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Keto Caffeine Sensitivity

Common Ketogenic Diet And Low Carb Diet Mistakes

Common Ketogenic Diet And Low Carb Diet Mistakes

Keto//OS Q & A As the Ketogenic diet and lifestyle becomes increasingly mainstream people in the nutrition and health field are starting to see the dark side of what in some cases can be the perfect fit for some. The appeal of a lifestyle where you can seemingly eat cheese and bacon to your heart’s content is hard to resist for a lot of people. And once they’ve heard of a few people who’ve had success with it they are SOLD. The trouble is that for many people it is not that simple. They may not tolerate high amounts of fat, the diet may work for a while and then stop, while some peoples’ blood work normalizes and improves others see their blood work get dramatically worse. What gives? As in all things it’s never really that simple. What “diet” will work best for you is an intricate formula of your genetic makeup, your ancestry, your age and stage, your current health status, food sensitivities and activity levels. In the next few weeks I will explore some of the common mistakes I see people make that can hold them back. Food Sensitivities: This feeds a bit into the next point but I cannot stress enough the importance of listening to your body. Yes, I know that virtually every Keto Cook Book out there is filled with delicious recipes oozing with cheese, and fluffed with full fat whipped cream but even the “best” food may not work for your body. Eggs, pork, dairy, certain nuts, almost any food may cause inflammation and an immune reaction in your body - and you may or may not be aware of it. If you have been Keto or very low carb for a while and don’t seem to be feeling any better or seeing changes in your body composition it may be that you are eating foods that do not agree with you. Get to a Holistic Nutritionist (like me) or a Naturopath and get te Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

The Effects Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet On The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study

The Effects Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet On The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study

Go to: Methods Subjects were recruited from the Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill areas in North Carolina through a community PCOS support group and by word of mouth. After meeting initial eligibility criteria by phone, including replying "yes" to the question, "Have you been told by your health care provider that you have PCOS?," subjects were asked to attend a screening visit for a medical history and physical exam. Informed consent approved by the local Institutional Review Board was obtained. Baseline blood tests were also performed at the screening visit. There were no monetary incentives for participation. Inclusion/exclusion criteria The inclusion criteria were age 18–45 years, diagnosis suggestive of PCOS based on history of chronic anovulation and/or hyperandrogenemia, no other serious medical condition requiring medical supervision, body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2, willingness to use acceptable contraception, and a desire to lose weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, nursing or positive pregnancy test during screening period, and rapid progression of hyperandrogenic signs and symptoms. Intervention Subjects received an intensive group education program during monthly group meetings held every other week throughout the 6-month study period. During the first group meeting, subjects were instructed on both the rationale and implementation of the dietary intervention via use of a LCKD diet book and handouts containing suggestions on choice of appropriate foods.[18] Subjects were then instructed to begin the diet the following day. During follow-up group meetings, study outcome measures were obtained, and continued dietary counseling, adjustment of individual medications, supportive counseling, sharing of food choices, and review of urin Continue reading >>

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

The Truth About Exogenous Ketones Ketones are all the rage among low carbers. And like most things in nutrition and performance, we've found a way to get them in supplement form so we don't have to do any actual work. What are ketones? They're a byproduct of ketosis caused by the process of converting fat to fuel. Your body makes them when it's in a calorie or carb restricted state. What do they do? The body and brain can use them as fuel without the presence of glucose in the blood. And now, you can take ketone supplements (salts and esters), known as exogenous ketones, without actually restricting anything. According to those promoting this nasty-tasting supplement, that means you can have a brain and body fuelled by ketones, along with all of the supposed health benefits that come with running on fat. Well, don't fall for it. Exogenous Ketones = Endogenous Fat Storage? The problem with ketone supplementation (EXOgenous) is that it's not even close to the same thing as being in ketosis (ENDOgenous ketone production). And just like the butter-blended-into-coffee trend, it's a farce. Ketones may be depressing dieters' hunger and giving them a hit of energy and cognitive enhancement, but it's INHIBITING their ability to burn fat, providing zero nourishment, and doing nothing for their metabolic health. There's an assortment of evidence suggesting that it's probably making things worse. Think of exogenous ketones kind of like alcohol. When they're consumed, everything is stored and nothing else is burned. So any lipolysis (fat burning) that would be taking place is halted; any glucose and fatty acids in your blood that were circulating are stored; and the ingested ketones are burned until there aren't any left. More importantly, this clearance of alternative fuels (glucos Continue reading >>

