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Is Ketosis Worth It

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Should You Combine A Ketogenic Diet With Paleo?

Should You Combine A Ketogenic Diet With Paleo?

Have you noticed that you feel better after adopting a Paleo diet? There’s actually one more tweak to your diet that you can make to feel more energized, lose weight faster, and become mentally clearer. That tweak is to convert your Paleo diet to a Paleo/ketogenic (Keto) diet. Fair warning, a Keto diet isn’t appropriate for all people, but by the end of this article you will know if giving it a try is worth it. A Crash Course In Keto Glycolysis and ketogenesis are the two processes that the body uses to produce usable energy for your cells. Glycolysis is dominant when carbohydrates are available. It involves converting glucose into pyruvate, which produces a net gain of ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate, the basic unit of cellular energy). But when your carbohydrate stores run out, that’s when it’s ketogenesis’ time to shine. Compared to the small amount of carbohydrate stores you have at any time, you have a massive reserve of fat that can be used for energy. Through ketogenesis, stored fat is broken down and converted to ketone bodies (a type of molecule) which can then be used to create ATP. When your body is relying on ketone bodies for energy, it is said to be in a state of ketosis. The image below shows a simplistic version of these two energy systems. Note that almost all of the ATP is made in the dark blue citric acid cycle (TCA) at the bottom. What is a Ketogenic Diet? Remember that ketosis only occurs when you are more or less out of carbs. A ketogenic diet is designed to keep you in ketosis, mainly by limiting how many carbohydrates you eat during a day. The typical starting guideline is 50 grams per day, but some people need to restrict further than that, while others can eat more and still remain in ketosis. It’s important to understand that the body Continue reading >>

Ketosis, The Weight-loss Key To The Atkins Diet, Does Work, But At A Price

Ketosis, The Weight-loss Key To The Atkins Diet, Does Work, But At A Price

Robert Atkins’ contentious death cast doubt on his already-controversial namesake diet. But he was onto something, apparently, because aspects of his high-fat regimen live on. Ketosis, a low-carb eating plan, promises to make people really thin, really quickly. Going keto is now a fad diet of its very own — look how good LeBron James looks! — despite concerns about its safety. In the world of crash diets, instant gratification is king, and ketosis appears to deliver rapid weight loss at full speed. That is, if you’re willing to take the risks. Phase one of the Atkins Diet had banked on ketosis, the body’s so-called “fat-burning” mode, which seemed to live up to the hype. Under normal conditions, the body fuels itself by burning up carbohydrates, fats, and protein, in that order. That’s because the simple sugars contained in pasta, rice, and sugar are easier molecules to break down. But if your body has no linguine to digest and is desperate for game fuel, it has no choice but to burn up the fat you’ve got on hand (or on love handles). And isn’t that the weight-loss dream? But ketosis is so-named because going low-carb causes the liver to break down fats into molecules called ketones, which can also be used a fuel source. The problem is, having too many ketones floating around can be dangerous. Diabetics unable to control their insulin levels can enter a state called ketoacidosis, when the buildup of ketones causes the blood to become dangerously acidic, which in turn messes with your organs. (At this point, ketones spill over into the urine, giving it a characteristic fruity smell. The term diabetes mellitus roughly means “pissing honey.”) Supporters of the Atkins Diet contend that the amount of ketones present in the blood during ketosis isn’t Continue reading >>

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

It’s almost a universally accepted fact that diets leave you hungry. After all, that rumbling tummy two hours after mealtime (not to mention, strict and time-consuming calorie counting) is the reason most New Year’s resolutions fail by February, right? But Dr. Jacob Wilson and Ryan Lowery, the authors of The Ketogenic Bible, say you don’t need to go hungry or count calories to lose weight. The ketogenic diet, also referred to as “keto,” is a dieting method gaining popularity from people with diabetes to CrossFitters. “The ketogenic diet induces ketosis, which is a state where your body is running primarily off of fat and ketones,” explains Wilson, instead of sugar from carbs. “That can occur through lowering your carbohydrates and having very high fat intake.” Specifically, the ketogenic diet targets about 80 percent of calories from fat, 15 percent from protein and 5 percent from carbohydrates. RELATED: Why You Should Eat More Fat and Less Sugar The Upside of Ketosis While this method may have gained popularity among athletes and other hard-core fitness buffs, they’re far from the only ones who will see benefits from this method. “When you implement a well-formulated proper ketogenic diet, you can see improvement in performance and body composition at the same time,” says Lowery. You’ll look leaner and shed fat, but you won’t feel sapped of energy like when you decrease calories. The bonus is you won’t experience the post-meal crash associated with a higher-carb diet, he says. Lowery also says that for most ketogenic diet newbies, there won’t be a need to count overall calories either. As long as you’re paying attention to your diet and inducing ketosis through high-fat and low-carb consumption, most dieters automatically hit a calorie Continue reading >>

