diabetestalk.net

Is Ketosis Similar To Paleo?

The Best And Worst Diets 2016: Three Experts Share Their Verdicts

The Best And Worst Diets 2016: Three Experts Share Their Verdicts

Look out! Doctors caution against following celebrities like Pete Evan for health advice. 10 things you shouldn't be eating (and 10 you should) Still carrying the post-holiday food-baby? You're not alone. Diet Googling peaks in the first few months of the year when thousands of Australians turn to the internet in search of a diet that will shed kilos with minimal effort. Separating science from fiction is tricky when it comes to diets (remember the "fat melting" grapefruit diet?). We asked three experts, Aloysa Hourigan, of Nutrition Australia, nutritionist Dr Joanna McMillan, and Clare Collins, Professor in Nutrition and Dietetics at the Newcastle School of Health Sciences, to voice their verdicts on the top 10 most Googled diets in Australia. Detox: Not a diet that promotes good habits. What is it? Promotes a diet of foods closerto that of ancient ancestors. Bannedfoods include wheat, dairy, vegetable oil,grains, sugar, legumes, preservatives and processed food. Included is grass-fed meat, plant foods, herbs and spices, seafood, nuts, seeds, berries, nut milks and fermented drinks such as kefirand ghee or coconut oil. Aloysa Hourigan says: While it encourages an increased vegetable intake and avoids ultra-processed food high in salt, sugar and fat, and low in nutrients, the diet omits or severely restricts several food groups which provide key nutrients such as wholegrains, fruit, legumes and starchy vegetables.It encourages a lot of coconut oil and current research does not support the use of coconut oil as the preferred source of fat. It's also expensive, so not so good from a food sustainability perspective. Professor Clare Collins says: The fatty acid content of meat today is not like that of wild animals in paleo times. High red meat intakes increase risk for bo Continue reading >>

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

DIETARY SHOWDOWN! PALEO VS. KETO VS. ATKINS! Hey there Fit Farmers! As you know, our approach to nutrition and eating here on the farm is all about real food for the real world. Most dieting scenarios end in disaster due to the inability to keep up the restrictive measure of calories or carbs or some other ingredient involved, which is why our approach differs from most most of the mainstream nutritional plans and lifestyles. But what if your specific body chemistry actually responds really well to a particular nutritional plan? Today we’re going to talk specifically about Keto, Atkins and Paleo. Often lumped together under the heading of “low carb fad diets”, these eating methodologies actually have very significant differences. Is one superior? Is one right for your body chemistry? Can they be used as short term “boost measures” to kickstart better health, rest and weight loss? In today’s post we’ll take a deeper dive into each of these diet types and see if we can come up with some answers, so hang on tight! THE PALEO DIET The name of this diet is taken from the Paleolithic period of human development, in which cavemen first began to use stone tools and sharpened points to hunt with, and also began to control and use fire. Regardless of your views on history and anthropology, the theme of the diet is to only eat what foods were available to these ‘Paleolithic peoples’ as they roamed about hunting and gathering — primarily meat, eggs, fish, and fresh fruits and vegetables. This is done in the belief that these are the food sources that humans are best adapted to rather than the agricultural products and processed foods that came much later in our evolutionary span. Critics point out that (if you buy into the historical basis here) human digestive a Continue reading >>

The Difference Between The Ketogenic Diet Vs. The Paleo Diet

The Difference Between The Ketogenic Diet Vs. The Paleo Diet

If you are wondering what the difference is between the paleo diet and the keto diet, this post helps to break it down so you can make the right choice for your body. As with any new diet regimen, be sure to speak with your doctor. We’re all looking for ways to eat well and to eat within a budget, too. Two diets—one of them created as a medical response to a disease, the other as a claim to ancient roots of humans—have gained traction in any discussions about nutrition and eating. Let’s take a closer look at them. Ketogenic diets are the eating plans that many people with epilepsy use to help try to reduce the frequency or severity of seizures. The diets help to starve the body of unnecessary carbs, forcing the liver to generate something called ketos, which are released into the bloodstream instead of sugars. Paleo adherents, on the other hand, claim to be eating the same things that our ancient ancestors ate around cave fires (and that they killed themselves). While the diets bear some similarities to one another, they are also different in key ways. This graphic explains it. image credit: Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

