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Keto Acidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

DKA; Ketoacidosis; Diabetes - ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening problem that affects people with diabetes. It occurs when the body cannot use sugar (glucose) as a fuel source because there is no insulin or not enough insulin. Fat is used for fuel instead. When fat is broken down to fuel the body, chemicals called ketones build up in the body. Various styles of insulin pumps may be utilized by people with diabetes to inject insulin into the body in a controlled, more convenient and discreet manner. During the oral glucose tolerance test your blood glucose is tested two hours after drinking 75 grams of glucose. You are diagnosed with diabetes if your blood glucose level is 200 mg/dl or greater. Various styles of insulin pumps may be utilized by people with diabetes to inject insulin into the body in a controlled, more convenient and discreet manner. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas in response to increased glucose levels in the blood. During the oral glucose tolerance test your blood glucose is tested two hours after drinking 75 grams of glucose. You are diagnosed with diabetes if your blood glucose level is 200 mg/dl or greater. Causes As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Etiology In DKA, there is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin along with an elevation of counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These alterations lead to extreme manifestations of metabolic derangements that can occur in diabetes. The two most common precipitating events are inadequate insulin therapy or infection. Underlying medical conditions such as MI or stroke that provoke the release of counter-regulatory hormones are also likely to result in DKA in patients with diabetes. Drugs that affect carbohydrate metabolism, such as corticosteroids, thiazides, sympathomimetic agents (e.g., dobutamine and terbutaline), and second-generation antipsychotic agents, may participate in the development of DKA. [1] [9] The use of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors has also been implicated in the development of DKA in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. [10] [11] [12] Pathophysiology Reduced insulin concentration or action, along with increased insulin counter-regulatory hormones, leads to the hyperglycemia, volume depletion, and electrolyte imbalance that underlie the pathophysiology of DKA. Hormonal alterations in DKA lead to increased gluconeogenesis, hepatic and renal glucose production, and impaired glucose utilization in peripheral tissues, which result in hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity. Insulin deficiency leads to release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue (lipolysis), hepatic fatty acid oxidation, and formation of ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate), which result in ketonemia and acidosis. Studies have demonstrated the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory biomarkers (e.g., CRP), markers of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidatio Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis When looking at a ketogenic diet and ketosis, it’s common for some people to confuse the process with a harmful, more extreme version of this state known as diabetic ketoacidosis. But there are a lot of misconceptions out there about ketosis vs ketoacidosis, and it’s time to shed some light on the subject by looking at the (very big) differences between the two. An Overview of Ketosis A ketogenic, or keto, diet is centered around the process of ketosis, so it’s important to understand exactly what ketosis is first before we get into whether or not it’s safe (spoiler: it is): Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body is primarily using fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. Burning carbohydrates (glucose) for energy is the default function of the body, so if glucose is available, the body will use that first. But during ketosis, the body is using ketones instead of glucose. This is an amazing survival adaptation by the body for handling periods of famine or fasting, extreme exercise, or anything else that leaves the body without enough glucose for fuel. Those eating a ketogenic diet purposely limit their carb intake (usually between 20 and 50 grams per day) to facilitate this response. That’s why the keto diet focuses on very low carb intake, moderate to low protein intake, and high intakes of dietary fats. Lower protein is important because it prevents the body from pulling your lean muscle mass for energy and instead turns to fat. Ketone bodies are released during ketosis and are created by the liver from fatty acids. These ketones are then used by the body to power all of its biggest organs, including the brain, and they have many benefits for the body we’ll get into later. But first, let’s address a common mi Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Complications Of Ketoacidosis

