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Keto Caffeine Sensitivity

Caffeine . . . Weight Loss Wonder Boy Or Sneaky Scoundrel?

Caffeine . . . Weight Loss Wonder Boy Or Sneaky Scoundrel?

I’ve been looking for the answer for quite some time. . . what role does caffeine play in your and my weight management journey? The answer gave me a headache. . . literally and figuratively. As many of you, including my office staff, know, I love my Diet Dr. Pepper (and my bacon). I found that being able to sip on a little soda throughout the day significantly helped the carbohydrate cravings and munchies during a busy and stressful day at the office. Diet Dr. Pepper contains caffeine, however, I wasn’t really worried. Caffeine has been well know to have a thermogenic effect which increases your metabolism and has been thought for many years to help with weight loss among the weight loss community. Diet Dr. Pepper is, also, one of only four diet sodas on the grocery store shelves that doesn’t contain acesulfame potassium (click here to see why most artificial sweeteners cause weight gain). The four diet sodas that I have been comfortable with my patients using are Diet Dr. Pepper, Diet Coke, Diet Mug Root-beer and Diet A&W Cream Soda. These are the last four hold out diet sodas that still use NutraSweet (aspartame) as the sweetener. Most of the soda companies have switched the sweetener in their diet sodas to the insulinogenic acesulfame potassium because it tastes more natural and aspartame has been given a media black eye of late. However, NutraSweet (aspartame) is the only sweetener that doesn’t spike your insulin or raise blood sugar (click here to find out why that is important). Yes, I know. The ingestion of 600 times the approved amount of aspartame causes blindness in lab rats (but we’re not lab rats, and . . . have you ever met someone that drinks 600 Diet Dr. Peppers in a day? The lethal dose of bananas, which are high in potassium that will stop yo Continue reading >>

Keto And Caffeine, Impact On Ketosis?

Keto And Caffeine, Impact On Ketosis?

Many questions that I get from friends and family are related to keto and caffeine. Since I am a frequent coffee drinker and usually have 5 to 6 cups of black coffee every day I decided to check it out a little to see if there is any research or indications that caffeine will impact on ketosis. So far in my researching in this topic I have not found any real proof that shows that it has any impact. There is some indication of people who claim they have a slower keto progress when drinking coffee or tea compared to when not. But there is not a big enough sample to draw any real conclusion on this. It might be that caffeine could interrupt the glucose metabolism, which in turn could affect ketosis but there is no real evidence to support this. Then when considering the insulin resistance there is another thing to consider. Ketosis decreases the insulin resistance by improving the insulin sensitivity, which means the ability for the cells to absorb glucose. There is some indications that caffeine might increase the insulin resistance but this has also not been proven in any studies. There was a study made at Duke University Medical Center in August 2004 that looked at the effects of caffeine on the blood glucose levels and insulin resistance. The study result showed that 250mg of caffeine did not change the glucose levels. The interesting part of this study however was that there was actually an increase in the glucose levels if you had 75g of carbohydrates together with the caffeine. As the result from the study shows the glucose levels might increase if having caffeine together with a meal with a high amount of carbohydrates but there is no indication what the impact is for people who eat according to a low carb diet. This has also been mentioned by Lyle McDonald who is Continue reading >>

Does Cheese, Nuts Or Coffee Impact A Ketogenic Diet?

Does Cheese, Nuts Or Coffee Impact A Ketogenic Diet?

There is a lot of conflicting data on whether cheese, nuts or coffee are ideal or acceptable for a ketogenic diet. So let me clear the air a little with some of my experiences and bring in a pinch of clarity and sanity to the issue. SO are cheese, nuts and/or coffee harmful when taken while on keto? What are the impacts? Are there any specifications as to the quantities, if it ideal to take them? Are they diet friendly? Let’s review. Cheese A lot of people will argue that eating cheese on a ketogenic diet is harmful. The assumption that by eating cheese you are prone to taking in additional carbs, which is not 100% true. Yes, cheese does contains carbs so as long as you don’t go over the carb limit, you’ll be good. The thing to be concerned about is most individuals have a sensitivity to dairy products (and don’t know it), due to the casein in them. So if you have dietary sensitivity to it, avoid it (many people who suffer from a keto diet stall should cut out cheese). Cheese can be a great source of fat soluble vitamins. Eaten in moderation therefore, cheese is ok. Nuts Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake. Coffee & Caffeine Biggest grey area in the world of keto. Coffee is engraved in our cultur Continue reading >>

Does Low Carb Increase Sensitivity To Caffeine?