The Morning Cocktail I Drink Instead Of Coffee

The Morning Cocktail I Drink Instead Of Coffee

Try this morning tea cocktail instead of coffee. It’s rocket fuel for the brain. I started experimenting with fat-plus-stimulant beverages in 1998 and 1999 while on the Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD). For the above tea blend, I now add turmeric and ginger to the aged pu-erh, usually Rishi brand. The above video was shot while filming the parkour episode of The Tim Ferriss Experiment TV show. We filmed 13 episodes back-to-back and I needed a morning pick-me-up that could be prepared quickly but sustain me for hours. The tea prep might seem reminiscent of Bulletproof Coffee, and it is. They serve similar purposes. For this reason, I jokingly referred to the cocktail as “Titanium Tea” with the production crew. Alas, BP coffee looks like a delicious frappuccino, and my concoction looks like diabetic horse urine. Here’s why I still drink TT Horse Urine nearly every day: I’m a caffeine “fast metabolizer” according to genetic test results from 23andMe, Navigenics (since acquired), and personal experience. If I drink a cup of black coffee, I feel like a superhero for 30 minutes, then need two cups to get back to baseline. But… When I use a blend of — say — green tea and fermented black tea, I’m combining slightly different pharmacokinetics and biological half-lives, so respective peak plasma (blood) concentrations of stimulants and other compounds are staggered. Instead of one single high point and then a rapid descent into fatigue, I have multiple high points. Rather than feeling amazing for 30 minutes and then fatigued, I can feel 20% more effective for 3-4 hours. This can be extended further if I include a tea like yerba mate (I like Cruz de Malta), which includes three xanthine alkaloids. For our purposes, you can think of these three xanthines as “st Continue reading >>

Caffeine . . . Weight Loss Wonder Boy Or Sneaky Scoundrel?

Caffeine . . . Weight Loss Wonder Boy Or Sneaky Scoundrel?

I’ve been looking for the answer for quite some time. . . what role does caffeine play in your and my weight management journey? The answer gave me a headache. . . literally and figuratively. As many of you, including my office staff, know, I love my Diet Dr. Pepper (and my bacon). I found that being able to sip on a little soda throughout the day significantly helped the carbohydrate cravings and munchies during a busy and stressful day at the office. Diet Dr. Pepper contains caffeine, however, I wasn’t really worried. Caffeine has been well know to have a thermogenic effect which increases your metabolism and has been thought for many years to help with weight loss among the weight loss community. Diet Dr. Pepper is, also, one of only four diet sodas on the grocery store shelves that doesn’t contain acesulfame potassium (click here to see why most artificial sweeteners cause weight gain). The four diet sodas that I have been comfortable with my patients using are Diet Dr. Pepper, Diet Coke, Diet Mug Root-beer and Diet A&W Cream Soda. These are the last four hold out diet sodas that still use NutraSweet (aspartame) as the sweetener. Most of the soda companies have switched the sweetener in their diet sodas to the insulinogenic acesulfame potassium because it tastes more natural and aspartame has been given a media black eye of late. However, NutraSweet (aspartame) is the only sweetener that doesn’t spike your insulin or raise blood sugar (click here to find out why that is important). Yes, I know. The ingestion of 600 times the approved amount of aspartame causes blindness in lab rats (but we’re not lab rats, and . . . have you ever met someone that drinks 600 Diet Dr. Peppers in a day? The lethal dose of bananas, which are high in potassium that will stop yo Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner's Guide