Cardiovascular Complications Of Ketoacidosis

US Pharm. 2016;41(2):39-42. ABSTRACT: Ketoacidosis is a serious medical emergency requiring hospitalization. It is most commonly associated with diabetes and alcoholism, but each type is treated differently. Some treatments for ketoacidosis, such as insulin and potassium, are considered high-alert medications, and others could result in electrolyte imbalances. Several cardiovascular complications are associated with ketoacidosis as a result of electrolyte imbalances, including arrhythmias, ECG changes, ventricular tachycardia, and cardiac arrest, which can be prevented with appropriate initial treatment. Acute myocardial infarction can predispose patients with diabetes to ketoacidosis and worsen their cardiovascular outcomes. Cardiopulmonary complications such as pulmonary edema and respiratory failure have also been seen with ketoacidosis. Overall, the mortality rate of ketoacidosis is low with proper and urgent medical treatment. Hospital pharmacists can help ensure standardization and improve the safety of pharmacotherapy for ketoacidosis. In the outpatient setting, pharmacists can educate patients on prevention of ketoacidosis and when to seek medical attention. Metabolic acidosis occurs as a result of increased endogenous acid production, a decrease in bicarbonate, or a buildup of endogenous acids.1 Ketoacidosis is a metabolic disorder in which regulation of ketones is disrupted, leading to excess secretion, accumulation, and ultimately a decrease in the blood pH.2 Acidosis is defined by a serum pH <7.35, while a pH <6.8 is considered incompatible with life.1,3 Ketone formation occurs by breakdown of fatty acids. Insulin inhibits beta-oxidation of fatty acids; thus, low levels of insulin accelerate ketone formation, which can be seen in patients with diabetes. Extr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Home > Our Services > Health Info Library > Helping Hands > Diabetes: Ketoacidosis (dka)

Home > Our Services > Health Info Library > Helping Hands > Diabetes: Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (KEY toe as i DOE sis), also known as DKA, is a serious complication of diabetes. When the cells in the body cannot use glucose for energy, there is a buildup of acids called “ketones” in the blood. For the cells to use glucose for energy both glucose and insulin need to be in the blood. Insulin acts like a key to unlock the cell door. It allows glucose in to be used for energy. When cells do not have glucose to use for energy: The body starts to use fat for energy. Ketones are made when fat is used for energy. Ketones are present in the blood and in the urine. Ketones cause the blood to become more acidic. If untreated, this leads to DKA and life-threatening problems. Cause Not enough insulin: Missing doses of insulin Infection, illness or injury (which causes the body to need more insulin) Insulin doses too small If using insulin pump, interruption in delivery of insulin Signs of DKA and When to Test for Ketones You may or may not feel any different when you begin to have ketones. The only way to know is by checking the urine or blood for the presence of ketones. Check for ketones if blood glucose is higher than 300 mg/dl. Check for ketones when ill (fever, flu or vomiting) even if blood glucose is not higher than 300 mg/dl. Warning Signs of DKA Fast breathing Fruity smell to the breath Hard to wake up Feeling sick to the stomach (nausea), belly pain, or vomiting How to Check Urine for Ketones Step 1: Check the expiration date on the bottle. Note that ketone strips expire 6 months after opening bottle. Step 2: Collect urine in a cup. Dip the ketone strip into the cup. Remove it from the urine. Step 3: Wait 15 seconds. Step 4: Match the color on the ketone strip to the colors on the bottle. You can also check blood for ketones. Your health car Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

Understanding Sglt2 Inhibitors' Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Understanding Sglt2 Inhibitors' Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Deepali Dixit, PharmD, BCPS, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy and a Clinical Critical Care Pharmacist in the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. Dr. Dixit has been involved in multiple committees and in leadership positions in regional and national pharmacy and organizations. Dr. Dixit's research interests include sedation and delirium in the critically ill, infectious disease, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patient safety. This article was collaboratively written with Shannon Anthony, PharmD Candidate. In May 2015, the FDA issued a warning about the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis while using SGLT2 inhibitors. That December, the FDA updated the drugs’ labels to include warnings about developing ketoacidosis even with near-normal blood glucose levels.1 SGLT2 inhibitors lower blood glucose levels by decreasing renal glucose reabsorption, which increases urinary glucose excretion.2 Three drugs in this class are currently available in the United States: canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance).1 These medications are approved for managing type 2 diabetes, although they’re increasingly used off-label to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D), and trials are currently being conducted to evaluate their efficacy for this potential indication.3 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) develops most frequently in T1D patients secondary to omission or decreased dosage of insulin, acute illness, or a recent surgical procedure.4 The typical clinical presentation includes hyperglycemia (>250mg/dL), anion-gap acidosis, and elevated plasma and urine ketones.3 Early diagnosis and management of ketoacidosis is vital. The cornerstone DKA treatment Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Serious Complication

