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Is There A Role For Sodium Bicarbonate In Treating Lactic Acidosis From Shock?

Shock (circulatory) - Wikipedia

Shock (circulatory) - Wikipedia

"Acute shock" redirects here. For the psychological condition, see Acute stress reaction . Shock is a life-threatening medical condition of low blood perfusion to tissues resulting in cellular injury and inadequate tissue function. [1] [2] The typical signs of shock are low blood pressure , rapid heart rate , signs of poor end-organ perfusion (i.e., low urine output, confusion, or loss of consciousness), and weak pulses. The shock index (SI), defined as heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure, is an accurate diagnostic measure that is more useful than hypotension and tachycardia in isolation. [3] Under normal conditions, a number between 0.5 and 0.8 is typically seen. Should that number increase, so does suspicion of an underlying state of shock. Blood pressure alone may not be a reliable sign for shock, as there are times when a person is in circulatory shock but has a stable blood pressure. [4] Circulatory shock is not related to the emotional state of shock . Circulatory shock is a life-threatening medical emergency and one of the most common causes of death for critically ill people. Shock can have a variety of effects, all with similar outcomes, but all relate to a problem with the body's circulatory system. For example, shock may lead to hypoxemia (a lack of oxygen in arterial blood) or cardiac and/or respiratory arrest . [5] One of the key dangers of shock is that it progresses by a positive feedback mechanism. Poor blood supply leads to cellular damage, which results in an inflammatory response to increase blood flow to the affected area. This is normally very useful to match up blood supply level with tissue demand for nutrients. However, if enough tissue causes this, it will deprive vital nutrients from other parts of the body. Additionally, the ability Continue reading >>

Sodium Bicarbonate In The Critically Ill Patient With Metabolic Acidosis

Sodium Bicarbonate In The Critically Ill Patient With Metabolic Acidosis

Sodium bicarbonate in the critically Ill patient with metabolic acidosis Uso de bicarbonato de sdio na acidose metablica do paciente gravemente enfermo Lactic acidosis is an acid-base imbalance frequently found in critically ill patients. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Despite the substantial body of evidence that critical levels of acidemia have several adverse effects on cell function, the use of sodium bicarbonate to treat lactic acidosis in critically ill patients remains highly controversial. This article aimed at: 1) analyzing the main differences between hyperchloremic and organic acidoses, with high anion gap; 2) comparing the risks associated with critical levels of acidemia with those associated with the use of sodium bicarbonate; 3) critically analyzing the literature evidence about the use of sodium bicarbonate for the treatment of lactic acidosis in critically ill patients, with an emphasis on randomized control trials in human beings; and 4) providing a rationale for the judicious use of sodium bicarbonate in that situation. Descriptors: lactic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis, sodium bicarbonate, septic shock. A acidose ltica um distrbio do equilbrio cido-base muito frequente em pacientes internados em unidades de terapia intensiva e est associado a um mau prognstico. Embora exista um acmulo substancial de evidncias de que nveis crticos de acidemia provocam inmeros efeitos adversos sobre o funcionamento celular, a utilizao de bicarbonato de sdio para o tratamento da acidose ltica em pacientes gravemente enfermos permanece alvo de controvrsias. Neste artigo, pretendemos: 1) analisar as principais diferenas entre as acidoses hiperclormicas e as acidoses orgnicas, com nion gap (AG) elevado, visando embasar a discusso sobre os fundamentos da terapia Continue reading >>

