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Keto Caffeine Sensitivity

How Bulletproof Coffee Helps Low Carb Paleo Dry Eyes

How Bulletproof Coffee Helps Low Carb Paleo Dry Eyes

Just about any coffee can stop dry eyes in two ways: 1. Bad coffee tastes bad and has toxins in it, which makes you sad, which makes you cry. Problem solved! 2. The caffeine in coffee acts on certain chemical receptors in your brain, which facilitates the release of tears. Both of these observations are supported by research. The first theory is supported by the fact that I’ve never had street-grade coffee that didn’t leave me in tears, cursing that I spent $4 on something that tastes that burnt. The second way coffee stops dry eyes is supported by a new study that was just published in the journal Ophthalmology. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca, also known as “dry eye syndrome,” is a disorder that usually happens to older people where there is a malfunction in the production and clearance of tears. It also happens to people on very low carb diets for long periods of time. For most people, it’s a minor inconvenience that requires some eye drops and blinking. For others, it can progress into a serious disease that results in loss of vision. This condition affects over 4 million people over the age of 50 in the U.S. A new study has shown that caffeine may be a solution. Before getting into the study details, here is a little background: A previous study found that 13 percent of caffeine users had dry eye syndrome, while 17% of non-caffeine users had the condition. Previous studies had also shown that caffeine stimulates the production of saliva and gastric fluids (like stomach acid), so it seemed likely that it would also increase tear production. In this new study, Japanese researchers divided 78 participants into two groups: One group received caffeine tablets in the first session, and a placebo in the second session. The other group received the same dosage, but th Continue reading >>

Keto And Caffeine, Impact On Ketosis?

Keto And Caffeine, Impact On Ketosis?

Many questions that I get from friends and family are related to keto and caffeine. Since I am a frequent coffee drinker and usually have 5 to 6 cups of black coffee every day I decided to check it out a little to see if there is any research or indications that caffeine will impact on ketosis. So far in my researching in this topic I have not found any real proof that shows that it has any impact. There is some indication of people who claim they have a slower keto progress when drinking coffee or tea compared to when not. But there is not a big enough sample to draw any real conclusion on this. It might be that caffeine could interrupt the glucose metabolism, which in turn could affect ketosis but there is no real evidence to support this. Then when considering the insulin resistance there is another thing to consider. Ketosis decreases the insulin resistance by improving the insulin sensitivity, which means the ability for the cells to absorb glucose. There is some indications that caffeine might increase the insulin resistance but this has also not been proven in any studies. There was a study made at Duke University Medical Center in August 2004 that looked at the effects of caffeine on the blood glucose levels and insulin resistance. The study result showed that 250mg of caffeine did not change the glucose levels. The interesting part of this study however was that there was actually an increase in the glucose levels if you had 75g of carbohydrates together with the caffeine. As the result from the study shows the glucose levels might increase if having caffeine together with a meal with a high amount of carbohydrates but there is no indication what the impact is for people who eat according to a low carb diet. This has also been mentioned by Lyle McDonald who is Continue reading >>

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

The Truth About Exogenous Ketones Ketones are all the rage among low carbers. And like most things in nutrition and performance, we've found a way to get them in supplement form so we don't have to do any actual work. What are ketones? They're a byproduct of ketosis caused by the process of converting fat to fuel. Your body makes them when it's in a calorie or carb restricted state. What do they do? The body and brain can use them as fuel without the presence of glucose in the blood. And now, you can take ketone supplements (salts and esters), known as exogenous ketones, without actually restricting anything. According to those promoting this nasty-tasting supplement, that means you can have a brain and body fuelled by ketones, along with all of the supposed health benefits that come with running on fat. Well, don't fall for it. Exogenous Ketones = Endogenous Fat Storage? The problem with ketone supplementation (EXOgenous) is that it's not even close to the same thing as being in ketosis (ENDOgenous ketone production). And just like the butter-blended-into-coffee trend, it's a farce. Ketones may be depressing dieters' hunger and giving them a hit of energy and cognitive enhancement, but it's INHIBITING their ability to burn fat, providing zero nourishment, and doing nothing for their metabolic health. There's an assortment of evidence suggesting that it's probably making things worse. Think of exogenous ketones kind of like alcohol. When they're consumed, everything is stored and nothing else is burned. So any lipolysis (fat burning) that would be taking place is halted; any glucose and fatty acids in your blood that were circulating are stored; and the ingested ketones are burned until there aren't any left. More importantly, this clearance of alternative fuels (glucos Continue reading >>

