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Is Ketosis Worth It

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Work And Is The Diet Worth It?

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Work And Is The Diet Worth It?

There are many different diet types out there and some of them are supposed to be revolutionary for weight loss. Today, I want to talk about one specific type, a ketogenic diet. This is a specific form of a low carb diet and one that has become exceptionally popular. That’s really not surprising, as ketogenic diets have been linked to health benefits and also substantial weight loss. But, how does a ketogenic diet work? After all, it’s no good simply claiming that a diet works. Most diets work to some degree for a short time. So, what is it that makes a ketogenic diet special? Well, to understand that, we have to take a look at the science behind this type of diet. Before we get started, I do want to say that ketosis is a little complicated. In this post, I’m going to provide an overview of the diet, including how it works and the benefits that it offers. But, I’m going to avoid going too deeply into the complexity of the diet, as that information can get confusing quickly. Nevertheless, this post will still answer the question, how does a ketogenic diet work. Ketogenic diets actually come under a few different names. For example, you may sometimes hear it called a ketosis diet or even just a keto diet. These names all refer to the same concept, they’re just different terms that are used. The names are all based on the concept of ketosis. In some cases, you may also hear the name nutritional ketosis or nutritional ketosis diet. That term still means the same thing and it’s mostly just a clarification. All of these various names come from the same underlying concept, the idea of ketosis. Ketosis is a specific metabolic state where your body is operating in a different way. Specifically, the body produces ketone bodies (or ketones), including acetone and aceto Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Worth It?

Ketosis: Worth It?

Ketosis, or “keto”, is the big thing right now. The dieting hemispheres go through different phases – low fat, carb cycling, ketosis, a plethora of cleanses, “gluten-free” – and at the moment, ketosis seems to be the king of the crop in fitness circles. BHB salts (ketone salts) are huge in the supplement game right now as well, with companies such as Granite Supplements, Giant Sports, and MPA Supps all coming out with and industry-leading and innovative ketone salt supplements to assist with getting you into and maintaining a ketogenic state. That being said, there are a few things that need to be addressed. Is ketosis a worthwhile metabolic state for performance, muscle gain, or fat loss? Is your diet even conducive to inducing a ketogenic state? Is the rigidity of the diet worth the results? Ketosis is Not Necessarily Conducive to High-Intensity Performance As an athlete, when one weighs the cons and pros of hopping head-first into keto, one must factor in the diet’s performance impact. A 2014 study of cyclists aged 28-32 years, who competed in off-road cycling with a training experience of at least 5 years and a minimal VO2max of 55 mL/kg/min, led to a simple conclusion. Though ketosis did indeed increase long-term endurance (based upon sessions that lasted roughly two hours), it also drastically decreased short-term high intensity performance. The ketosis-tuned (keto-adapated) athletes also experienced a significantly lower level of muscle damage from lactic acid, leading to more rapid recovery between sessions. Each athlete must consider their performance goals – strength and explosiveness athletes would be better of utilizing a traditional dieting method that incorporates an adequate amount of carbohydrates, while endurance athletes would fare quit Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Benefits – Is It Worth Cutting Out Carbohydrates?

Ketogenic Diet Benefits – Is It Worth Cutting Out Carbohydrates?

Are you obsessed with carbs and couldn’t stand even the thought of cutting them out of your life? Thinking about cutting carbs to you must be a nightmare right? Now i’m not telling you that I am the master ketosis man that will give you all the right answers and rebuttals as to why you SHOULD be cutting out carbs. But from personal experience, this shit just works. I’m going to explain to you guys some benefits that have research to back it up as well as the benefits that I’ve been experiencing since I started this whole keto craze. A lot of the buzz out there on the internet is using “the ketogenic diet” simply to sell other weight loss products and supplements. But if you research a little further, there’s actually a lot of NEW studies and research popping up showing how beneficial the ketogenic diet really is. It’s always associated with weight loss but to tell you the truth, I started a ketogenic diet more for its mental health benefits. True story: A friend of mine asked why I was eating such a weird diet but was intrigued when he saw the results I was getting while eating bacon and stuff. Fast forward a week, he calls me up saying, “dude I feel like i’m on cocaine I have so much energy.” Needless to say, he’s been on the ketogenic diet ever since. Mental clarity is a priority to me. And if a diet can help me focus more, best believe i’m gonna stick to it. Anyways, if you guys want to hear more in-depth explanations on the benefits of the ketogenic diet, I suggest you check out Tim Ferris’s podcast interview with Dom D’agostino. That’s where I personally first heard about it and started to implement it. Now it’s just become a lifestyle for me. Check out the podcast here. They can get pretty nerdy on the specifics on how everything Continue reading >>