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Serious Complication

A balanced body chemistry is crucial for a healthy human body. A sudden drop in pH can cause significant damage to organ systems and even death. This lesson takes a closer look at a condition in which the pH of the body is severely compromised called diabetic ketoacidosis. Definition Diabetic ketoacidosis, sometimes abbreviated as DKA, is a condition in which a high amount of acid in the body is caused by a high concentration of ketone bodies. That definition might sound complicated, but it's really not. Acidosis itself is the state of too many hydrogen ions, and therefore too much acid, in the blood. A pH in the blood leaving the heart of 7.35 or less indicates acidosis. Ketones are the biochemicals produced when fat is broken down and used for energy. While a healthy body makes a very low level of ketones and is able to use them for energy, when ketone levels become too high, they make the body's fluids very acidic. Let's talk about the three Ws of ketoacidosis: who, when, and why. Type one diabetics are the group at the greatest risk for ketoacidosis, although the condition can occur in other groups of people, such as alcoholics. Ketoacidosis usually occurs in type one diabetics either before diagnosis or when they are subjected to a metabolic stress, such as a severe infection. Although it is possible for type two diabetics to develop ketoacidosis, it doesn't happen as frequently. To understand why diabetic ketoacidosis occurs, let's quickly review what causes diabetes. Diabetics suffer from a lack of insulin, the protein hormone responsible for enabling glucose to get into cells. This inability to get glucose into cells means that the body is forced to turn elsewhere to get energy, and that source is fat. As anyone who exercises or eats a low-calorie diet knows, fa Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Dogs Diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. The term “ketoacidosis,” meanwhile, refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies”. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. This condition typically affects older dogs as well as females. In addition, miniature poodles and dachshunds are predisposed to diabetes with ketoacidosis. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the dog's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your dog’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azo Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis In A Non-diabetic Adult With Chronic Etoh Consumption

Ketoacidosis In A Non-diabetic Adult With Chronic Etoh Consumption

Go to: Case Report A 67-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our emergency room with alteration of mental status. She was found on the floor of her apartment, confused without apparent head trauma and no documented loss of consciousness. She admitted chronic alcohol consumption. Her main medical conditions included chronic obstructive lung disease, hypertension, hypothyroidism, major depressive disorder and anxiety. On presentation, she was difficult to arouse, disoriented and showed an important decrease in attention span. She was mildly tachycardic, normotensive, and tachypneic. Her temperature was 37.5 °C rectally. Physical examination was unremarkable. Initial arterial blood gas showed a high anion gap metabolic acidosis (pH 7.23, pCO2 16 mm Hg, HCO3 7 mmol/L, anion gap 45, and lactate 1.0 mmol/L). Her serum glucose at presentation was 12.9 mmol/L and her B-hydroxybutyrate was 7.88 mmol/L. Ketones were present in the urine while glucose was not. Toxicological serum studies did not reveal any acute intoxication. Mild elevation in her liver function tests was noted initially (AST 92 U/L, ALT 56 U/L, and total bilirubin 24 μmol/L) which normalized few days later. Her pancreatic function tests remained benign. Electrolytes imbalances at presentation included hyponatremia (132 mmol/L), hypokalemia (3.0 mmol/L), hypochloremia (84 mmol/L) and hypophosphatemia (0.3 mmol/L). The patient’s presentation was suggestive of a ketoacidosis, while it was still unclear if she was an undiagnosed diabetic. Initial management included insulin and dextrose 10% perfusion (with fluid repletion, thiamine, and electrolytes replacement). Further laboratory investigation revealed an HbA1c of 5.13% and rapid normalization of glycemia, excluding a diagnosis of late-onset type 1 diabetes, i Continue reading >>

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