Keto Headache Guide

Keto Headache Guide

Try 5 keto headache remedies proven to work within 30 minutes. Learn why a keto headache happens on a low carb diet and find out how long yours will last. See how to prevent a keto headache from recurring in the future. Keto Headache Cures If you need immediate keto headache relief, here are five different proven remedies you can use to cure it within 30 minutes. This works just as well if you have a keto headache first day in versus a keto headache two weeks in. 1. Drink warm water with half teaspoon of table salt. You might want to try the simplest solution first. Add half a teaspoon of table salt to a 24 ounce glass of warm water (3 cups) and drink it. This should cure your headache within 20-30 minutes if it’s being caused dehydration or sodium deficit. I have tried this drink both cold and warm. When the water is cold it’s damn near intolerable, but when the water is warm, I can get it down. 2. Drink a carton of bone broth. If warm salt water isn’t to your tastes, then try sipping down a carton of bone broth. You can drink chicken or beef bone broth, doesn’t matter. Drink 16 ounces (2 cups) or more to ensure you get enough sodium. The beef bone broth pictured above is a bland, almost tasteless drink that I much prefer with a spoonful of butter added. Butter improves the taste and keeps you inline with your keto macros as it adds a lot of fat. 3. Drink vegetable bouillon dissolved in two cups of water. Boil two cups of water in the microwave, then drop in a bouillon tab and stir it with a spoon to help it dissolve. Drink up. This is a good headache remedy if you’re doing vegan keto. It’s also surprisingly delicious. The vegetable bouillon is definitely the best tasting of the 5 keto headache remedies. I had never even heard of it before I started my rese Continue reading >>

Common Ketogenic Diet And Low Carb Diet Mistakes

Common Ketogenic Diet And Low Carb Diet Mistakes

Keto//OS Q & A As the Ketogenic diet and lifestyle becomes increasingly mainstream people in the nutrition and health field are starting to see the dark side of what in some cases can be the perfect fit for some. The appeal of a lifestyle where you can seemingly eat cheese and bacon to your heart’s content is hard to resist for a lot of people. And once they’ve heard of a few people who’ve had success with it they are SOLD. The trouble is that for many people it is not that simple. They may not tolerate high amounts of fat, the diet may work for a while and then stop, while some peoples’ blood work normalizes and improves others see their blood work get dramatically worse. What gives? As in all things it’s never really that simple. What “diet” will work best for you is an intricate formula of your genetic makeup, your ancestry, your age and stage, your current health status, food sensitivities and activity levels. In the next few weeks I will explore some of the common mistakes I see people make that can hold them back. Food Sensitivities: This feeds a bit into the next point but I cannot stress enough the importance of listening to your body. Yes, I know that virtually every Keto Cook Book out there is filled with delicious recipes oozing with cheese, and fluffed with full fat whipped cream but even the “best” food may not work for your body. Eggs, pork, dairy, certain nuts, almost any food may cause inflammation and an immune reaction in your body - and you may or may not be aware of it. If you have been Keto or very low carb for a while and don’t seem to be feeling any better or seeing changes in your body composition it may be that you are eating foods that do not agree with you. Get to a Holistic Nutritionist (like me) or a Naturopath and get te Continue reading >>

Does Low Carb Increase Sensitivity To Caffeine?

Does Low Carb Increase Sensitivity To Caffeine?

Junior Low-Carber I'm just wondering because I find that on a vlc woe I don't tolerate caffeine very well. A couple of cups of regular coffee makes me feel kinda antsy, almost overly anxious, when eating vlc. On the other hand, when eating the typical American diet, I can drink a full 10cup pot in the morning with no problems. I mix decaf and regular currently and that works well, I was just curious to see if there was a reason for it, and if anyone else finds the same thing. Expert Low-Carber I don't have a problem with the caffeine at all. I've been VLC for nearly 3 years, and I drink 3 cups of very strong coffee (my sister-in-law says it will strip paint off walls) every day. Granted, I put heavy cream in it, which makes it easier on my stomach, but I don't think it changes the effects of caffeine. I also drink 2 or 3 cups of green tea every day. However, if I don't have any caffeine, I don't get a headache and I don't find my alertness affected. I just miss my coffee. Actually, I have had discussions about this with my son, and I think there is something about coffee (but not the caffeine, per se) that makes me feel good. He has recently discovered Starbucks, and he finds that their White Chocolate Mocchiato (sp?) has a calming and relaxing effect on him, which is different from the caffeine hit he gets from Monster. Yes, I am aware there are sugar issues here, but he's an adult and makes his own choices. Expert Low-Carber I don't have that particular problem with caffeine, although I drink more tea than coffee, so maybe I'm not getting such a concentrated dose at any one time (though I get through a fair amount of tea though). There is a school of thought that says that any increase in one's metabolism may increase one's need for nutrients, and some people say that Continue reading >>