I was in my 20s when I started suffering from severe fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. I was 300 pounds, sick constantly, and almost had to drop out of grad school because I couldn’t concentrate. Back then, I thought my inability to think clearly and perform at high levels was some sort of moral failing. I would beat myself up. I would work harder and stay up later, trying to catch up with my peers. I tried every diet imaginable, including raw vegan and years of falling off the low-fat bandwagon. I hit the treadmill for hours every day. Nothing worked. So I took matters into my own hands. The Bulletproof Diet was born after a decade of working with some of the world’s top health and nutrition researchers. Over a span of about 15 years, I devoured thousands of research papers and books on human nutrition. I used my body as a testing ground to determine what worked best for my biology. The result is a diet that has helped thousands of people lose fat and gain the energy and clarity they thought they’d lost forever. So, what differentiates the Bulletproof Diet from other low-carb diets? Read on to find out. For an in-depth plan on how to boost energy and increase brain function in just two weeks, get your copy of Head Strong. Bulletproof vs. Paleo: The Big Picture If you were to map out the most popular diets, you’d see a vast spectrum of practices and plans ranging from low-fat vegan to high-fat, low-carb (HFLC). This deliciously fatty end of the spectrum is where the Bulletproof Diet and the Primal, Paleo, and Atkins diets would lie. The Paleo diet eliminates processed foods and focuses on what our paleolithic ancestors ate – mostly meat, plants, nuts, and seeds. The Bulletproof Diet is similar but designed to maximize your willpower by reducing cravings and m Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs Keto Vs Atkins – What’s The Difference?

Paleo Vs Keto Vs Atkins – What’s The Difference?

“ So many diets, so little time but the options are still on the table with the paleo, keto and Atkins diets taking the forefront and you got to choose one. Or possibly tread carefully and skinny dip on various diets all at once. Still, the paleo, Atkins and ketogenic diets carve a fork on the road and picking the right path isn’t exactly something you would want to rush into. Take the time to get to know the diets and read on to find out their differences so you can start your health quest confidently and comfortably. If you take a good look at all the options for dieters these days, you’re bound to be surprised and a little confused. After all, there are so many different diets out there and, every week we seem to hear about another one “guaranteed” to work. And, during this research, it becomes pretty clear that a lot of people do battle to find something that really works for them. Now, you could see this as a lack of perseverance, or perhaps poor execution on the part of the dieters. But that cannot possibly be the case every single time. You also have to look at the diet itself – some are ridiculous, others seem to make sense but have not been based on proven principles. Some, like the ketogenic, paleo and Atkins diet have been very successful and are grounded in sound scientific research. Now, if you are looking at those three in particular, it is hard to tell which is most popular. Just have a look on social media for evidence of how many people follow each of these diets. And, considering that each of the diets is so popular, you might be under the impression that any of them would do for you. And, it’s true, following one of these three diets should help you improve your health and start getting the results you have hoped for. You just need to be Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide To The Keto Diet

The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide To The Keto Diet

The keto diet (also known as the ketogenic diet) is well known for being low in carbohydrates. Keto is a state in which the body produces ketones in the liver, which are then used for energy. The keto diet can also be known as a low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), or any diet that limits carbohydrates to a low level (typically lower than 30 grams of carbs). What Is The Keto Diet? What Happens To My Body during Keto? What Do I Eat? What Are The Benefits of The Keto Diet? Physical Performance during The Keto Diet Are There Dangers to The Keto Diet? When you’re on the keto diet, because it’s lower in carbohydrates, most of your calories come from fats and protein to fuel the body. When you ingest carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into the simplest molecule possible, glucose. This molecule forces your body to produce insulin. Insulin transports carbs across membranes to either be used directly as energy or to be stored for later use (either in fat or muscle/liver glycogen). Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert into and use for energy at any given time. Glucose will be the first thing chosen to use for an energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream, to transport it around your body, and to store it where necessary. When your body is using glycogen or glucose as its main energy source, your body will not need to burn fat. It’s therefore more likely that your body will store fat so it can be used at a later point in time when your energy (glycogen) levels are low. So, when you’re on a higher carbohydrate diet, your body will use glycogen as its main energy source. However, when you lower your carb intake, your body is pushed into ketosis. Keto is a natural process which we rely on when our food intake i Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto and Paleo are two of the most popular diets of the 21st century. But what’s the difference between them? Which one will help you lose weight? Which one will help you heal your health? A Quick Summary of The Differences Between Keto And Paleo: Focus on Ketone Levels: A Keto diet focuses on raising your body’s ketone levels by altering your food choices so you enter a metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. A Paleo diet doesn’t pay attention to ketone levels. Focus on Food Quality: A Paleo diet focuses strongly on choosing whole foods that are nutrient-dense, high-quality, and free from toxins. A healthy Keto diet should also include high quality food, but this isn’t the emphasis. Amount of Carbs: A Keto diet has a very low carbohydrate intake. While a Paleo diet is certainly lower in carbs than many other diets out there, it typically still has a higher carb intake than a Keto diet. Amount of Fat: A Keto diet puts far greater emphasis on increasing your fat intake than a Paleo diet. Although Paleo does encourage eating healthy fats, it’s not typically as high fat as a Keto diet. This is a very brief explanation of the differences between Keto and Paleo, so please keep reading to discover more about both diets. Want to figure out which diet is best for you? We’ll cover that below… The 4 Main Differences Between A Keto And Paleo Diet: Here’s a more detailed breakdown of the key differences between Keto and Paleo: Keto vs Paleo – Difference #1 – A Keto diet focuses on raising your ketone levels. The Keto diet has one main aim: raising your ketone levels so you reach nutritional ketosis. If you’re new to all this, then ketosis might be a bit confusing. So let me explain… What are ketones? Ketones (or ketone bodies) are naturally produced by y Continue reading >>

