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Is Ketosis Sustainable

Is Keto Sustainable?

Is Keto Sustainable?

I recently had a conversation with a doctor, an eye doctor, who is keto-friendly. During this conversation, he made the statement that keto (the Ketogenic Diet and Lifestyle) is unsustainable. My only response to that was, “We disagree about that.” And I was ready to let it go. Not because I didn’t feel comfortable with the subject matter, but because I didn’t want to get into an argument while he was checking my eyesight. But it got me thinking about that particular line of argument. When someone says, “It’s not sustainable,” what are they really saying? What does “sustainable” really mean? As best as I can tell, based upon the people who ask the question, it means, “Can you be keto for the rest of your life?” Can you, for the rest of your life, eat high-fat, moderate-protein, and very low-carb food? And on the surface, this might seem like a fair question. But it’s not a fair question. It’s a stupid one. First of all, it’s asking if you can predict the future. Can you say, with all certainty that you will stick to the strictest ketogenic definition of food for the remainder of your life? Or will you have to, on occasion, make due with some fat-free cheese? Or some white meat chicken? Or a salad without any fat in it? Sometimes we have to make the best of a bad situation. Sometimes we don’t have a say in what gets served. We always have a choice about whether or not we eat it, though, but that’s another discussion. So it’s a stupid question, because you can’t predict the future. But you can be as keto-prepared as possible. Second, it’s asking if you’ll ever eat non-keto foods. So, let’s pretend that you’re at a restaurant, and you ask all the right questions about the meal you’re ordering: real butter, no sugar, no breading Continue reading >>

How Can I Say Eating Low Carb Is Sustainable? Well, Because It Is.

How Can I Say Eating Low Carb Is Sustainable? Well, Because It Is.

One of the slams one hears or reads about the ketogenic, low carb/high fat (LCHF) diet is that it can't be followed long term and that all diets fail. (That, and 'It will wreck your kidneys' ... 'Your cholesterol is going to go sky high' .... 'You might lose weight but that won't help you if you keel over from a heart attack' ... 'Carbs are required to make glucose so your brain can function properly' ... 'You'll shoot your eye out, kid!') Wait. That last one is about something else altogether.. The idea that eating a low carbohydrate diet won't work because all diets fail, which one might even hear from medical doctors, is maybe the most bothersome. If all diets fail then what's the point of trying ANY diets? Seriously. Let's just revel in the obesity epidemic, turn our healthcare system over to more and more treatment for the horrible side effects of Type II diabetes and call it a day. More to the point, though, a ketogenic, low carb way of eating is imminently sustainable. Personally, as of today, I've been following the program for two years, seven months and ten days. Not a single day, meal or snack off plan. Excuse me, I did eat a sliver of our older son's wedding cake in April of 2014. Other than that, I've remained below 20 carbohydrates per day - usually well below. And I'm not dead yet. I see no reason to ever change. As for my brain suffering from lack of carbohydrate intake, all I can say is that I'm able to string all the words written here together in a somewhat cogent manner. I dare say that my intellect has gotten back to where it was in my youth. I was really clever then. Then things got a bit foggy. Now I'm clever again. That is, I'm clever enough to keep at least myself entertained. But let's take it further. Jacqueline Eberstein, R.N., whom I had the Continue reading >>

Using A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss

Using A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss

Using A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss Weight loss is a billion dollar industry for one major reason, people are not getting sustainable results. If you are looking to lose some stubborn fat and you have stumbled across this article, chances are you have been doing your research. The internet is filled with millions of opinions on how to lose weight and get healthy. With skyrocketing rates of obesity and related health conditions in the US, eating less and exercising more usually just doesn’t cut it. Fortunately, you are in the right place now. Based on the latest research and my experience, I am going to explain to you why you should consider the ketogenic diet for weight loss. I love the ketogenic diet for so many reasons. Not only can it boost your mental and physical performance, but it naturally and safely promotes fat burning as well. Another plus is that following a ketogenic diet, in my opinion, is not as limiting as some other diet strategies. I’m here to tell you that losing weight is possible while still enjoying delicious food! Most people, especially those who have unsuccessfully experimented with a new diet, cringe at the thought of adopting a new way of eating. The way they see it, they have to starve themselves, avoid all their favorite foods, and be satisfied with limited results. To me this is a ridiculous way to live your life and why the ketogenic diet is such a game changer. On a ketogenic diet, you simply reduce carb intake and increase your consumption of healthy fats until your body learns to burn fat for energy over sugar. This metabolic shift is advantageous for the body, your metabolism, your hormones, and all while keeping you full naturally. Because fats are such an efficient fuel source, you get hungry less often, you cut cravings, and Continue reading >>

