usually the most reliable and quickest way to discover your net carbs limit. It could be a bit hard the first couple of days, as you have to give up almost all carbs from one day to another but it will be worth it. This method is highly recommended. High to low method Assuming you're not in ketosis, start from a relatively high level of net carbs (~ 50 grams) and keep reducing (about 5 grams each week) until you detect presence of ketones. This is a less difficult approach but not recommended, as you may spend a long time out of ketosis before you find yo Continue reading >>

Vegan Keto Diet Plan – Lose Weight While Saving The Planet

Vegan Keto Diet Plan – Lose Weight While Saving The Planet

The ketogenic diet can be a wonderful thing…. It helps people all over the world lose weight, control diabetes, reduce seizures and more. But here’s the thing… The keto diet is typically full of animal products such as meat and eggs! Understandably this leaves many vegan’s asking the question “How can a vegan adopt a ketogenic diet when it’s usually full of meat and butter?” Well we’re here to tell you it doesn’t matter if you’re vegan or vegetarian, you can ABSOLUTELY achieve ketosis and reap the benefits that come with it. And to prove it we’ve developed a comprehensive 7 day vegan keto diet plan which we’re going to provide you today absolutely free. But first we need to tell you something… It’s Important to Do it Right We personally utilize this diet here at Vegan at Heart but the reality is… Both the Vegan and Ketogenic diets restrict certain foods from being eaten and combining them has the potential to result in nutritional deficiency – if not done correctly. This depends on the individuals age, nutrient requirements, health status, knowledge and lifestyle. While we believe that the vegan ketogenic diet can be adopted in a healthy way and provide many benefits, if you are doing this for medical reasons or have any doubts we recommend you consult a medical professional before embarking on this journey. Now that’s out of the way, before we get into the diet plan let’s clarify the rules we must follow to enter ketosis as a vegan. How to Follow a Vegan Ketogenic Diet The main steps involved with a vegan ketogenic diet are: Avoid all animal products such as meat, fish, poultry and dairy Restrict net carbs to 30g – 50g net carbs per day (based on caloric requirements) Consume at least 0.4g – 0.6g of plant based protein per pound Continue reading >>

Carbing Up On The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet

Carbing Up On The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet

Please send us your feedback on this article. Introduction Although ketogenic diets are useful for fat loss, while simultaneously sparing muscle loss, they have one significant drawback: they cannot sustain high intensity exercise. Activities like weight training can only use carbohydrates as an energy source, ketones and free fatty acids (FFA) cannot be used. Therefore the lack of carbohydrates on a ketogenic diet will eventually lead to decreased performance in the weight room, which may result in muscle loss, and carbohydrates must be introduced into a ketogenic diet without affecting ketosis. Probably the most common way to do this is to do a weekend carb-load phase, where ketosis is abolished. During this time period, assuming training volume was sufficient to deplete muscle glycogen (see last article), the body can rapidly increase muscle glycogen levels to normal or supra-normal levels prior to beginning the next ketogenic cycle. Anyone who has read both "The Anabolic Diet" (AD) by Dr. Mauro DiPasquale and "Bodyopus" (BO) by Dan Duchaine should realize that there are two diametrically different approaches to the carb-up. In the AD, the carb-up is quite unstructured. The goal is basically to eat a lot of carbs, and stop eating when you feel yourself starting to get bloated (which is roughly indicative of full muscle glycogen stores, where more carbohydrate will spill over to fat). In BO, an extremely meticulous carb-up schedule was provided, breaking down the 48 hour carb-up into individual meals, eaten every 2.5 hours. The approach which this article will provide is somewhere in the middle. This article will discuss a variety of topics which pertain to the carb-load phase of the CKD, including duration, carbohydrate intake, quality of carbohydrate intake, fat gai Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

How To Lose Weight On A Keto Diet In 5 Easy Steps (+ 4 Real-life Examples)

CLEARLY the “eat less”, “eat low fat”, and “just eat everything in moderation” diets haven’t worked too well for most people. So, if you’re still trying to lose weight and keep it off, then maybe it’s time to try something that’s working for tens of thousands of people right now… The Ketogenic Diet. But is it all too good to be true? Yes, we believe Keto is fantastic for weight loss. We’ve just seen it work for way too many people (check out the success stories below). But it’s also not for everyone. So, in this post, we are giving you the real facts behind all the hype as well as real-life stories of people who have lost a lot of weight on Keto. PLUS, how to get started on Keto to lose weight in 5 EASY Steps. What is the Ketogenic Diet? THE HISTORY: Originally the Ketogenic diet was created as an effective treatment for epileptic children. BUT NOW: More and more people are finding that a Ketogenic diet has tons of benefits, including: a healthy way to lose weight, control blood sugar levels, improve your brain function, and potentially even reverse a myriad of health conditions. How does keto do this? The Keto diet puts your body into a powerful fat-burning metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. NUTRITIONAL KETOSIS: In nutritional ketosis, your body generally uses very few carbohydrates for energy. Instead, it switches to using ketones (which are produced from the breakdown of fats). That’s why the keto diet is often called a fat-burning diet… You can literally be burning your own body fat for energy! (It’s still unclear whether ketosis is the magical factor that makes a Keto diet so effective for weight-loss, but whatever it is, it seems to work!) So, how do we get into this nutritional ketosis state? You can get into nutritional k Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet 7-day Meal Plan