Should You Have Cheat Meals On A Ketogenic Diet?

Should You Have Cheat Meals On A Ketogenic Diet?

Damn does that cake look good! Cheat meals. Everyone thinks about them when following any diet, and the ketogenic diet is no exception. You might be wondering if you should have cheat meals while going keto. Is it worth it? Is it okay? Will it mess up your progress completely? Intellectually, why would you want to eat something that isn’t in line with your goals or your health? Let’s face it, cheat day meals are bad for you. We know it. The ketogenic diet is simple, but not always easy, and there are some grey areas, so lLet’s talk a little bit about what happens when you have cheat meals and whether or not they’re worth it. You might know people who do low-carb long-term and schedule cheat meals in at regular times, such as on the weekends or set days each month. While this creates a healthy mindset around not needing to be perfect, things are a little different with the ketogenic diet. Since keto is stricter than other low-carb diets, (see our post on keto vs. Atkins) it’s more tempting to have cheat meals. However, the effects of them can be more dramatic. Disadvantages of Cheat Meals on the Ketogenic Diet Here are some consequences of having cheat meals. These are things to consider before flying off the deep end with some emotional eating. Let’s get the big one out of the way first, Cheating Takes You out of Ketosis Since cheating on the keto diet more than likely will take you out of ketosis—especially if the cheat meal or snack is carb-heavy—you have to be prepared for this fact. Know that it’ll likely set you back some and take some time to get back into a ketogenic state. When you have eaten what you suspect was a “cheat meal,” put it to the acid test, and test your ketone levels. People are often surprised that they stay in ketosis after Continue reading >>

The Only Diet You Should Ever Consider (ketogenic Diet)

The Only Diet You Should Ever Consider (ketogenic Diet)

You are what you eat. If you feel like shit – that’s because you eat like shit. Lately (last 3-4 months) I’ve been running several experiments to find a diet on which I can perform optimally. I’m a big believer that health is one of the key ingredients for a better life; If your nutrition is in order, you’ll have more energy. If you have more energy, your brain functions better. If your brain functions better, you make better choices. Your life quality is the product of your choices. Better input, better output. Simple, right? There’s a lot of conflicting opinions on this topic, but I’ve finally settled on a diet that seems to work great. In this article I’ll go in-depth on the ketogenic diet. I’m convinced that a diet, high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbohydrates is optimal for (almost) anyone. If the whole world would switch to this diet, we’d see a dramatic decline in health expenses globally (+-500B/year) I’ll also be using a Color code in this article, like so: Difficult words that make me feel smart That will be all. —————————————————- What Is A Ketogenic Diet? A ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat, moderate in protein and low (or no) carbs. It’s based on the premise that humans were never designed to eat so much damn carbs. In the paleolithic era, carbohydrates were only available seasonally. To supply food for a constantly growing population, we’ve turned to (cheaper) mass production of corn, wheat, soy and other modified crops (crap(s)). This hasn’t only degraded the quality of grains but also the amount it represents in our diet. Literally turning the food pyramid upside-down since agriculture became the established norm. Grains are cheaper to produce and maintain, compared to Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto Os Review