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

7 Days On The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is essentially the Atkins diet of the 2010s. Super popular, almost impossible to maintain long-term, and wildly effective for weight loss (per anecdotal reports as well as scientific research). What is the ketogenic diet? Your goal on a “keto” diet is to get at least 70% of calories from fat, no more than 25% of calories from protein and only 5-10% from carbohydrate. For most people, that means restricting your carb intake to below 50 grams a day. The diet first started as a treatment to decrease seizures in children with uncontrolled epilepsy. The body and brain is forced to get energy from fat instead of carbs, which produces ketones in our body that then fuel our cells. Reports as far back as the 1920’s show that when epileptic children switched to a strict all-fat diet, their brain adapted its fuel source and less seizures occurred. If the brain of someone with epilepsy could benefit from running off of ketones, could your average Joe also get some kind of benefit? Of course researchers had this same question and since the 1960’s there has been evidence that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss and improving insulin resistance. Emerging data also suggests a neurological advantage as well as an anti-cancer effect. Please note, I’m saying evidence exists. That doesn’t mean the verdict is in and that doesn’t mean that the ketogenic diet won’t have negative effects elsewhere. What do you eat? It’s easier to start with what you DON’T eat. No bread, fruit, starchy vegetables (like potatoes or corn), cookies, candy, ice cream, pizza, sandwiches, rice, quinoa, cereal, oatmeal, waffles, smoothies, beer, protein bars… basically, most food is off limits. That leaves us with full fat dairy (cheese, plain yogurt, butter), greens Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Weight Loss?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Weight Loss?

Share it: If you’ve been contemplating various weight-loss strategies, you may have run across the ketogenic diet. This dietary strategy, which is often used in a clinical setting to help improve seizure control in children with epilepsy, is picking up steam as an effective treatment for weight loss. But is it right for you? We turned to the experts to find out more. WHAT IS IT? The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis, where fat is burned for fuel instead of carbohydrate. (This isn’t to be confused with ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition typically caused by a lack of insulin in the body.) According to Dominic D’Agostino, a researcher at the University of South Florida who specializes in ketogenic diets, “The ‘classic ketogenic diet’ used originally for the management of drug-resistance seizures is a 4:1 ratio of fats to protein and carbohydrates.” That equates to about 80–90% fat, 5–15% protein and 5–10% carbohydrates. For weight loss, he says, this diet is typically modified “to allow a more liberal consumption of protein” (20–30%) with the same carbohydrate restriction. IS IT FOR YOU? Advocates of the ketogenic diet are quick to point out many of the benefits this diet can have for those looking to lose weight. “Rapid weight loss and a decrease in hunger are the most common and evident benefits,” says Kristen Mancinelli, MS, RD, author of “The Ketogenic Diet: A Scientifically Proven Approach to Fast, Healthy Weight Loss.” D’Agostino references promising studies that have been shown to “lower blood glucose levels, increase sensitivity to insulin, decrease inflammation and reduce triglyceride levels while raising HDL cholesterol.” READ MORE > 21 DIETIT Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Gives Results, But Is It Safe And Sustainable?

Ketogenic Diet Gives Results, But Is It Safe And Sustainable?

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as "keto" blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but that Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets May Help You Live Longer And Improve Your Memory, But There's A Catch

Ketogenic Diets May Help You Live Longer And Improve Your Memory, But There's A Catch

The ketogenic diet has emerged as one of the trendiest weight-loss strategies around. The diet, which restricts your carbohydrate and protein intakes in favor of fattier foods like eggs and fish, is crafted to induce ketosis, a metabolic process when, in lieu of available glucose, your body burns stored fats. The thought is that by focusing your diet on those stored fats instead of glucose-heavy foods, your body will burn the fat, and you'll reap a number of benefits, including enhanced immunities, better mental and physical performance, lower insulin, and a more controllable appetite. However, because of its significant restrictions on what you can and can't eat, a number of concerns have been raised about a ketogenic diet's feasibility and safety. Some have even labeled them as completely useless. "Extreme diets such as the ketogenic diet have no therapeutic or practical use for people without neurodegenerative disorders such as epilepsy,” Alan Aragon, M.S., a Men's Health nutrition advisor, told us in August. "I do love and advocate healthy fats but don't think a true keto diet is sustainable—or fun—for many people," Libby Babbet, a personal trainer on Australia's The Biggest Loser, told the Sydney Morning Herald. Helen Truby, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Nutrition, Dietetics & Food at Monash University, was just as cautious in her assessment of the trend diet. Rob Gronkowski's Diet: This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. End of dialog window. "Should people start ketogenic diets? Answer: not unless there is a medical indication to do so and under the guidance of an accredited practicing dietitian who can ensure nutritional adequacy," she told the Herald. Mice studies have reportedly arrived at re Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketosis In Perspective: Thinking Twice About The Keto Diet Fad