Does Low Carb Increase Sensitivity To Caffeine?

Junior Low-Carber I'm just wondering because I find that on a vlc woe I don't tolerate caffeine very well. A couple of cups of regular coffee makes me feel kinda antsy, almost overly anxious, when eating vlc. On the other hand, when eating the typical American diet, I can drink a full 10cup pot in the morning with no problems. I mix decaf and regular currently and that works well, I was just curious to see if there was a reason for it, and if anyone else finds the same thing. Expert Low-Carber I don't have a problem with the caffeine at all. I've been VLC for nearly 3 years, and I drink 3 cups of very strong coffee (my sister-in-law says it will strip paint off walls) every day. Granted, I put heavy cream in it, which makes it easier on my stomach, but I don't think it changes the effects of caffeine. I also drink 2 or 3 cups of green tea every day. However, if I don't have any caffeine, I don't get a headache and I don't find my alertness affected. I just miss my coffee. Actually, I have had discussions about this with my son, and I think there is something about coffee (but not the caffeine, per se) that makes me feel good. He has recently discovered Starbucks, and he finds that their White Chocolate Mocchiato (sp?) has a calming and relaxing effect on him, which is different from the caffeine hit he gets from Monster. Yes, I am aware there are sugar issues here, but he's an adult and makes his own choices. Expert Low-Carber I don't have that particular problem with caffeine, although I drink more tea than coffee, so maybe I'm not getting such a concentrated dose at any one time (though I get through a fair amount of tea though). There is a school of thought that says that any increase in one's metabolism may increase one's need for nutrients, and some people say that Continue reading >>

The Science Behind Keto Os

The Science Behind Keto Os

Ketones are the high energy substances that your body makes when it breaks down stored fat for energy. Typically, they’re only produced when the body is in a state of fasting. With Keto OS, through an innovative combination of engineered ketone mineral salts, the body gets the same high-energy fuel in a tasty, convenient drink.* In fact, the body gets all the nutrition it needs to help keep it in the best possible shape. Ingredients MCT Powder Beta hydroxybutyrate Natural flavor Malic acid Stevia Caffeine (non-caffeine version is available) Gluten Free Contains milk ingredients Is Keto OS safe? Yes, it has been scientifically proven time and time again by highly-respected medical professionals who are behind the science and success of this one-of-a-kind product. These specialists have used their expertise and experience to test and analyze the product continuously to provide you with the safest, best-performing product around. Benefits of Keto OS Keto OS has the ability to help with virtually any illness or ailment by providing the body with the fuel it needs to repair itself and maintain an optimal state of health without subscribing to a restrictive diet.* For those with low endurance, decreased energy and athletic performance, Keto OS can provide your body with ketones and abundant energy, which can provide the body with the fuel to exercise and perform vigorous physical activity.* For those who are overweight and/or suffer from cravings, have high blood pressure or high cholesterol, the body is placed in fat-burning mode with Keto OS, which increases weight loss and can also alleviate the pain associated with inflammation.* For those who suffer from autism, bipolar, mood disorders, Keto OS increases mental clarity, which can help people think more clearly and can Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Coffee

Living Longer With Coffee

Drinking coffee on a low carb diet has never been so controversial. There’s a long list of science-backed health benefits of coffee. But is fighting disease and living longer worth the risks of caffeine? Best coffee for low carb diets Caffeine reactions on low carb Benefits, health studies and research When to kick the coffee habit Is Coffee OK for Keto? Some low carbers have no problems with coffee, while others release unhealthy levels of cortisol – a stress hormone. These low carbers become over-stimulated and easily dependent on the caffeine in coffee. Everyone reacts differently to coffee and caffeine. If your low carb diet is stable with minimal cravings for sugar, drinking a few cups of coffee per day is safe – and enough to gain some major health benefits. One cup of coffee adds only a carb or two to your daily total, and is a fast way to add healthy fats to your low carb diet. Best Coffee for Ketosis Espresso and black coffee are almost zero carb, perfect for your low carb diet. Use heavy cream or half-and-half, and sugar substitutes. Feeling adventurous? Drink a healthy fat-burning coffee made with butter. Reasons to Add Coffee It is well-known that small amounts of caffeine are good for attention, clarity and brain function. But coffee also improves our health, extending our lifespan. Some studies show both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee have the same positive health effects. These studies suggest something other than caffeine in the coffee is responsible for the results. Health Benefits of Coffee Coffee stimulates peristalsis, helping relieve constipation. Coffee has beneficial antioxidants. Drinking coffee lowers the risk of depression among women. Coffee with heavy cream is an acceptable low carb treat and an excellent substitute when you’re Continue reading >>