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Via Spanish Caravan, a frequent commenter with let’s just say a “medical background.” ~~~ Physiological Insulin Resistatnce (PIR) results from glucose deficiency the same way mucin deficiency induces dry eyes, nostrils, colon and anemia like symptoms. They’re both ways of preserving glucose for your brain. When you VLC, your muscles become insulin resistant to preserve your glucose for the brain. So while your muscles are running on fatty acids, they become insulin resistant. This leaves glucose for your brain but the net result is your BG going up as you’re “physiologically” insulin resistant. There doesn’t really seem to a problem with this state, as there is with mucin deficiency; it’s not known to induce diabetes or make prediabetics diabetic. At least not according to those who advocate VLCing. I have a feeling however, that this is a disease-prone state. The effects of low carbohydrate diets on insulin sensitivity depend on what is used to replace the dietary carbohydrate, and the nature of the subjects studied. Dietary carbohydrates may affect insulin action, at least in part, via alterations in plasma free fatty acids. In normal subjects a high-carbohydrate/low-GI breakfast meal reduced free fatty acids by reducing the undershoot of plasma glucose, whereas low-carbohydrate breakfasts increased postprandial free fatty acids. Why is it disease-prone? Because high serum free fatty acids are implicated in various disease states, especially immune related (and also diabetes in some cases). High serum FFA and very low trigs that we see among those who VLC are associated with nascent autoimmunity, especially rheumatic autoimmunity. See: Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders. We’re talking about triglycer Continue reading >>

The Effects Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet On The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study

The Effects Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet On The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study

Go to: Methods Subjects were recruited from the Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill areas in North Carolina through a community PCOS support group and by word of mouth. After meeting initial eligibility criteria by phone, including replying "yes" to the question, "Have you been told by your health care provider that you have PCOS?," subjects were asked to attend a screening visit for a medical history and physical exam. Informed consent approved by the local Institutional Review Board was obtained. Baseline blood tests were also performed at the screening visit. There were no monetary incentives for participation. Inclusion/exclusion criteria The inclusion criteria were age 18–45 years, diagnosis suggestive of PCOS based on history of chronic anovulation and/or hyperandrogenemia, no other serious medical condition requiring medical supervision, body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2, willingness to use acceptable contraception, and a desire to lose weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, nursing or positive pregnancy test during screening period, and rapid progression of hyperandrogenic signs and symptoms. Intervention Subjects received an intensive group education program during monthly group meetings held every other week throughout the 6-month study period. During the first group meeting, subjects were instructed on both the rationale and implementation of the dietary intervention via use of a LCKD diet book and handouts containing suggestions on choice of appropriate foods.[18] Subjects were then instructed to begin the diet the following day. During follow-up group meetings, study outcome measures were obtained, and continued dietary counseling, adjustment of individual medications, supportive counseling, sharing of food choices, and review of urin Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

In an ideal world, there would be clear-cut criteria laid out in black and white about how to do a low-carb diet. While there are certain basics that apply to virtually every low-carb plan, there are also what I would describe as “gray areas” where it will really depend on the individual to figure out for themselves. One such issue is caffeine. If you have read Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution, then you know the late great Dr. Robert C. Atkins addresses this subject a couple of times–but only in passing. Here are the two brief references I found in my mass paperback version of the book: Page 189–“Excessive caffeine has been shown to cause a hypoglycemic reaction, which will provoke cravings and cause you to overeat. Omitting caffeine may be a big sacrifice for you, but, in my experience, weight loss often starts up again as soon as people remove caffeine from their regimen.” Page 222–“Consume caffeine only in moderation.” Other than those two points, Dr. Atkins didn’t say much else about caffeine consumption. Obviously he felt there was enough of a negative metabolic response to caffeine intake for him to dissuade Atkins dieters to try to steer clear of it as much as possible. But what about the impact of caffeine on ketosis? Is there any and what guidelines can people following a low-carb diet use to gauge what amount of caffeine intake they can tolerate while still losing weight? These are some of the questions that were explored by one of my intelligent readers in the following e-mail: Hi Jimmy, I would like to clear something up with your help. I feel there needs to be a summary, possibly a FAQ, on caffeine. Here’s my question: What are the effects of caffeine, ESPECIALLY when one is in ketosis? When talking about caffeine, there are several h Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Faq: All You Need To Know