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner's Guide

The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet that offers many health benefits. Over 20 studies show that this type of diet can help you lose weight and improve health (1). Ketogenic diets may even have benefits against diabetes, cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (2, 3, 4, 5). This article is a detailed beginner's guide to the ketogenic diet. It contains everything you need to know. The ketogenic diet (often termed keto) is a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares many similarities with the Atkins and low-carb diets. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain (6, 7). Ketogenic diets can cause massive reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. This, along with the increased ketones, has numerous health benefits (6, 8, 9, 10, 11). The ketogenic diet (keto) is a low-carb, high-fat diet. It lowers blood sugar and insulin levels, and shifts the body’s metabolism away from carbs and towards fat and ketones. There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including: Standard ketogenic diet (SKD): This is a very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and only 5% carbs (1). Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD): This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days. Targeted ketogenic diet (TKD): This diet allows you to add carbs around workouts. High-protein ketogenic diet: This is similar to a standard ketogenic diet, but includes more protein. The ratio is often 60% fat, 35% protein and 5% Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

In an ideal world, there would be clear-cut criteria laid out in black and white about how to do a low-carb diet. While there are certain basics that apply to virtually every low-carb plan, there are also what I would describe as “gray areas” where it will really depend on the individual to figure out for themselves. One such issue is caffeine. If you have read Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution, then you know the late great Dr. Robert C. Atkins addresses this subject a couple of times–but only in passing. Here are the two brief references I found in my mass paperback version of the book: Page 189–“Excessive caffeine has been shown to cause a hypoglycemic reaction, which will provoke cravings and cause you to overeat. Omitting caffeine may be a big sacrifice for you, but, in my experience, weight loss often starts up again as soon as people remove caffeine from their regimen.” Page 222–“Consume caffeine only in moderation.” Other than those two points, Dr. Atkins didn’t say much else about caffeine consumption. Obviously he felt there was enough of a negative metabolic response to caffeine intake for him to dissuade Atkins dieters to try to steer clear of it as much as possible. But what about the impact of caffeine on ketosis? Is there any and what guidelines can people following a low-carb diet use to gauge what amount of caffeine intake they can tolerate while still losing weight? These are some of the questions that were explored by one of my intelligent readers in the following e-mail: Hi Jimmy, I would like to clear something up with your help. I feel there needs to be a summary, possibly a FAQ, on caffeine. Here’s my question: What are the effects of caffeine, ESPECIALLY when one is in ketosis? When talking about caffeine, there are several h Continue reading >>

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Via Spanish Caravan, a frequent commenter with let’s just say a “medical background.” ~~~ Physiological Insulin Resistatnce (PIR) results from glucose deficiency the same way mucin deficiency induces dry eyes, nostrils, colon and anemia like symptoms. They’re both ways of preserving glucose for your brain. When you VLC, your muscles become insulin resistant to preserve your glucose for the brain. So while your muscles are running on fatty acids, they become insulin resistant. This leaves glucose for your brain but the net result is your BG going up as you’re “physiologically” insulin resistant. There doesn’t really seem to a problem with this state, as there is with mucin deficiency; it’s not known to induce diabetes or make prediabetics diabetic. At least not according to those who advocate VLCing. I have a feeling however, that this is a disease-prone state. The effects of low carbohydrate diets on insulin sensitivity depend on what is used to replace the dietary carbohydrate, and the nature of the subjects studied. Dietary carbohydrates may affect insulin action, at least in part, via alterations in plasma free fatty acids. In normal subjects a high-carbohydrate/low-GI breakfast meal reduced free fatty acids by reducing the undershoot of plasma glucose, whereas low-carbohydrate breakfasts increased postprandial free fatty acids. Why is it disease-prone? Because high serum free fatty acids are implicated in various disease states, especially immune related (and also diabetes in some cases). High serum FFA and very low trigs that we see among those who VLC are associated with nascent autoimmunity, especially rheumatic autoimmunity. See: Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders. We’re talking about triglycer Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Coffee