Pruvit Keto Os Review

I'm Mike and I've been a personal trainer for over 10 years and I first heard about ketosis way back before it was even a big thing. I've been more or less on the ketogenic diet full-time ever since. When Keto-OS came out, people had been talking about Keto-OS being the go-to product for quickly getting into ketosis and even allowing you to cheat. Me being a skeptic, I set out on a 3 month strict review project, to get to the bottom of whether or not Keto-OS actually works. After months of testing blood samples and body calibrations, I am about to give you the conclusion of what I found from my review down below. KETO OS is the latest product from Pruvit and stands for "Ketone Operating System." This product is an exogenous ketone drink, which means it may provide a multitude of benefits, ranging from athletic performance enhancement, more efficient weight loss, cancer prevention, cognitive improvement and anti-inflammatory properties, among other things. Its ability to essentially trick the body into burning fat instead of carbs (a state known as ketosis) can also result in more rapid weight loss than you may have thought possible. This is what Pruvit had to say: Keto-OS is your “ketone operating system”. It was one of the First Therapeutic Ketone Supplements on the market. The proprietary blend is owned by Prüvit and is Dr. Approved, Lab Tested, University backed and the technology in Keto-OS is patent pending, developed by one of the most world renown Dr.’s and experts on Ketosis. Prüvit was the first company approved by University of South Florida to acquire the sub-license rights to use this patent pending technology. It is a powder that you mix with 8=10 oz. of water. Keto-OS is Pruvit’s flagship product and is the first product the company sold when it Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Worth Trying?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Worth Trying?

If you’re a fitness enthusiast, weight loss seeker or general health information consumer, you’ve likely heard of the ketogenic (keto) diet. You’ve probably also heard some amazing success stories where people have lost in excess of 1-2 pounds a day while following this particular diet. Years ago, I was personally asked to vet a ketogenic inspired diet called the Tisanroeica Diet, which is a Mediterranean-style version that’s widely popular in Italy. After having shed 10 pounds in less than a week, I can certainly attest to the powerful weight loss effects of going keto. And, to this day, whenever I’m looking to quickly drop a few stubborn pounds in a finite amount of time, the ketogenic diet is my go-to regimen. But, don’t just take my words at face value and go jumping on the keto bandwagon. As an avid athlete and blogger who just happens to be an expert in health, fitness and nutrition, I’m always mixing it up and trying new things. I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention that despite it being an almost guaranteed weight loss method, switching to a ketogenic diet can come with some real drawbacks. So, before you even think about trying it, here’s what you need to know. Basics of the Ketogenic Diet In and of itself, the ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate (low-carb) diet characterized by a relatively high intake of fat with moderate consumption of protein. As its name implies, this diet is specifically designed to activate a metabolic process called “ketosis”. Ketosis markedly increases the body’s inherent fat burning potential in a way that supports dramatic weight loss, oftentimes, even in the absence of significant calorie restriction. Related Article: 3 Highly Effective Ways to Lose Weight Without Counting Calories Truth is, there’s not Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

I Cheated On Keto, What Now? Cheating On A Ketogenic Diet

I Cheated On Keto, What Now? Cheating On A Ketogenic Diet

Before we begin, if you’re just starting out on Keto, make sure you don’t cheat during the first 2-4 weeks on a Ketogenic Diet, or you’ll make it harder for your body to properly adapt by kicking yourself in and out of Ketosis. There is no need for bro-science carb-ups on Keto, especially not while still adapting. All you should be focusing on is making your transition from a sugar burner to a fat burner as easy and smooth as possible. Now that we got that out of the way, we all have lives to live and there are special occasions that call for a cheat meal, that’s higher in carbs and not Keto friendly. I’m talking about something like a wedding, birthday, a family reunion or when you’re traveling and you want to try some local specialties. Just make sure it’s worth it and don’t go crazy. It will slow down your weight loss, but it’s not the end of the world as many make it out to be. You did not fail on your diet and you don’t have to start over from the beginning. Just try to prevent that cheat meal turning into a cheat day which then turns into a whole week of binging, which can really set you back in your progress. If your cheat meal happened to be higher in carbs, you can expect an energy crash shortly after. When that happens, having some MCT oil or coconut oil with a cup of coffee or tea can be very helpful for getting some of your energy back, especially if you were planning to still get some focused work done that day. Because of elevated insulin after a cheat meal, you should also expect to get hungry again sooner than you normally do when following a Ketogenic Diet. You’ll also likely have to fight off more cravings for a while. The following day, it’s likely that you will weigh a little more, but don’t be alarmed. You did not completel Continue reading >>

Being Fat Adapted Versus

Being Fat Adapted Versus "in Ketosis" (pt.1/3)