Below is an list of the most commonly asked questions about the ketogenic diet. Simply click on the question you're interested in and it will take you right to the answer. If you have any more questions, please let me know by leaving a comment and I'll add it to the list! KetoDiet Basic Facts Foods & Diet Plans Health Concerns Troubleshooting 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week KetoDiet Basic Facts Why is it that conventional diets don't work? Most of us would say we get fat simply because we get lazy and eat more. But what if it's the other way round? What if we just get fat and as a result we eat more and become lazy? For the last decades we have been given wrong advice about nutrition and effects of fatty foods on putting on weight. What if the main problem is that due to our modern diets we cannot satisfy our appetite? A study on this subject concluded with a surprising result: the fatter people get, the more inactive they become, not the other way round. And what if the interests of the authorities offering advice are influenced by economic reasons? To learn more about this, I recommend you watch The Food Revolution on Youtube Ketogenic diets are, in fact, closely related to the Paleolithic diet. Both exclude carbohydrates and aim at eating real food. Today carbohydrates make the majority of our diet and have significant implications for our health including hormone balance. For example, insulin, which is responsible for storing fat in our body, is greatly affected by excessive carbohydrate consumption. Carbohydrates are without doubt the most fattening element in our diets. Based on studies performed over th Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Caffeine On Ketosis

The Effects Of Caffeine On Ketosis

Nowadays, it seems as if society as we know it, is becoming more and more obsessed with body image and appearance on a day to day basis. Because of this, we find ourselves constantly trying to watch what we eat, watching our figures, and busting our butts in the gym until we feel physically sick in the process. What generally tends to happen is that when we go from one extreme, I.E eating junk and being lazy, to another, I.E eating healthy, but incredibly low calorie diets and exercising until we feel sick, it comes as quite a shock to the system to begin with, and we lose a fair amount of fat. Sadly, the body quickly adapts to these changes and our progress becomes slower and slower with each passing day. Eventually, we’ll find ourselves eating boring and tasteless food, constantly feeling tired, hungry, and irritable due to the extreme calorie deficit, and struggling to complete even the most basic of workouts. What generally then happens is that we’ll weigh ourselves, and notice that, after weeks of dieting, exercising, and making ourselves miserable in the process, we’ve lost barely any weight, if any weight at all for that matter. We then likely feel discouraged, will throw the towel in, and stuff our faces full of as much junk food as possible, before repeating the entire vicious circle all over again. Now, don’t get us wrong, calorie restrictive diets rich in healthy foods do work, but extreme deficits, and bland tasting foods are not good for the body, or the psyche for that matter. Ketogenic diets however, are quickly becoming popular once more, and it is ketogenic diets we’ll be looking at here, alongside caffeine and how caffeine effects these diets. What is ketosis? Ketogenic diets, such as ‘keto’ and the Atkins diet, are not new concepts, as t Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Coffee And Insulin, Fat And Post-workout Meals

Dear Mark: Coffee And Insulin, Fat And Post-workout Meals

159 Comments In today’s edition of Dear Mark, I cover two topics near and dear to many of your hearts. First, I discuss the interaction between coffee intake and insulin. Does coffee stimulate its secretion? Does it impair insulin’s function, or our body’s reaction to it? Find out how you should approach coffee on a Primal Blueprint eating plan. Then, I explore the suitability of dietary fat in the post-workout meal. Does it belong? Should you be stocking skim milk, de-fatted chicken breast, non-fat yogurt, and cartons of egg whites for your post-workout meals? If you’ve just lifted something heavy, should you therefore shun the yolks and fear the fat for the rest of the day? Find out below. Let’s go. Does coffee raise insulin levels? A lot of contradictory stuff out there. Hoping you could get to the bottom of it. Also, how does it affect GABA? Thanks Odin What makes coffee research so confusing is that a lot of it is actually caffeine research. You see, researchers love isolating whole food constituents to avoid confounding variables. It’s easier to get a definitive result about caffeine than it is to get one about coffee, because coffee contains huge and diverse levels of antioxidant compounds. If you don’t, and coffee has a health effect, how do you know if it’s the caffeine or something else in coffee causing the effect? That’s helpful, but most of us are drinking coffee – not popping caffeine pills. So, while caffeine is definitely one of the main active compounds in coffee, it’s not the only one. Adjust your interpretation of “coffee” research accordingly. That said, both caffeine and coffee have been shown to exert negative effects on insulin sensitivity. Not on insulin itself, though. As standalone substances (without a meal to accompa Continue reading >>