Sodium Bicarbonate - Intravenous (iv) Dilution

Sodium Bicarbonate - Intravenous (iv) Dilution

The authors make no claims of the accuracy of the information contained herein; and these suggested doses and/or guidelines are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither GlobalRPh Inc. nor any other party involved in the preparation of this document shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting in whole or part from any user's use of or reliance upon this material. PLEASE READ THE DISCLAIMER CAREFULLY BEFORE ACCESSING OR USING THIS SITE. BY ACCESSING OR USING THIS SITE, YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS SET FORTH IN THE DISCLAIMER. Standard Dilutions [Amount of drug] [Infusion volume] [Infusion rate] May add ordered dose to empty viaflex bag or dilute in 50-1000ml. Monitor ABG's q2-3 hours to assess response. Administer IV either undiluted or diluted in other IV fluid (50-1000ml) depending on fluid status. Osmolarity: 2Na + gluc/18 + BUN/2.8 (nml: 280-295). **Note: treat hypokalemia or hypocalcemia first if present. In all cases, the primary goal in treating metabolic acidosis is to focus on reversal of the underlying process causing the acidosis. Examples: (1) Renal failure: dialysis if needed. (2) Alcoholic ketoacidosis: fluids, electrolytes, thiamine, folic acid. (3) Sepsis/shock: volume resuscitation, vasopressors, etc. (4) Salicylate intoxication: IV fluids, alkalinization of the urine, .... If there is a severe deficit (HCO3- < 10-12 mEq/L and pH<7.2) correct with sodium bicarbonate. Sodium bicarb is also useful if the acidosis is due to inorganic acids (especially if renal disease is present). However, when the acidosis results from organic acids (lactic acid, acetoacetic acid, etc) the role of bicarbonate is controversial. In most cases of DKA or sever lactic acidosis the administration of sodium bicarbonat Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Acidosis: Sodium Bicarbonate And Other Drugs

Treatment Of Acidosis: Sodium Bicarbonate And Other Drugs

Treatment of Acidosis: Sodium Bicarbonate and Other Drugs Lactic acidosis, defined as a lactate level > 5 mmol/1 and a pH 7.35, is far and away the most-important acidosis during critical illness and most of this discussion of acidosis treatment will focus on treatment of lactic acidosis. Even in the face of maximal supportive therapy, lactic acidosis is associated with a mortality of 60-90% [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ], so physicians have long relied on treatments to lower the [H+], such as sodium bicarbonate. Less common than lactic acidosis, and much more amenable to conventional treatments, are ketoacidoses and respiratory acidosis, but these too occasionally prompt consideration of alkalinizing therapies. Lowering the [H+] in blood depends on manipulating the strong ion difference ([SID]), total concentration of non-volatile weak acid buffer (ATOT), or arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2), or raising the total concentration of weak bases, BTOT (normally sufficiently small that it can be ignored). Therefore, potential treatments include: 1. Raise [SID]: a) add strong cations: bicarbonate, carbicarb, dialysis b) remove strong anions: dichloroacetate (DCA), dialysis, thiamine, riboflavin, vasoactive drugs? 2. Lower the paCO2: raise VE or lower VD/VT or VCO2 3. Reduce ATOT: remove albumin, but very limited effect Acute Lung InjurySodium BicarbonateAcute Respiratory Distress SyndromeLactic AcidosisDiabetic Ketoacidosis These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Weil MH, Afifi AA (1970) Experimental and clinical studies on lactate and pyruvate as indicators of th Continue reading >>

Sodium Bicarbonate (baking Soda): Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings

Sodium Bicarbonate (baking Soda): Side Effects, Dosages, Treatment, Interactions, Warnings

What Is Sodium Bicarbonate and How Does It Work? Sodium bicarbonate is indicated in the treatment of metabolic acidosis which may occur in severe renal disease , uncontrolled diabetes , circulatory insufficiency due to shock or severe dehydration , extracorporeal circulation of blood , cardiac arrest and severe primary lactic acidosis . Sodium bicarbonate is further indicated in the treatment of certain drug intoxications, including barbiturates (where dissociation of the barbiturate- protein complex is desired), in poisoning by salicylates or methyl alcohol and in hemolytic reactions requiring alkalinization of the urine to diminish nephrotoxicity of hemoglobin and its breakdown products. Sodium bicarbonate also is indicated in severe diarrhea , which is often accompanied by a significant loss of bicarbonate. Treatment of metabolic acidosis should, if possible, be superimposed on measures designed to control the basic cause of the acidosis e.g., insulin in uncomplicated diabetes, blood volume restoration in shock. But since an appreciable time interval may elapse before all of the ancillary effects are brought about, bicarbonate therapy is indicated to minimize risks inherent to the acidosis itself. Vigorous bicarbonate therapy is required in any form of metabolic acidosis where a rapid increase in plasma total CO2 content is crucial e.g., cardiac arrest, circulatory insufficiency due to shock or severe dehydration, and in severe primary lactic acidosis or severe diabetic acidosis. Adult and Pediatric Dosage Forms and Strengths Dosage Considerations Should be Given as Follows: Adult, Initial: 1 mEq/kg/dose intravenous (IV) x1; base subsequent doses on results of arterial blood pH and PaCO2 as well as calculation of base deficit Repeat doses may be considered in the se Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis; Gap Positive