Living Longer With Coffee

Drinking coffee on a low carb diet has never been so controversial. There’s a long list of science-backed health benefits of coffee. But is fighting disease and living longer worth the risks of caffeine? Best coffee for low carb diets Caffeine reactions on low carb Benefits, health studies and research When to kick the coffee habit Is Coffee OK for Keto? Some low carbers have no problems with coffee, while others release unhealthy levels of cortisol – a stress hormone. These low carbers become over-stimulated and easily dependent on the caffeine in coffee. Everyone reacts differently to coffee and caffeine. If your low carb diet is stable with minimal cravings for sugar, drinking a few cups of coffee per day is safe – and enough to gain some major health benefits. One cup of coffee adds only a carb or two to your daily total, and is a fast way to add healthy fats to your low carb diet. Best Coffee for Ketosis Espresso and black coffee are almost zero carb, perfect for your low carb diet. Use heavy cream or half-and-half, and sugar substitutes. Feeling adventurous? Drink a healthy fat-burning coffee made with butter. Reasons to Add Coffee It is well-known that small amounts of caffeine are good for attention, clarity and brain function. But coffee also improves our health, extending our lifespan. Some studies show both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee have the same positive health effects. These studies suggest something other than caffeine in the coffee is responsible for the results. Health Benefits of Coffee Coffee stimulates peristalsis, helping relieve constipation. Coffee has beneficial antioxidants. Drinking coffee lowers the risk of depression among women. Coffee with heavy cream is an acceptable low carb treat and an excellent substitute when you’re Continue reading >>

The Science Behind Fat Metabolism

The Science Behind Fat Metabolism

Per the usual disclaimer, always consult with your doctor before experimenting with your diet (seriously, go see a doctor, get data from blood tests, etc.). Please feel free to comment below if you’re aware of anything that should be updated; I’d appreciate knowing and I’ll update the content quickly. My goal here is to help a scientifically curious audience know the basic story and where to dive in for further study. If I’m successful, the pros will say “duh”, and everyone else will be better informed about how this all works. [UPDATE: based on a ton a helpful feedback and questions on the content below, I’ve written up a separate article summarizing the science behind ketogenic (low-carb) diets. Check it out. Also, the below content has been updated and is still very much applicable to fat metabolism on various kinds of diets. Thanks, everyone!] tl;dr The concentration of glucose in your blood is the critical upstream switch that places your body into a “fat-storing” or “fat-burning” state. The metabolic efficiency of either state — and the time it takes to get into one from the other — depends on a large variety of factors such as food and drink volume and composition, vitamin and mineral balances, stress, hydration, liver and pancreas function, insulin sensitivity, exercise, mental health, and sleep. Carbohydrates you eat, with the exception of indigestible forms like most fibers, eventually become glucose in your blood. Assuming your metabolism is functioning normally, if the switch is on you will store fat. If the switch is off, you will burn fat. Therefore, all things being equal, “diets” are just ways of hacking your body into a sufficiently low-glycemic state to trigger the release of a variety of hormones that, in turn, result in Continue reading >>

Can Caffeine Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Can Caffeine Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Low-carb dieters who consume very few carbohydrates often go into ketosis. Ketosis develops when you use up your glycogen stores and need an alternate source of energy. Your body forms ketone bodies as it breaks down fat to use for energy, and you excrete ketones in the urine. Low-carb dieter use ketone test strips to ensure that they're following the diet correctly and burning fat. Caffeine might disrupt glucose metabolism, which could affect ketosis, although only anecdotal evidence of this exists. Video of the Day Insulin resistance, the inability of cells to respond to and absorb glucose, can raise glucose levels and cause weight gain. Ketosis decreases insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity, meaning the ability of cells to absorb glucose. Insulin helps cells take glucose from the bloodstream to use for energy. Improving insulin sensitivity helps you lose weight. Caffeine might increase insulin resistance. Caffeine and Insulin Resistance Caffeine might increase insulin resistance, which might make losing weight more difficult and also increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, although this has not been clinically proven. A study conducted by researchers from Duke University Medical Center in the August 2004 issue of "Diabetes Care," published by the American Diabetes Association, discussed the effects of caffeine on blood glucose levels and insulin sensitivity. This study showed that 250 mg of caffeine did not change fasting glucose levels but did raise glucose levels after consumption of 75 g of glucose compared with placebo. Although caffeine might raise glucose levels after eating a meal high in carbohydrates, it's unclear that this effect occurs after a low-carbohydrate meal such as those eaten by low-carb dieters. It's also unclear wheth Continue reading >>