The Science Behind Fat Metabolism

The Science Behind Fat Metabolism

Per the usual disclaimer, always consult with your doctor before experimenting with your diet (seriously, go see a doctor, get data from blood tests, etc.). Please feel free to comment below if you’re aware of anything that should be updated; I’d appreciate knowing and I’ll update the content quickly. My goal here is to help a scientifically curious audience know the basic story and where to dive in for further study. If I’m successful, the pros will say “duh”, and everyone else will be better informed about how this all works. [UPDATE: based on a ton a helpful feedback and questions on the content below, I’ve written up a separate article summarizing the science behind ketogenic (low-carb) diets. Check it out. Also, the below content has been updated and is still very much applicable to fat metabolism on various kinds of diets. Thanks, everyone!] tl;dr The concentration of glucose in your blood is the critical upstream switch that places your body into a “fat-storing” or “fat-burning” state. The metabolic efficiency of either state — and the time it takes to get into one from the other — depends on a large variety of factors such as food and drink volume and composition, vitamin and mineral balances, stress, hydration, liver and pancreas function, insulin sensitivity, exercise, mental health, and sleep. Carbohydrates you eat, with the exception of indigestible forms like most fibers, eventually become glucose in your blood. Assuming your metabolism is functioning normally, if the switch is on you will store fat. If the switch is off, you will burn fat. Therefore, all things being equal, “diets” are just ways of hacking your body into a sufficiently low-glycemic state to trigger the release of a variety of hormones that, in turn, result in Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

Does Caffeine Impact Ketosis On A Low-carb Diet?

In an ideal world, there would be clear-cut criteria laid out in black and white about how to do a low-carb diet. While there are certain basics that apply to virtually every low-carb plan, there are also what I would describe as “gray areas” where it will really depend on the individual to figure out for themselves. One such issue is caffeine. If you have read Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution, then you know the late great Dr. Robert C. Atkins addresses this subject a couple of times–but only in passing. Here are the two brief references I found in my mass paperback version of the book: Page 189–“Excessive caffeine has been shown to cause a hypoglycemic reaction, which will provoke cravings and cause you to overeat. Omitting caffeine may be a big sacrifice for you, but, in my experience, weight loss often starts up again as soon as people remove caffeine from their regimen.” Page 222–“Consume caffeine only in moderation.” Other than those two points, Dr. Atkins didn’t say much else about caffeine consumption. Obviously he felt there was enough of a negative metabolic response to caffeine intake for him to dissuade Atkins dieters to try to steer clear of it as much as possible. But what about the impact of caffeine on ketosis? Is there any and what guidelines can people following a low-carb diet use to gauge what amount of caffeine intake they can tolerate while still losing weight? These are some of the questions that were explored by one of my intelligent readers in the following e-mail: Hi Jimmy, I would like to clear something up with your help. I feel there needs to be a summary, possibly a FAQ, on caffeine. Here’s my question: What are the effects of caffeine, ESPECIALLY when one is in ketosis? When talking about caffeine, there are several h Continue reading >>

How Bulletproof Coffee Helps Low Carb Paleo Dry Eyes

How Bulletproof Coffee Helps Low Carb Paleo Dry Eyes

Just about any coffee can stop dry eyes in two ways: 1. Bad coffee tastes bad and has toxins in it, which makes you sad, which makes you cry. Problem solved! 2. The caffeine in coffee acts on certain chemical receptors in your brain, which facilitates the release of tears. Both of these observations are supported by research. The first theory is supported by the fact that I’ve never had street-grade coffee that didn’t leave me in tears, cursing that I spent $4 on something that tastes that burnt. The second way coffee stops dry eyes is supported by a new study that was just published in the journal Ophthalmology. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca, also known as “dry eye syndrome,” is a disorder that usually happens to older people where there is a malfunction in the production and clearance of tears. It also happens to people on very low carb diets for long periods of time. For most people, it’s a minor inconvenience that requires some eye drops and blinking. For others, it can progress into a serious disease that results in loss of vision. This condition affects over 4 million people over the age of 50 in the U.S. A new study has shown that caffeine may be a solution. Before getting into the study details, here is a little background: A previous study found that 13 percent of caffeine users had dry eye syndrome, while 17% of non-caffeine users had the condition. Previous studies had also shown that caffeine stimulates the production of saliva and gastric fluids (like stomach acid), so it seemed likely that it would also increase tear production. In this new study, Japanese researchers divided 78 participants into two groups: One group received caffeine tablets in the first session, and a placebo in the second session. The other group received the same dosage, but th Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Coffee And Insulin, Fat And Post-workout Meals