Ketosis In Perspective: Thinking Twice About The Keto Diet Fad

Fad diets come in cycles, fluctuating to match popular prevailing attitudes toward nutrition. Fear of dietary fat spurred the creation of dozens of “fat free” processed snacks, but it wasn’t long before carbohydrates took center stage as dietary villains. Fast on the heels of the low-carb trend, the media declared fat to be vindicated and put butter back on the menu. Table of contents What is Ketosis? As if this game of nutritional ping pong wasn’t already enough to make your head spin, each major shift in dietary advice has spawned several conflicting programs and protocols. From Atkins and Paleo to “high-carb, low-fat” and 80/10/10, it seems as though everyone is claiming to hold the key to weight loss, longevity and freedom from every imaginable disease. The latest of these fads piggybacks on the removal of the “bad guy” label from dietary fat and takes the idea of low-carb diets to an extreme level. Known as the ketogenic, or “keto,” diet, it’s a dietary pattern based on nearly eliminating carbohydrates and increasing dietary fat to put the body in a state known as ketosis. Proponents of “going keto” claim it improves heart health, reduces problems associated with diabetes, gives you more energy and is preferable to low-fat diets for weight loss. If such success stories have made you wonder whether a ketogenic diet is worth trying, it’s important to note the known side effects, documented adverse reactions and potential risks of undertaking such a restrictive regimen. What is Ketosis? In a normal state, your body uses glucose obtained from carbohydrates to make energy. When carbohydrates are broken down, the resulting simple sugar can be used as a convenient fuel source. Extra glucose is stored in your liver and muscles as glycogen and is Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis The Answer To Fat Loss, Ibs And Sugar Fatigue?

Is Ketosis The Answer To Fat Loss, Ibs And Sugar Fatigue?

We’re all looking for that one diet plan which actually works. Whether it’s losing weight, feeling healthier or having more energy, the diet industry had made billions from people looking for a magic pill. Go on Instagram and it’s full of people claiming that chowing down on chocolate proats (protein oats) or bone broth is the main reason that they’re a size 6 bikini model. Obviously, that’s bunkum but it can be tempting to buy into these solutions – particularly if you are struggling with intolerances, inflammation or you’re generally feeling run down. It’s not as easy as simply looking to slim down. Enter: keto. What is keto? A keto diet is basically a low-carb, no-sugar plan that pushes the body to produce ketones in the liver which can be used as energy. In other words, you’re getting your body to make its own energy rather than relying on fat-producing foods. And that means keeping the blood sugar balanced, maintaining regular energy levels, and more effectively burning fat. I keep meeting women who have turned to ketosis – a sort of Paleo diet – in a bid to feel better, look better and train better. Now, as a plant-based eater, I’m always sceptical about these diets which rely on ‘caveman’ eating patterns. I mean…we’ve evolved a bit since the stone age. We live longer, we’re probably fitter, we know more about nutrition. So why bother? Lucy Denver is a CrossFit PT, nutrition expert and Reebok ambassador – and a keto devotee. I spent a weekend training with Lucy at Be:FIT Weekender and I can tell you, she’s about as fit and lean as it’s possible to be. In fact, she recently completed the Ragner Relay (170 miles of running split between 10 people, with each person running three times within 24 hours) as part of the Team Reebok Continue reading >>

My Own Health V The Planet? Can A Ketogenic-diet Be Sustainable, Both For Me & For Future Generations?

My Own Health V The Planet? Can A Ketogenic-diet Be Sustainable, Both For Me & For Future Generations?