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

It’s almost a universally accepted fact that diets leave you hungry. After all, that rumbling tummy two hours after mealtime (not to mention, strict and time-consuming calorie counting) is the reason most New Year’s resolutions fail by February, right? But Dr. Jacob Wilson and Ryan Lowery, the authors of The Ketogenic Bible, say you don’t need to go hungry or count calories to lose weight. The ketogenic diet, also referred to as “keto,” is a dieting method gaining popularity from people with diabetes to CrossFitters. “The ketogenic diet induces ketosis, which is a state where your body is running primarily off of fat and ketones,” explains Wilson, instead of sugar from carbs. “That can occur through lowering your carbohydrates and having very high fat intake.” Specifically, the ketogenic diet targets about 80 percent of calories from fat, 15 percent from protein and 5 percent from carbohydrates. RELATED: Why You Should Eat More Fat and Less Sugar The Upside of Ketosis While this method may have gained popularity among athletes and other hard-core fitness buffs, they’re far from the only ones who will see benefits from this method. “When you implement a well-formulated proper ketogenic diet, you can see improvement in performance and body composition at the same time,” says Lowery. You’ll look leaner and shed fat, but you won’t feel sapped of energy like when you decrease calories. The bonus is you won’t experience the post-meal crash associated with a higher-carb diet, he says. Lowery also says that for most ketogenic diet newbies, there won’t be a need to count overall calories either. As long as you’re paying attention to your diet and inducing ketosis through high-fat and low-carb consumption, most dieters automatically hit a calorie Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

What Is The Keto Flu Or Low Carb Flu And What To Do About It?

Keto flu symptoms, mitigation and getting over excess carbohydrates Any major dietary or lifestyle change has the potential to cause discomfort or lets face it, even mess you up for a bit. This is sometimes referred to as a ‘flu’. It’s the most common time during which people will quit their dietary or lifestyle shift as many simply feel they are unable to function without significant carbohydrates and snacking throughout day. Here we’ll discuss the major downside to starting a ketogenic diet or a low carb one, and how to minimize the discomfort often accompanying this adaptation period. Like most people you’ve probably spent 20 – 60 years feeding your body a significant amount of carbohydrates and much of them from poorly chosen overly processed sources. Your cells, organs, central nervous system and brain have all adapted to it through hormonal and metabolic responses normally running in the background. Switching fuel sources, like eating less carbs and more fat, is likely to throw your body and brain for a loop. To be clear, the “keto flu” label is a bit of a misnomer. It’s more akin to carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms resulting from a shifting hormonal states and imbalanced electrolyte adjustments that are along for the ride. Regardless, this buzz term is in the general consciousness now so we might as well keep using it for now. Before diving into the details, keep in mind that the following four books should teach you nearly everything you need to know about low carb and ketogenic diets, including how to handle the keto flu. The rest of the relevant science is dispersed amongst hundreds if not thousands of papers only a search away on PubMed. If you want to ask questions about it or be part of our community please visit Ask BreakNutrition. Sympto Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

The Ironman Guide To Ketosis

The Ironman Guide To Ketosis

Written by Megan Roberts, MSc, and Tommy Wood MD, PhD What if there was a way to: Restore the boundless energy of your youth Improve your body composition and mood Eliminate the gas and bloating that plagues your every race Fuel your races without Gatorade and sugary gels AND regularly indulge in bacon, eggs, and butter??? Sounds too good to be true, right? Well, the truth is that all of the above (and more) is achievable by embracing some diet and lifestyle changes. The crux of the secret - the ketogenic diet. Perhaps you’ve heard of the ketogenic diet being touted for its weight loss efficacy. Or maybe you’ve heard it mentioned on Internet forums as the cure-all for everything from migraines to Alzheimer's to the pain in your little toe. But you? You’re an IRONMAN triathlete! You NEED carbohydrates to fuel your races, right??? Unfortunately, following that conventional sports nutrition advice has brought many desperate athletes to their knees, searching for an alternative when their health and training begin to suffer despite eating all those healthy whole grains. This is the first in a series of articles that will introduce you to the ketogenic diet, specifically for the IRONMAN athlete. At the end of this article, you will have the basics to decide whether or not a ketogenic diet might be right for you. What is ketosis? Before answering the big question of how to get into ketosis, let’s define what ketosis actually is. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which you’re predominantly burning fat for fuel. Note that this is not the same as diabetic ketoacidosis, which is characterized by high levels of both ketones and sugar in the blood, particularly in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this case we’re talking about nutritional ketosis, which is a natural metab Continue reading >>