Metabolic Acidosis; Gap Positive

Metabolic acidosis is defined by low serum pH (less than 7.35-7.45) and low serum bicarbonate. It occurs by one of three major mechanisms: 1. Increased endogenous acid (i.e., lactic acidosis, diabetic ketoacidosis). 2. Decreased renal acid excretion (i.e., renal failure). In determining the underlying etiology for a metabolic acidosis, the serum anion gap must be calculated by subtracting the major measured anions (chloride and bicarbonate) from the major measured cation (sodium). If the result is greater than 12 meq/L (which is the normal value for most laboratories), the acidosis is said to be an anion gap acidosis. The expected anion gap should is lower in hypoalbuminemia and should be corrected - for each decrease of 1gm/dl in albumin, the normal anion gap should be decreased by approximately 2.5 meq/L. A. What is the differential diagnosis for this problem? Anion gap acidosis can be the result from: 1. A fall in unmeasured cations (as seen in hypomagnesemia or hypocalcemia). The most common reasons for a rise in anions are ingestions, lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis and renal failure. Ingestions of multiple different toxins can result in unmeasured anions causing a metabolic gap acidosis. Most commonly salicylate and the alcohols (methanol and ethylene glycol) can lead to severe acidosis. The inhalant toluene may also be a culprit. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of an elevated anion gap acidosis in hospitalized patients, occurring with decreased perfusion causing relative tissue ischemia. This leads to increased lactic acid production and impaired renal excretion with resultant acid accumulation (Type A lactic acidosis). Type B lactic acidosis occurs in patients without overt tissue and can be seen in diabetics on metformin, patients with hematologic and s Continue reading >>

Acid Base In The Critically Ill - Part V - Enough With The Bicarb Already

Acid Base In The Critically Ill - Part V - Enough With The Bicarb Already

Today's topic comes from a debate I have been having with Steve Smith of the amazing EKG Blog . The main thrust of the debate started with this question Does Bicarb Fix pH if You Can't Increase Minute Ventilation? When you can adjust PaCO2 to maintain a certain value (i.e. you increase minute ventilation), bicarb will raise pH as evidenced by this animal study (Crit Care Med 1996; 24:827-834). However, if you can't blow off the CO2 then the effects on pH will not be there (J Pediatr 1977;91(2):287). In this study, NaBicarb did not correct the pH, while CarbiCarb did (Carbicarb: an effective substitute for NaHCO3 for the treatment of acidosis. (Surgery 102:835839). This review article recommends against bicarb for permissive hypercapnia (Intensive Care Med (2004) 30:347356). This study furthers the idea that NaBicarb is not all that great in closed systems (J Pediatr 1972;80(4):671) and then this discussion explores all of the biochemical reasons why administering bicarbonate as a rapid push in a closed system is a bad idea ( J Pediatr. 1972 Apr;80(4):681-2 .). Here is a quote from another review article (Anesthesiology 1990;72(6):1064): The key concept in the equation [above] is that pH is not related to the absolute value of either bicarbonate concentration nor PCo2, but rather to their ratio. When exogenous bicarbonate is administered during acidemia, bicarbonate reacts with hydrogen ions to form carbonic acid. Physicochemical equilibrium is shifted, favoring dissociation of carbonic acid to C02 and water. C02 partial pressure increases. The degree of alkaliniza- tion resulting from increased [HC03] is limited by the rise in Pco2* In (open) systems where increases in PCo2 are prevented (by ventilation) alkalination occurs. When CO2 cannot be eliminated, the pH of the Continue reading >>