Ketogenic Diet 7-day Meal Plan

A lot of people have been asking me what a good keto diet menu would look like. I'm happy to share this 7-Day Ketosis menu with you. If you'd like to find more Keto Recipes to custom your own, take a look at my Ketogenic Diet recipes database. Also for more information about what are the best foods to eat on a Ketogenic Diet Plan, have a look at my Ketogenic Diet Food List. Fore more information about what you need to know before you start this diet plan and how to avoid side effects, take a look at my Ketogenic Diet Guide (you'll get detailed information about what is Ketosis and what it does to your body). Keto Meal Plan Guidelines Keep in mind that everybody has different needs, you'll also have to adjust your plan as you lose weight since your needs will change. Step 1 : Define how many calories you need daily To find out how many calories you need daily use this tool : Daily Calorie Intake Calculator. This will give you the amount of calories you need to maintain your weight, lose 1-2 pounds per week or gain 1-2 pounds per week. Female in good shape : For me (female), to use the Daily Calorie Intake Calculator, I would enter 120 pounds, then since I'm 5'6" I would enter 66 inches (5 feet x 12 inches / feet + 6 inches = 60 + 6 = 66), then I would enter 29 years old female and exercise 3-5x per week. This gives me 2085 Calories a day. Male in good shape : For my boyfriend, to use the Daily Calorie Intake Calculator, I would enter 175 pounds, then since he's 5'9" I would enter 69 inches (5 feet x 12 inches / feet + 6 inches = 60 + 9 = 69), then I would enter 36 years old male and exercise 6-7x per week. This would give him 4425 Calories a day. Step 2 : Define how much calories you need to lose weight You can skip this step my just using the Daily Calorie Intake Calcul Continue reading >>

The Beginner’s Guide To Carb Refeeds

The Beginner’s Guide To Carb Refeeds

A “carb refeed” is strategically increasing your carbohydrate intake on specific days or meals. Here’s how carb refeeds can help boost your metabolism! The basic idea is this: your body adapts to your eating pattern over time. Because many (but not all) Paleo diets tend to be lower in carbs, your body gets used to this. If you’ve tried a low to moderate carb Paleo diet—focusing on vegetables, animal products, and healthy fats—you’ve probably seen just how effective it can be in boosting your energy and melting off body fat. Trying to figure out exactly what to eat on Paleo? Look no further than our FREE 21 Day Paleo Meal Plan It’s not uncommon to see dramatic weight loss over the first few weeks or months. But as you lean out and approach your target weight, weight loss can slow to a crawl or even stop completely. Why? Because restricting your calories (which often happens naturally when you’re following a low carb Paleo diet) decreases your leptin levels. Leptin is known as the “starvation” or “satiety” hormone, and it’s responsible for regulating your appetite and energy expenditure. (Related: How to Carb-Cycle for Fat Loss) When your leptin is low for a long time, your brain gets bombarded with hunger signals (1). You start craving calorically-dense but unhealthy foods like sugars and processed foods. It’s harder to stick to Paleo-friendly foods. And your energy levels might suffer. A carb refeed breaks the cycle. The sudden increase in carbs results in a boost in leptin (2). These occasional leptin surges keep your metabolism from adapting too much to a continuous low carbohydrate intake. By shocking your system like this, carb refeeds can benefit you physically and psychologically. You end up with more energy, weight loss, and fewer cr Continue reading >>