Being Fat Adapted Versus

Being Fat Adapted Versus "in Ketosis" (pt.1/3)

UPDATE!! (9/20/2017) I have a new post that explains how and why the body produces ketones, It will help you understand much better the difference between burning fat and having a fat-based metabolism, versus being "in ketosis." It's very long, but I think it's worth reading if you'd really like to understand this -- and if you want to stop freaking out about your ketone levels. (If you click over to that post and want to read only the section that explains the difference between ketosis and running on fat, scroll way down to where it says Ketogenesis: How and Why Do We Make Ketones? Also: Fat Adaptation versus Ketosis.) Happy reading! If I never hear or read those six words, in that order, ever again, I’ll be one happy individual. Based on what I come across on low-carb forums, blogs, and videos, there is a lot of confusion about the correct use of urine ketone test strips (which I’ll sometimes refer to as ketostix, since “ketone test strips” is a mouthful, even when you’re only reading). So allow me to ‘splain a little bit about how to interpret these things, and what role they should play—if any—in your low-carb life. First and foremost is the most important thing you will read in today’s post. (And it is so important that I will likely repeat it in all the posts to follow in this little series. Plus, you can tell it’s important because it’s red, bold, in italics, and all caps, hehheh.) You can be in ketosis and not lose body fat, and you can lose body fat without being in ketosis. Here is an exhaustive, comprehensive list of everything urine ketone test strips tell you: There is acetoacetate in your urine. That’s it. Nothing more. Nada más. Game over. Finito. The fat lady has sung, and Elvis has left the building. Your worth as a human being Continue reading >>

I Tried The Keto Diet For A Week, And This Is What Happened

I Tried The Keto Diet For A Week, And This Is What Happened

Americans are always finding the “best” way to lose weight, hence the wide variety of diets we have available to us. There’s “raw-til-4,” Paleo, juice cleanses, the blood type diet, cabbage soup diet, and more. Now, another diet, or as people like to call it now, lifestyle, is emerging called keto, which is very comparable to the popular 1970’s Atkins diet. Keto requires you to severely limit your intake of carbs to 25 grams net carbs a day, have a moderate intake of protein, and a high intake of fats. This will set your body to run on ketones instead of glucose. There are so many pros and cons to this diet, and no one can seem to come to a definite conclusion, partly because it hasn’t been studied long enough. As a society, we go through waves of fearing a certain macro nutrient, to all of a sudden praising it. Keto could just be another phase, or maybe it actually provides the health benefits it claims to from simple weight loss to curing cancer. I decided to try it out myself for one week to see what would happen. My goal wasn’t to lose weight, or to reinforce the health claims. I just wanted to experience what it would be like, and what people go through when practicing keto. The Night Before I did my research, calculated my macros, and prepped some meals that I can have. The amount of eggs I have in my fridge right now is ridiculous. I also got avocados, Earth Balance vegan butter, low-carb vegetables, and cheese. My goal is to hit 25 grams carbs, 75 grams protein, and 137 grams fat. I love peanut butter, eggs and cheese for sure, but…yikes. I dragged my boyfriend to do it with me so I’d be encouraged to finish out the week. He was ecstatic for it, though, and kept talking about how much butter and steak he was going to eat. I joked about how I Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

The Top 10 Mistakes Low-carb Athletes Make And 5 Keto Recipes For Active People.