Dear Mark: Coffee And Insulin, Fat And Post-workout Meals

159 Comments In today’s edition of Dear Mark, I cover two topics near and dear to many of your hearts. First, I discuss the interaction between coffee intake and insulin. Does coffee stimulate its secretion? Does it impair insulin’s function, or our body’s reaction to it? Find out how you should approach coffee on a Primal Blueprint eating plan. Then, I explore the suitability of dietary fat in the post-workout meal. Does it belong? Should you be stocking skim milk, de-fatted chicken breast, non-fat yogurt, and cartons of egg whites for your post-workout meals? If you’ve just lifted something heavy, should you therefore shun the yolks and fear the fat for the rest of the day? Find out below. Let’s go. Does coffee raise insulin levels? A lot of contradictory stuff out there. Hoping you could get to the bottom of it. Also, how does it affect GABA? Thanks Odin What makes coffee research so confusing is that a lot of it is actually caffeine research. You see, researchers love isolating whole food constituents to avoid confounding variables. It’s easier to get a definitive result about caffeine than it is to get one about coffee, because coffee contains huge and diverse levels of antioxidant compounds. If you don’t, and coffee has a health effect, how do you know if it’s the caffeine or something else in coffee causing the effect? That’s helpful, but most of us are drinking coffee – not popping caffeine pills. So, while caffeine is definitely one of the main active compounds in coffee, it’s not the only one. Adjust your interpretation of “coffee” research accordingly. That said, both caffeine and coffee have been shown to exert negative effects on insulin sensitivity. Not on insulin itself, though. As standalone substances (without a meal to accompa Continue reading >>

Increased Sensitivity To Caffeine From New Low Carb Diet?

Increased Sensitivity To Caffeine From New Low Carb Diet?

i have noticed something very strange since i started pursuing a ketogenic diet about a week ago. i have always considered myself immune to the effects of caffeine since i drank many cups of black tea and coffee a day for the past 8 or so years (growing up). since i started making an earnest effort to cut my carbs, pursue Primal eating, up my fat, and stabilize my blood glucose level, and lower my stress levels, my morning Bulletproof coffee is hitting me in a very unpleasant way the past few days: i feel overcaffeinated in a way that has only happened a few times in the past after drinking significant amounts of coffee. my stomach feels sick and my heart is racing and my body feels very edgy. i am wondering if this could be a good sign that i am lowering my cortisol level to a point where caffeine is actually increasing my cortisol to a measurable degree. i am eating a lot of butter and CO with my coffee (a 10oz cup each morning) i am going to start buying decaf now because i feel so icky after drinking my coffee but it is SO weird that i am suddenly exhibiting this because of my history of caffeine tolerance. edited to add: is there anything i can eat as an antidote to this overcaffeinated state??? Continue reading >>

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Via Spanish Caravan, a frequent commenter with let’s just say a “medical background.” ~~~ Physiological Insulin Resistatnce (PIR) results from glucose deficiency the same way mucin deficiency induces dry eyes, nostrils, colon and anemia like symptoms. They’re both ways of preserving glucose for your brain. When you VLC, your muscles become insulin resistant to preserve your glucose for the brain. So while your muscles are running on fatty acids, they become insulin resistant. This leaves glucose for your brain but the net result is your BG going up as you’re “physiologically” insulin resistant. There doesn’t really seem to a problem with this state, as there is with mucin deficiency; it’s not known to induce diabetes or make prediabetics diabetic. At least not according to those who advocate VLCing. I have a feeling however, that this is a disease-prone state. The effects of low carbohydrate diets on insulin sensitivity depend on what is used to replace the dietary carbohydrate, and the nature of the subjects studied. Dietary carbohydrates may affect insulin action, at least in part, via alterations in plasma free fatty acids. In normal subjects a high-carbohydrate/low-GI breakfast meal reduced free fatty acids by reducing the undershoot of plasma glucose, whereas low-carbohydrate breakfasts increased postprandial free fatty acids. Why is it disease-prone? Because high serum free fatty acids are implicated in various disease states, especially immune related (and also diabetes in some cases). High serum FFA and very low trigs that we see among those who VLC are associated with nascent autoimmunity, especially rheumatic autoimmunity. See: Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders. We’re talking about triglycer Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About The Keto Diet