Adrenal Fatigue Diet And Low Carb Diet

Adrenal Fatigue Diet And Low Carb Diet

The Role of Sugar Intolerance and Addiction in Chronic Illness I have been working with chronic fatigue for almost thirty years and I use hair tissue mineral analysis with all of my patients. Along with the indicators of adrenal fatigue which are always present in these cases, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance are nearly always revealed in the test results. Over and over again, I hear people saying they had no idea that this was happening. Though not always, the most severe cases can't help but know how badly sugar affects them. But sometimes even then, they have remained very confused about why they have certain symptoms and problems. This is partly due to the aggressive promotion of low fat, high carb diets and the equally aggressive attacks against low carbohydrate diets that have been ongoing for over forty years. Once I have explained the test results and the need to eliminate all sugars from their diet, I often get calls and emails expressing amazement at how quickly they felt better and at what a big effect sugar and other high impact carbohydrates was having on them. This is even before they have begun using the Nutritional Balancing protocols based on the test results. For many people, certainly in my case, knowing this many years before could have changed the course of years of illness and suffering. But no health practitioner was going to tell us we needed a higher fat and lower carbohydrate diet. An adrenal fatigue diet requires a low sugar or low carb diet. Maintaining blood sugar balance is a function of the adrenal glands. The more work you give the adrenals by over eating sugars and starches, the more stress you will put on your adrenal glands every single day no matter what else you do. Complex Carbohydrates I wish I had understood just how imp Continue reading >>

Caffeine . . . Weight Loss Wonder Boy Or Sneaky Scoundrel?

Caffeine . . . Weight Loss Wonder Boy Or Sneaky Scoundrel?

I’ve been looking for the answer for quite some time. . . what role does caffeine play in your and my weight management journey? The answer gave me a headache. . . literally and figuratively. As many of you, including my office staff, know, I love my Diet Dr. Pepper (and my bacon). I found that being able to sip on a little soda throughout the day significantly helped the carbohydrate cravings and munchies during a busy and stressful day at the office. Diet Dr. Pepper contains caffeine, however, I wasn’t really worried. Caffeine has been well know to have a thermogenic effect which increases your metabolism and has been thought for many years to help with weight loss among the weight loss community. Diet Dr. Pepper is, also, one of only four diet sodas on the grocery store shelves that doesn’t contain acesulfame potassium (click here to see why most artificial sweeteners cause weight gain). The four diet sodas that I have been comfortable with my patients using are Diet Dr. Pepper, Diet Coke, Diet Mug Root-beer and Diet A&W Cream Soda. These are the last four hold out diet sodas that still use NutraSweet (aspartame) as the sweetener. Most of the soda companies have switched the sweetener in their diet sodas to the insulinogenic acesulfame potassium because it tastes more natural and aspartame has been given a media black eye of late. However, NutraSweet (aspartame) is the only sweetener that doesn’t spike your insulin or raise blood sugar (click here to find out why that is important). Yes, I know. The ingestion of 600 times the approved amount of aspartame causes blindness in lab rats (but we’re not lab rats, and . . . have you ever met someone that drinks 600 Diet Dr. Peppers in a day? The lethal dose of bananas, which are high in potassium that will stop yo Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Coffee On A Low Carb Diet

The Effects Of Coffee On A Low Carb Diet

So you're a regular coffee drinker who's considering a low-carb diet. Better weigh that decision carefully over your next Venti Bold because the diet recommends you limit your java intake. According to the Atkins website, caffeine in coffee may lower your blood sugar or increase food cravings. While it's always a good idea to consume only moderate amounts of coffee no matter what diet you're following, it may be the diet itself and not the coffee that affects blood sugar and cravings. Consult your doctor before making any changes to your diet. Video of the Day While there is an association between coffee and better blood sugar, it's not known to cause hypoglycemia. It's recommended that you limit your intake of caffeinated beverages when you have issues with hypoglycemia, however, because of how it might affect your health in other ways, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. If you feel disoriented, dizzy, irritable, tired or anxious after drinking a cup of coffee on your low-carb diet, consult your doctor immediately. Coffee and Cravings A 2011 study published in the Journal of Nutrition investigated the effects of coffee, both regular and decaffeinated, on appetite in a small group of healthy men. The study found that neither type of coffee had any effect on appetite or intake. This study was small, and the participants were not following a low-carb diet, however. If you're craving certain foods while on the low-carb diet, it may be more that you're missing the taste or how the food makes you feel. While low-carb proponents report ill health effects for some people who drink coffee while following the diet, you are allowed up to 2 cups a day as tolerated. If you drink several cups a day and decide to cut back as suggested, you might want to do so slo Continue reading >>

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