Carb Cycling Diet Plan Benefits & Tips To Maintain Healthy Weight

Carb Cycling Diet Plan Benefits & Tips To Maintain Healthy Weight

The carb cycling diet has been popular among bodybuilders, fitness models and certain types of athletes for decades. Carb cycling — eating more carbs only on certain days — is believed to be beneficial as one of the best diet plans to lose weight and gain muscle because it stimulates certain digestive and metabolic functions. What makes carbs so special? Carbohydrates are the body’s first source of fuel, since they’re easily turned into glucose and glycogen, which feed your cells and help create ATP (energy). Your metabolism rises and falls based on your consumption of calories and different macronutrients, including carbohydrates. (1) And many studies have found that adequate carb intake improves performance in both prolonged, low-intensity and short, high-intensity exercises. (2) Perhaps you’ve heard that your metabolism is a lot like a fire: If you fuel “the fire” with the right ingredients, it keeps burning hotter. As Chris Powell, one of the leading authorities on carb cycling, puts it, “If you don’t throw enough fuel on the fire, the flame fizzles out.” Eating enough carbohydrates at the right time resets your metabolic thermostat and signals your body to create enough beneficial hormones (like leptin and thyroid hormones) that keep you at a healthy weight. However, as we all know, too many carbs can have the opposite effect and cause weight gain. What’s key about a carb cycling diet that makes it different from other plans? Carb cycling increases carbohydrate (and sometimes calorie) intake only at the right time and in the right amounts. While other long-term diet plans might seem overly restrictive, daunting and overwhelming, many find that a carb cycling diet is easy to follow and even fits into a hectic schedule. What Is Carb Cycling? Car Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Of all the places to seek life-changing nutrition advice, I never thought the barber shop would be where I found it. But one day last January, after a couple years of saying to myself, "today's the day I make a change," my barber schooled me on something called keto. Normally, I take things he says with a grain of salt unless they're about hair or owning a business, but this guy could literally be on the cover of Men's Health. He's 6 feet tall, conventionally attractive, and his arms are about five pull-ups away from tearing through his t-shirt. If anyone else had implied that I was looking rough, I would've walked out in a fit of rage, but I decided to hear him out. I should clarify that I was out of shape, but my case wasn't that severe. I hadn't exercised in a few years and basically ate whatever I wanted and however much of it, but I was only about 30 to 40 pounds overweight. My barber went on to explain that this diet, paired with an appropriate exercise routine, allowed him to completely transform his body in less than a year, and all he ate was fatty foods. Once he showed me his "before" picture, I was sold. It was time to actually make a change. Short for ketogenic, keto is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet that forces your metabolism into what's called a state of ketosis. There's a much more scientific explanation to that, but it basically means that instead of burning carbohydrates (mainly glucose, or sugars), your body switches to burning fat as a primary source for energy. Keto isn't necessarily about counting calories, though the basic idea of eating less in order to lose weight still applies. This is more of a calculated way to rewire your metabolism so that it burns fat more efficiently over time, using very specific levels of each macronutrient Continue reading >>

How To Combine The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet And Intermittent Fasting

How To Combine The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet And Intermittent Fasting

keto and fasting are a match made in heaven, but what about the cyclical ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting? Do they work well? If so, then how to do it. Let’s cover some basics. The cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD) is a ketogenic diet in which you cycle between low carb and high carb periods. You eat keto for a given period and then have refeeds with a lot of carbohydrates. Here’s an example schedule. Initial keto-adaptation for 10-21 days Carb refeed for 1-2 days Back on low carb keto for 5-7 days Carb day Rinse and repeat Intermittent fasting (IF) on the other hand is a way of timing your food intake. Your daily caloric consumption can be divided into two periods. Feeding window, during which you’re in a fed state and can eat. Fasting window, during which no calories are consumed and you’re in a fasted state. There are several types of intermittent fasting that differ in terms of time constrictions and what’s eaten during the feeding window. Common IF schedules are: 16-hours fasted and 8-hours eating (16/8) The Warrior Diet (20/4) One Meal a Day (OMAD) Alternate Day Fasting, in which you fast every other day, ending up with 5 days of eating and 2 days of fasting a week (5:2) Intermittent fasting can be done on any diet protocol and is especially effective on the cyclical ketogenic diet. In my opinion, doing intermittent fasting in some shape or form is a lot more important for overall health and longevity. However, combining it with the ketogenic diet has greater benefits. Keto puts you into a state of ketosis, in which you’re burning fat as your main fuel source, instead of glucose. Before that can happen, your liver glycogen stores need to be depleted, which takes about 16-24 hours. We can use this information to our advantage when doing the cyclical Continue reading >>

Carb Ups On Keto Diet (cyclical Ketosis)

Carb Ups On Keto Diet (cyclical Ketosis)

If you have already mastered the standard ketogenic diet, have a solid workout routine and would like to mix things up a little, you might want to consider starting to do carb ups, or a cyclical ketogenic diet. A carb up (also called “carb loading” or “carb refeeding”) is a period of time, usually 1 day (but it could be as short as 1 meal or as long as 2 days) where you’re intentionally consuming more carbs than usual. Yes, this will kick you out of ketosis and this is the purpose – find out why below. Warning: carb up practice is NOT for everyone. You need to understand your body and your goal first. If you’re a beginner, this is absolutely NOT recommended. Why do carb ups on a Keto Diet? Carb ups can serve a few purposes: break a weight loss stall, improving hormonal balance, enhancing muscle growth, increases energy expenditure and leptin concentration (1). To get the full benefits of a carb refeed, you need to do it in a controlled manner, in order to make sure that you get back to keto right after that, and that your carb up weekend does not turn into a carb up week or month. Things to consider before doing a carb up You should consider doing carb ups on a keto diet only once your body has adapted to burning fat as its primary fuel source, which for most people comes after at least 4-6 weeks into their new ketogenic way of eating. Related: 5 Signs You Are Fat Adapted If you start doing carb ups earlier, you risk getting keto flu all over again, and your body will need to restart the fat adaptation process, which can be a generally unpleasant (and unnecessary) experience. Carb ups might awaken your carb cravings, so you need to be extra careful if you’re prone to having strong cravings in the first place. In order to keep those at bay in the days aft Continue reading >>

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