Everything You Need To Know About The Keto Diet

A ketogenic diet is a low carb, high fat diet. One of its main goals is to train your body to get its energy from a whole different source – ketones, rather than glucose. When you eat carbs, your body naturally converts them into glucose and insulin. Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert into energy and is your body’s immediate go-to for fuel. Insulin is what carries the glucose all through your bloodstream and gets the converted energy to where it needs to go. Because of this process, the fats you eat don’t often get used and end up getting stored away. They are considered as more of a backup for your body and because of the high amount of carbs the majority of people consume, fats rarely get touched. The ketogenic diet (AKA keto diet) breaks this cycle. Through the dramatic drop in carbs, your body starts to go into a state known as ketosis. This is what happens when the amount of healthy fats you eat greatly outnumber the amount of carbohydrates you eat. When you start doing this, your body has no choice but to resort to this ketosis state. The fats you eat will start getting converted into ketones through your liver and those ketones will become your body’s main source of energy. This is a whole different way to get your body into a metabolic state. Rather than starving it of calories, you are starving it of carbs, training your whole system to make ketones as your body’s main source of energy. Different Types Of Ketogenic Diets Standard Ketogenic Diet (SKD) – This is the typical form of the diet. It is very low carb and moderate protein. 75% fats, 20% protein and 5% carbs. Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD) – This is a more advanced form of the diet, typically used by athletes. It involves high carb days. For example, 5 keto days will be Continue reading >>

“you Have Literally Saved My Life”

“you Have Literally Saved My Life”

Here’s an impressive life transformation story, from Gareth Hicks: The Email Hej Andreas! Thanks for such an inspirational site! I was informed by my doctor at the end of 2012 that I needed to make some significant changes to my life – as I was nearly 44 lbs (20kg) overweight – and had a very poor fasting lipid profile. This coupled with high blood pressure (routinely 160/120) and little exercise, I was classified as a 15% daily risk of heart attack – and was racing towards CVD. As someone with a history of family heart disease, I knew I needed to do something different! As of tomorrow, 19th Feb, I will have been living a Low Carb High Fat lifestyle for one year. I have lost (and easily kept off) 35 lbs (16 kg) so far – by living on real food – with lots of fats added to make it extra tasty. I have completely removed pasta, most bread (I occasionally use unleavened bread with curry), have almost completely removed sugar – and live on a diet that is mostly curry, cauli-rice and fresh vegetables washed down with a glass of extra dry cava. I have inspired lots of people in the UK to adopt a lchf lifestyle, based on you – and your website – and am currently helping about 20 people on a one-to-one basis, as well as several others via Facebook. I’m a follower on twitter and Facebook – as well as the original DietDoctor.com website – and have created my own interpretation based on what I have learned from you – @curryandcava, www.curryandcava.com (still being developed) and on Facebook – curryandcava.com ;) Many people in the UK are desperate for this type of information – so please keep it coming – and I will keep sharing it !! Please also feel free to have a look at the pages and feedback anything you’d like to highlight! I have done extensi Continue reading >>

Can Caffeine Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Can Caffeine Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Low-carb dieters who consume very few carbohydrates often go into ketosis. Ketosis develops when you use up your glycogen stores and need an alternate source of energy. Your body forms ketone bodies as it breaks down fat to use for energy, and you excrete ketones in the urine. Low-carb dieter use ketone test strips to ensure that they're following the diet correctly and burning fat. Caffeine might disrupt glucose metabolism, which could affect ketosis, although only anecdotal evidence of this exists. Video of the Day Insulin resistance, the inability of cells to respond to and absorb glucose, can raise glucose levels and cause weight gain. Ketosis decreases insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity, meaning the ability of cells to absorb glucose. Insulin helps cells take glucose from the bloodstream to use for energy. Improving insulin sensitivity helps you lose weight. Caffeine might increase insulin resistance. Caffeine and Insulin Resistance Caffeine might increase insulin resistance, which might make losing weight more difficult and also increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, although this has not been clinically proven. A study conducted by researchers from Duke University Medical Center in the August 2004 issue of "Diabetes Care," published by the American Diabetes Association, discussed the effects of caffeine on blood glucose levels and insulin sensitivity. This study showed that 250 mg of caffeine did not change fasting glucose levels but did raise glucose levels after consumption of 75 g of glucose compared with placebo. Although caffeine might raise glucose levels after eating a meal high in carbohydrates, it's unclear that this effect occurs after a low-carbohydrate meal such as those eaten by low-carb dieters. It's also unclear wheth Continue reading >>

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