UPDATE!! (9/20/2017) I have a new post that explains how and why the body produces ketones, It will help you understand much better the difference between burning fat and having a fat-based metabolism, versus being "in ketosis." It's very long, but I think it's worth reading if you'd really like to understand this -- and if you want to stop freaking out about your ketone levels. (If you click over to that post and want to read only the section that explains the difference between ketosis and running on fat, scroll way down to where it says Ketogenesis: How and Why Do We Make Ketones? Also: Fat Adaptation versus Ketosis.) Happy reading! If I never hear or read those six words, in that order, ever again, I’ll be one happy individual. Based on what I come across on low-carb forums, blogs, and videos, there is a lot of confusion about the correct use of urine ketone test strips (which I’ll sometimes refer to as ketostix, since “ketone test strips” is a mouthful, even when you’re only reading). So allow me to ‘splain a little bit about how to interpret these things, and what role they should play—if any—in your low-carb life. First and foremost is the most important thing you will read in today’s post. (And it is so important that I will likely repeat it in all the posts to follow in this little series. Plus, you can tell it’s important because it’s red, bold, in italics, and all caps, hehheh.) You can be in ketosis and not lose body fat, and you can lose body fat without being in ketosis. Here is an exhaustive, comprehensive list of everything urine ketone test strips tell you: There is acetoacetate in your urine. That’s it. Nothing more. Nada más. Game over. Finito. The fat lady has sung, and Elvis has left the building. Your worth as a human being Continue reading >>

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

Should Endurance Athletes Go Keto? Ketosis And Ketogenic Diets For Endurance Athletes

When it comes to weight loss and endurance performance, dietary ketosis is the strategy everyone is asking about this year. On the surface, ketosis or a ketogenic diet offers everything an endurance athlete could dream of: endless energy, freedom from bonking, and an efficient pathway to weight loss. The diet has been all over mainstream magazines, it’s the subject of several new books, and the supplement companies have already jumped in with new products and a ton of marketing dollars. So, is it time for cyclists, triathletes, and runners to go Keto? First, a refresher course on what a ketogenic diet is. To achieve dietary or nutritional ketosis you need to severely restrict carbohydrate intake (fewer than 50 grams of CHO/day) so the body transitions to using ketones for fueling muscles and the brain. Ketones are produced from fat, which is why nutritional ketosis is so appealing to sedentary people as a weight loss solution. It’s appealing to athletes because we have a virtually unlimited reserve of fat calories to pull from but can only store 1600-2000 calories worth of carbohydrate in muscles, blood, and the liver. An athlete fueled by ketones would be theoretically “bonk-proof”, since bonking is the result of running low on blood glucose. [blog_promo promo_categories=”coaching” ids=”” /] Dietary ketosis for athletes is one of the most hotly contested subjects right now. Proponents point to the metabolic advantage of relying on fat instead of carbohydrate, and critics point out the physiological limitations of eliminating carbohydrate as a fuel for performance. You’ll find bias in both groups, either because scientists and coaches (including me) have been in the high-carbohydrate camp for many years, or because there’s a lot of money to be made b Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Worth It?

The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Worth It?

If you keep even a toe dipped in the waters of social media or the internet at large, you have most likely heard someone singing the praises of the ketogenic diet in recent times. At first glance, it’s obvious why. Many people report impressive fat loss when following the diet and it doesn’t take a nutrition degree to observe that the average human eats too many carbohydrates and are overweight or obese. On the face of it, something that is based around moderate protein intake and minimal carbohydrate consumption sounds like a winner for body composition. I have used variations of the ketogenic diet for varying amounts of time with every kind of person from those wanting to look hot to people with bad health problems. My intention is not to blindly support or dismiss any method because, as with many things in fitness the real answer is ‘it depends’. The ketogenic diet is not without its downsides and is often altered and tweaked to the point it’s no longer a ketogenic diet. As you will see, my personal opinion is that a strict, standard ketogenic diet can be useful for 4-6 weeks for rapid fat loss, improving eating habits and fast changes to important health markers. However, it is not physiologically possible to sustain intense, anaerobic exercise on a ketogenic diet as it cannot be fuelled by fat or ketones. Simply from a performance perspective alone, a standard ketogenic diet cannot support intense training which should be the backbone of any long-term training plan whether the objective is sports performance or just looking better. The reality is that there is little evidence that a standard ketogenic diet out performs any other well structure diet based on natural food and calorie control when comparing FAT LOSS over months or years. Initial WEIGHT LOSS Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

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