Hemodynamic Consequences Of Severe Lactic Acidosis In Shock States: From Bench To Bedside

Hemodynamic Consequences Of Severe Lactic Acidosis In Shock States: From Bench To Bedside

Hemodynamic consequences of severe lactic acidosis in shock states: from bench to bedside Kimmoun et al.; licensee BioMed Central.2015 The Erratum to this article has been published in Critical Care 2017 21:40 Lactic acidosis is a very common biological issue for shock patients. Experimental data clearly demonstrate that metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, participates in the reduction of cardiac contractility and in the vascular hyporesponsiveness to vasopressors through various mechanisms. However, the contributions of each mechanism responsible for these deleterious effects have not been fully determined and their respective consequences on organ failure are still poorly defined, particularly in humans. Despite some convincing experimental data, no clinical trial has established the level at which pH becomes deleterious for hemodynamics. Consequently, the essential treatment for lactic acidosis in shock patients is to correct the cause. It is unknown, however, whether symptomatic pH correction is beneficial in shock patients. The latest Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines recommend against the use of buffer therapy with pH 7.15 and issue no recommendation for pH levels <7.15. Furthermore, based on strong experimental and clinical evidence, sodium bicarbonate infusion alone is not recommended for restoring pH. Indeed, bicarbonate induces carbon dioxide generation and hypocalcemia, both cardiovascular depressant factors. This review addresses the principal hemodynamic consequences of shock-associated lactic acidosis. Despite the lack of formal evidence, this review also highlights the various adapted supportive therapy options that could be putatively added to causal treatment in attempting to reverse the hemodynamic consequences of shock-associated lactic Continue reading >>

Is There A Role For Sodium Bicarbonate In Treating Lactic Acidosis From Shock?

Is There A Role For Sodium Bicarbonate In Treating Lactic Acidosis From Shock?

Is there a role for sodium bicarbonate in treating lactic acidosis from shock? 30 Jul 2008 | Controversial, Review / Commentary The review again brings to light the important issue of treatment of acute severe metabolic acidosis with base. The authors also summarize the mechanism of lactic acidosis and the evidence for and against base therapy and come to the conclusion that there is no support for this treatment presently when blood pH is higher than 7.15. The use of sodium bicarbonate in the treatment of severe lactic acidosis, defined as blood pH lower... To read the rest of this recommendation and access over 145,000 article recommendations from 3,700+ journals across biomedicine, register Send a recommendation to your institution's librarian or information manager to request an extended free trial for articles in biology and medicine, contributed inclusion in F1000Prime to help you filter recommendations, plus relevant articles as engine clusters of related articles and be alerted as soon as similar articles appear in If you think you should be able to access this content, please contact us . If you've forgotten your password, please enter your email address below and we'll send you instructions on how to reset your password. The email address should be the one you originally registered with F1000. Email address not recognised, please try again We are unable to reset your password, please contact [email protected] to reactivate your account, quoting error code UACC/DEL You registered with F1000 via Google, so we cannot reset your password. If you still need help with your Google account password, please click here . You registered with F1000 via Facebook, so we cannot reset your password. If you still need help with your Facebook account password, please click here . Continue reading >>

Is There A Role For Sodium Bicarbonate In Treating Lactic Acidosis From Shock?

Is There A Role For Sodium Bicarbonate In Treating Lactic Acidosis From Shock?

Curr Opin Crit Care. 2008 Aug;14(4):379-83. doi: 10.1097/MCC.0b013e3283069d5c. Is there a role for sodium bicarbonate in treating lactic acidosis from shock? University of British Columbia, Critical Care Research Laboratories, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Bicarbonate therapy for severe lactic acidosis remains a controversial therapy. The most recent 2008 Surviving Sepsis guidelines strongly recommend against the use of bicarbonate in patients with pH at least 7.15, while deferring judgment in more severe acidemia. We review the mechanisms causing lactic acidosis in the critically ill and the scientific rationale behind treatment with bicarbonate. There is little rationale or evidence for the use of bicarbonate therapy for lactic acidosis due to shock. We agree with the Surviving Sepsis guidelines recommendation against the use of bicarbonate for lactic acidosis for pH at least 7.15 and we further recommend a lower target pH of 7.00 or less. If bicarbonate is used, consideration must be given to slow infusion and a plan for clearing the CO2 that is produced and measuring and correcting ionized calcium as the resultant 10% drop may decrease cardiac and vascular contractility and responsiveness to catecholamines. When continuous renal replacement therapy is used during severe acidosis, we recommend bicarbonate-based replacement fluid over citrate as citrate may increase the strong ion gap. Effective therapy of lactic acidosis due to shock is to reverse the cause. Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Treatment Of Acute Non-anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis

Treatment of acute non-anion gap metabolic acidosis Medical and Research Services VHAGLA Healthcare System, Division of Nephrology, VHAGLA Healthcare System Correspondence to: Jeffrey A. Kraut; E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Clinical Kidney Journal, Volume 8, Issue 1, 1 February 2015, Pages 9399, Jeffrey A. Kraut, Ira Kurtz; Treatment of acute non-anion gap metabolic acidosis, Clinical Kidney Journal, Volume 8, Issue 1, 1 February 2015, Pages 9399, Acute non-anion gap metabolic acidosis, also termed hyperchloremic acidosis, is frequently detected in seriously ill patients. The most common mechanisms leading to this acidbase disorder include loss of large quantities of base secondary to diarrhea and administration of large quantities of chloride-containing solutions in the treatment of hypovolemia and various shock states. The resultant acidic milieu can cause cellular dysfunction and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. The associated change in the chloride concentration in the distal tubule lumen might also play a role in reducing the glomerular filtration rate. Administration of base is often recommended for the treatment of acute non-anion gap acidosis. Importantly, the blood pH and/or serum bicarbonate concentration to guide the initiation of treatment has not been established for this type of metabolic acidosis; and most clinicians use guidelines derived from studies of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Therapeutic complications resulting from base administration such as volume overload, exacerbation of hypertension and reduction in ionized calcium are likely to be as common as with high anion gap metabolic acidosis. On the other hand, exacerbation of intracellular acidosis due to the excessive generation of carbon dioxide migh Continue reading >>

Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Bicarbonate Therapy In Severe Metabolic Acidosis

Abstract The utility of bicarbonate administration to patients with severe metabolic acidosis remains controversial. Chronic bicarbonate replacement is obviously indicated for patients who continue to lose bicarbonate in the ambulatory setting, particularly patients with renal tubular acidosis syndromes or diarrhea. In patients with acute lactic acidosis and ketoacidosis, lactate and ketone bodies can be converted back to bicarbonate if the clinical situation improves. For these patients, therapy must be individualized. In general, bicarbonate should be given at an arterial blood pH of ≤7.0. The amount given should be what is calculated to bring the pH up to 7.2. The urge to give bicarbonate to a patient with severe acidemia is apt to be all but irresistible. Intervention should be restrained, however, unless the clinical situation clearly suggests benefit. Here we discuss the pros and cons of bicarbonate therapy for patients with severe metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis is an acid-base disorder characterized by a primary consumption of body buffers including a fall in blood bicarbonate concentration. There are many causes (Table 1), and there are multiple mechanisms that minimize the fall in arterial pH. A patient with metabolic acidosis may have a normal or even high pH if there is another primary, contravening event that raises the bicarbonate concentration (vomiting) or lowers the arterial Pco2 (respiratory alkalosis). Metabolic acidosis differs from “acidemia” in that the latter refers solely to a fall in blood pH and not the process. A recent online survey by Kraut and Kurtz1 highlighted the uncertainty over when to give bicarbonate to patients with metabolic acidosis. They reported that nephrologists will prescribe therapy at a higher pH compared with Continue reading >>

Efficient Extra- And Intracellular Alkalinization Improves Cardiovascular Functions In Severe Lactic Acidosis Induced By Hemorrhagic Shock | Anesthesiology | Asa Publications

Efficient Extra- And Intracellular Alkalinization Improves Cardiovascular Functions In Severe Lactic Acidosis Induced By Hemorrhagic Shock | Anesthesiology | Asa Publications