Adrenal Fatigue Diet And Low Carb Diet

Adrenal Fatigue Diet And Low Carb Diet

The Role of Sugar Intolerance and Addiction in Chronic Illness I have been working with chronic fatigue for almost thirty years and I use hair tissue mineral analysis with all of my patients. Along with the indicators of adrenal fatigue which are always present in these cases, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance are nearly always revealed in the test results. Over and over again, I hear people saying they had no idea that this was happening. Though not always, the most severe cases can't help but know how badly sugar affects them. But sometimes even then, they have remained very confused about why they have certain symptoms and problems. This is partly due to the aggressive promotion of low fat, high carb diets and the equally aggressive attacks against low carbohydrate diets that have been ongoing for over forty years. Once I have explained the test results and the need to eliminate all sugars from their diet, I often get calls and emails expressing amazement at how quickly they felt better and at what a big effect sugar and other high impact carbohydrates was having on them. This is even before they have begun using the Nutritional Balancing protocols based on the test results. For many people, certainly in my case, knowing this many years before could have changed the course of years of illness and suffering. But no health practitioner was going to tell us we needed a higher fat and lower carbohydrate diet. An adrenal fatigue diet requires a low sugar or low carb diet. Maintaining blood sugar balance is a function of the adrenal glands. The more work you give the adrenals by over eating sugars and starches, the more stress you will put on your adrenal glands every single day no matter what else you do. Complex Carbohydrates I wish I had understood just how imp Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About The Keto Diet

Everything You Need To Know About The Keto Diet

A ketogenic diet is a low carb, high fat diet. One of its main goals is to train your body to get its energy from a whole different source – ketones, rather than glucose. When you eat carbs, your body naturally converts them into glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert into energy and is your body’s immediate go-to for fuel. Insulin is what carries the glucose all through your bloodstream and gets the converted energy to where it needs to go. Because of this process, the fats you eat don’t often get used and end up getting stored away. They are considered as more of a backup for your body and because of the high amount of carbs the majority of people consume, fats rarely get touched. The ketogenic diet (AKA keto diet) breaks this cycle. Through the dramatic drop in carbs, your body starts to go into a state known as ketosis. This is what happens when the amount of healthy fats you eat greatly outnumber the amount of carbohydrates you eat. When you start doing this, your body has no choice but to resort to this ketosis state. The fats you eat will start getting converted into ketones through your liver and those ketones will become your body’s main source of energy. This is a whole different way to get your body into a metabolic state. Rather than starving it of calories, you are starving it of carbs, training your whole system to make ketones as your body’s main source of energy. Different Types Of Ketogenic Diets Standard Ketogenic Diet (SKD) – This is the typical form of the diet. It is very low carb and moderate protein. 75% fats, 20% protein and 5% carbs. Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD) – This is a more advanced form of the diet, typically used by athletes. It involves high carb days. For example, 5 keto days will be Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Sensitivity Quiz

Carbohydrate Sensitivity Quiz

ARE YOU CARBOHYDRATE-SENSITIVE? Take my carbohydrate sensitivity quiz to find out! Do you feel sleepy or foggy 2 hours or less after eating a meal or snack that contains sugars or starches? Yes Do you tend to gain weight around your middle, instead of in your hips and thighs? Yes Do you feel hungry when you shouldn’t need any more food? Yes Do you frequently crave sweets, starches, or dairy products? Yes Do you wake up in the middle of the night and have a hard time getting back to sleep unless you eat something sweet or starchy? Yes Do you get irritable, restless, tense, or anxious in the early evening before dinner? Yes Do you have a hard time controlling how much sugar or starch you eat? Yes Do you have symptoms of “hypoglycemia” if you don’t eat every 2-3 hours? [Typical hypoglycemic symptoms include feeling shaky, panicky, irritable, anxious, or lightheaded when you’re hungry.] Yes Do any of the following diseases run in your immediate family? Do you often binge on sweets, starches, or dairy products? Yes Do you prefer sweets and starches over all other types of food? Yes Do sweets and starches make you feel temporarily less depressed or less anxious? Yes Do you feel you need to carry food with you wherever you go? Yes Do you tend to get panicky or hungry while exercising? Yes Women only: Do you feel much more emotional in the days prior to your period? Yes Your carbohydrate sensitivity score is 0. What does my score mean? The more YES answers you have, the more likely it is that you are sensitive to carbohydrates (insulin resistant), and the more seriously you should consider cutting back on carbohydrates in your diet. How can I be sure my symptoms are due to carbohydrates? These symptoms are just a collection of common clues. For more accurate informati Continue reading >>

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