OK, here’s the deal – I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: an extremely high-fat, low-carb ketogenic diet is not for everyone. But since ketones are a preferred fuel for the heart and the diaphragm, and because a state of ketosis can give you extreme focus and cognitive performance during difficult mental tasks, a ketogenic diet can be extremely useful for endurance athletes like triathletes, distance swimmers, cyclists, marathoners, ultra-runners, etc. Problem is, there aren’t a ton of resources out there about how highly active people can actually get into a state of ketosis without… A) chugging coconut oil and MCT oil all day long, which (trust me, I’ve tried) gets boring really, really fast; or B) experiencing some pretty extreme nutrient deficiencies from a ketogenic diet gone wrong – nutrient deficiencies that really get magnified when you combine them with crazy high levels of physical activity. So in this article, author, triathlete, and ketogenic expert extraordinaire Patricia Daly is going to fill you in on how to do things the right way. Patricia just finished writing an amazing book called “Practical Keto Meal Plans For Endurance Athletes: Tips, Tricks And How To’s For Optimizing Performance Using A High Fat, Low Carb Meal Plan“, and she’s a wealth of information on this topic. Take it away, Patricia. ————————————– Maybe the title of this article scares you a little bit… …after all, if there’s so much that can “go wrong” with the ketogenic and low carb lifestyle, is it worth all the effort? Or do you think you will never “get there” and achieve nutritional ketosis because there seem to so many stumbling blocks in your way, like talk about thyroid damage, lack of energy or extreme dietary Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

Low Carb, Paleo, Detox – Is It Worth The Hype?

Low Carb, Paleo, Detox – Is It Worth The Hype?

New year, new me? When the year is about to end, it often feels like we are about to finish a chapter in a book. We are excited for the next chapter and have high expectations in it. We want it to be better than the last one. Luckily, in contrast to reading books, we are the ones who can influence the next chapter tremendously. Do you remember your last year’s resolutions? What did you do in order to achieve them? What hindered you from where you wanted to be? New year, new diet? When it comes to nutrition and weight loss, everyone seems to have the goal to do a little bit better next year. Magazines, TV shows and the internet are full of new fad diets. Don’t we all want to lose weight as quickly as possible? Unfortunately, a lot of approaches are quite extreme and do not work long-term. You might be able to follow a restrictive diet for some days, but not long-term. Eventually, your body will respond and ask for the energy it requires. Be prepared for mood swings, low energy levels and cravings. Let’s have a look at five of the current most popular diets. 1. Restricted diet (Crash diet) There are many diets which promote a weight loss of 10 pounds a week. Cutting off calories strictly does lead to weight loss. But so does having inadequate amount of food available resulting in being malnourished. Our bodies believe it is ‘starving’ when we force it to work with way less calories. All the functions which are not needed for survival are decreased or shut down. Such as, your energy levels, your fertility, sex drive and your brain function. Decline in resting metabolic rates Take for example the participants of The 2009 Biggest Loser television series. Everyone regained almost all of the lost weight. Unfortunately, what they did not regain is their resting metabo Continue reading >>

Keto Os Review

Keto Os Review

Created by Prüvit, Keto OS, which stands for Ketone Operating System, is a “revolutionary drink mix based on a proprietary ketone energy technology. It delivers advanced macro nutritionals and promotes optimized cellular regeneration, energy and longevity.” [1] Also known as the keto diet, KETO OS is a line of supplements that promise to turbocharge your metabolism and send your body into ketosis without resorting to the draconian no-carb, all-fat diet. The History of Ketones Known for centuries, it wasn’t until a hundred years ago that ketones (Beta-hydroxybutyrate) were used to treat seizures in kids with epilepsy. A “neuroprotective effect” was produced, which calms the nervous system. Soon researchers were exploring an expanded use of ketones to help with mental, emotional and cognitive health, according to Prüvit spokesperson Andra “Dr. Andy” Campitelli , a naturopathic doctor. She says ketone use was expanded as a tool to enhance athletic performance. Ketones result when the body burns fat for fuel. [2] Prüvit on Better Business Bureau There are two Prüvit profiles on the Better Business Bureau site, one in Indiana and one in Texas. Both sell Prüvit products, but have no website link. The Texas profile has an F rating, mostly for lack of response to customer complaints about return issues. The Indiana profile has an A rating, but no reviews or complaints, and it’s only been open a year. Neither profile lists the CEO the same as the website. There is no phone contact on either the Prüvit website or the Texas BBB profile, only an “Ask a Question” form that goes via email. The Indiana profile does have a phone number: (812) 631-4282. [3] [4] [5] What Keto OS Does? So Prüvit claims Keto OS supplementation helps shed fat, build a better body Continue reading >>

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