Efficient Extra- and Intracellular Alkalinization Improves Cardiovascular Functions in Severe Lactic Acidosis Induced by Hemorrhagic Shock From the CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Institut National de la Sant Et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) U1116, Equipe 2, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, France (A.K., N.D., and B.L.); INSERM U1116, Equipe 2, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, France (N.S., K.I., and C.S.); and Critallographie, Rsonnance Magntique et Modlisation (CRM2), Unit Mdicale de Recherche (UMR), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut Jean Barriol, Facult des Sciences et Technologies, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, France (J.-M.E. and S.L.). From the CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Institut National de la Sant Et de la Recherche Mdicale (INSERM) U1116, Equipe 2, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, France (A.K., N.D., and B.L.); INSERM U1116, Equipe 2, Facult de Mdecine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, France (N.S., K.I., and C.S.); and Critallographie, Rsonnance Magntique et Modlisation (CRM2), Unit Mdicale de Recherche (UMR), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut Jean Barriol, Facult des Sciences et Technologies, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France; Universit de Lorraine, Nancy, France (J.-M.E. and S.L.). From the CHU Nancy, Service de Ranimation Mdicale Brabois, Pole Cardiovasculaire et Ranimation Mdicale, Hpital Bra Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Description Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis due to the inadequate clearance of lactic acid from the blood. Lactate is a byproduct of anaerobic respiration and is normally cleared from the blood by the liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. Lactic acidosis occurs when the body's buffering systems are overloaded and tends to cause a pH of ≤7.25 with plasma lactate ≥5 mmol/L. It is usually caused by a state of tissue hypoperfusion and/or hypoxia. This causes pyruvic acid to be preferentially converted to lactate during anaerobic respiration. Hyperlactataemia is defined as plasma lactate >2 mmol/L. Classification Cohen and Woods devised the following system in 1976 and it is still widely used:[1] Type A: lactic acidosis occurs with clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. Type B: lactic acidosis occurs without clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. It is further subdivided into: Type B1: due to underlying disease. Type B2: due to effects of drugs or toxins. Type B3: due to inborn or acquired errors of metabolism. Epidemiology The prevalence is very difficult to estimate, as it occurs in critically ill patients, who are not often suitable subjects for research. It is certainly a common occurrence in patients in high-dependency areas of hospitals.[2] The incidence of symptomatic hyperlactataemia appears to be rising as a consequence of the use of antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV infection. It appears to increase in those taking stavudine (d4T) regimens.[3] Causes of lactic acid Continue reading >>

The Use Of Sodium Bicarbonate In The Treatment Of Acidosis In Sepsis: A Literature Update On A Long Term Debate

The Use Of Sodium Bicarbonate In The Treatment Of Acidosis In Sepsis: A Literature Update On A Long Term Debate

Volume2015(2015), Article ID605830, 7 pages The Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in the Treatment of Acidosis in Sepsis: A Literature Update on a Long Term Debate 1Internal Medicine Department, University Hospital of Patras, 26500 Rion, Greece 2University of Patras School of Medicine, 26500 Rion, Greece 3Intensive Care Department, Brugmann University Hospital, 1030 Brussels, Belgium 4Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA Received 22 March 2015; Revised 29 June 2015; Accepted 1 July 2015 Copyright 2015 Dimitrios Velissaris et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Introduction. Sepsis and its consequences such as metabolic acidosis are resulting in increased mortality. Although correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate seems a reasonable approach, there is ongoing debate regarding the role of bicarbonates as a therapeutic option. Methods. We conducted a PubMed literature search in order to identify published literature related to the effects of sodium bicarbonate treatment on metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. The search included all articles published in English in the last 35 years. Results. There is ongoing debate regarding the use of bicarbonates for the treatment of acidosis in sepsis, but there is a trend towards not using bicarbonate in sepsis patients with arterial blood gas . Conclusions. Routine use of bicarbonate for treatment of severe acidemia and lactic acidosis due to sepsis is subject of controversy, and current opinion does not favor routine use of bicarbonates. However, available evidence is inconclusive, and Continue reading >>

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