Naturally this diet is having a considerable impact on my waistline! There are other impacts to be considered however, such as the potential environmental-impact that my food-choices may be having. I must admit that this has been nagging at my conscience a little. Meat and dairy have an astronomically high environmental-footprint. Beef – 16kg of CO²e/kg, lamb 17kg CO²e/kg & butter 17.6kg CO²e/kg… Need I go on? Compare this to the humble carrot at circa 0.05kg CO²e/kg and I begin to feel a little uncomfortable… This requires a lot more thought and research than I’ve yet had time to undertake. But is my diet so bad for the world that I can conscience continuing it? Are the polar-ice-caps going to melt any faster, simply because I’ve started to eat bacon for breakfast in place of muesli…? This blog can’t go into the full detail of this conundrum; there isn’t sufficient space & my small audience would rapidly dwindle if I switched tack & went off at a tangent. The below details a few thoughts I’ve been having as a starter for ten! Hopefully this will introduce a few positives into the equation & guide the thought-process to pastures greener. 1. Calories v Volume My calorific-intake on a fat-based metabolism remains the same as that of a glucose-fuelled diet (yet my weight is decreasing). Calories remain unchanged, but the volume of food I eat has more than halved! Fat is a far more efficient fuel-source than any other. The calorific-density of fat is 9 calories per gram v 4 calories from carbohydrate. The high levels of saturated fat in a ketogenic diet mean that you feel full on a vastly reduced volume of food (I estimate that my portion-size has literally halved in comparison to when I was eating glucose). I’m therefore eating less. 2. Decreased Vo Continue reading >>

Tips On How To Make Keto Sustainable

Tips On How To Make Keto Sustainable

1,462 views How can you make the transition to a low-carb or keto diet as smooth as possible? Kristie Sullivan should know, since she has successfully been on the diet for four years. In this interview she shares her best tips and tricks, ranging from eating out at restaurants to quick dishes to make when you have no time. Watch a part of the interview above (transcript). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership: Tips on how to make keto sustainable – Kristie Sullivan, PhD Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service. Ketosis More Keto for beginners Continue reading >>

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Long Term Very Low Carb And Ketogenic Diets = Bad News

Via Spanish Caravan, a frequent commenter with let’s just say a “medical background.” ~~~ Physiological Insulin Resistatnce (PIR) results from glucose deficiency the same way mucin deficiency induces dry eyes, nostrils, colon and anemia like symptoms. They’re both ways of preserving glucose for your brain. When you VLC, your muscles become insulin resistant to preserve your glucose for the brain. So while your muscles are running on fatty acids, they become insulin resistant. This leaves glucose for your brain but the net result is your BG going up as you’re “physiologically” insulin resistant. There doesn’t really seem to a problem with this state, as there is with mucin deficiency; it’s not known to induce diabetes or make prediabetics diabetic. At least not according to those who advocate VLCing. I have a feeling however, that this is a disease-prone state. The effects of low carbohydrate diets on insulin sensitivity depend on what is used to replace the dietary carbohydrate, and the nature of the subjects studied. Dietary carbohydrates may affect insulin action, at least in part, via alterations in plasma free fatty acids. In normal subjects a high-carbohydrate/low-GI breakfast meal reduced free fatty acids by reducing the undershoot of plasma glucose, whereas low-carbohydrate breakfasts increased postprandial free fatty acids. Why is it disease-prone? Because high serum free fatty acids are implicated in various disease states, especially immune related (and also diabetes in some cases). High serum FFA and very low trigs that we see among those who VLC are associated with nascent autoimmunity, especially rheumatic autoimmunity. See: Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders. We’re talking about triglycer Continue reading >>

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Can Eating Fat Help You Lose Weight? Let’s Look At The Ketogenic Diet.

Fat makes your meals more palatable and helps you feel full, so it’s no wonder the high-fat ketogenic diet is increasing in popularity. The diet has been trending for the past three years, as “keto” blogs and cookbooks continue to pop up and build an impressive fan base. This diet has been used under close supervision by physicians and dietitians since the 1920s for treating epilepsy and has shown promise in managing brain cancer. But is it useful and healthy as a strategy for weight loss? First, the basics: On the ketogenic diet, at least 70 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Five to 10 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates (20 to 50 grams a day). The rest, up to 25 percent of your daily energy, comes from protein. By contrast, the healthy diet recommended by the Institute of Medicine is 45 to 65 percent carbs, 20 to 35 percent fat and 10 to 35 percent protein. The ketogenic diet’s low-carb target can be met only by avoiding grains, dairy products, fruit, and legumes such as chickpeas and lentils. Starchy vegetables such as sweet potatoes and squash are out, and even amounts of lower-carb vegetables are limited. So what’s left to eat? Typically, eggs cooked in butter for breakfast; for lunch and dinner, meat, chicken or fish with salad or green vegetables and plenty of oily dressing. Sorry folks, no alcohol on this diet. Even red wine is out. The ketogenic diet gets its name from a process called ketosis. Ketosis happens when your body doesn’t have enough energy from glucose (carbohydrates), so it adapts by using stored fat for energy. The result? Weight loss. Does the ketogenic diet lead to faster or more sustainable weight loss than other diets? The research to date suggests that initial weight loss on the keto diet is impressive but Continue reading >>

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