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

“There are a lot of similarities between Paleolithic (Paleo) and ketogenic diets (KD), particularly when compared to the now discredited ‘Standard American’ low fat, high carbohydrate diet. As a result, people may reasonably assume that all low carb diets are pretty much equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth, and the resultant confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. The similarities between Paleo and keto cluster around what they exclude: all grains and grain products (refined and unrefined), peas and beans, and refined sugars. In addition, the paleo diet excludes all dairy (milk, cream, and cheese), whereas the ketogenic diet allows butter, full fat cream and natural cheeses. The differences between the Paleo diet and KD are many, including: Range of foods allowed Recommended amounts of protein Amounts and sources of carbohydrates allowed or recommended Type, quality, and quantity of science supporting diet safety and efficacy Most importantly, the source and consistency of fuel to supply brain energy needs – specifically the availability of ketones at adequate levels to replace glucose as the brain’s primary fuel” “This diagram points out the similarities between ketogenic and Paleo diets, especially when compared to the now discredited low fat diets of the past. But clearly the Paleo and well-formulated ketogenic diets nonetheless are different, with little overlap in their respective compositions. Thus the major metabolic difference between Paleo and KD is encompassed in the phrase ‘nutritional ketosis’. By definition, a ‘ketogenic diet’ allows your body to be in nutritional keto Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Paleo, Atkins, Whole30, Mediterranean Diet & More

Keto Vs Paleo, Atkins, Whole30, Mediterranean Diet & More

Which Diet Is Best For You? There are literally thousands of diets to choose from, because in one-way or another, nearly everyone has struggled with weight loss, malnutrition, or unexpected changes to their body. Within these many options, some are better for losing weight, while others are meant for gaining weight. There are some meant to help with cholesterol, and even a handful to help get rid of those last unwanted pounds when another diet plateaus. Generally speaking, a diet works best when the dieter is well educated on the meal plan and has a scheduled routine they can follow within their lifestyle. Let’s first discuss the basics of the ketogenic diet and then we’ll compare it to other top diets. What Is The Ketogenic Diet? In what began as a treatment for epilepsy, the ketogenic diet quickly uncovered many other uses for medical professionals to explore. Essentially, it involves lowering one’s carbohydrate intake while upping fat intake. This allows for the body to burn fat as fuel, instead of relying on carbs as fuel. The fats on the diet come from avocados, coconuts, Brazil nuts, seeds, oily fish, and virgin olive oil, but can also come in the form of grass-fed butter, such as within bulletproof coffee. After a few days, the diet causes fat deposits in the body to breakdown for fuel, which means the body has moved into a state of ketosis where it begins to burn off ketones. Ironically, this is similar to what happens after a week of juicing. There is promising research for those in the diet trying to manage diabetes, metabolic health, body composition change or weight loss, but a medical professional should be consulted as ketoacidosis could drastically harm those with type 1 diabetes. Keto vs. Atkins At first, many will think that the ketogenic diet sou Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Versus Paleo

Ketogenic Diet Versus Paleo

Taking action requires time and effort. The more choices you have, the more time and effort goes into making a decision. This compulsive desire of making the right choice brought you here to understand the difference between “Ketogenic diet” and “Paleo diet”. Let's have a look at it... To fully understand Keto and Paleo diets, one must take a step back and look at the dieting issue from a wider angle. I am sure at some point in your life you bought a pair of running shoes. You made your choice among various brands and, in order to do that, you had to get informed about shoes. I am sure you are no shoe expert but, for the very fact you bought at least one pair of running shoes, you are qualified to answer this question: Which is the difference between Nike and Adidas running shoes? Before you continue reading, take a moment to think about that… really, what’s the difference? Semantics. Unless you are a Brand Advocate or a running fanatic, those shoes both serve the same purpose and you’ll hardly find good reasons to explain why one is better than the other, or how they differ significantly. When you are running, you are looking for shoes that are comfortable, protect your feet, allow you wearing them for a prolonged time with no harm for your toes and heels. It is hard to argue that both Nike and Adidas don't do an excellent job at this. You will have a hard time finding a meaningful difference until you change the scope of your search. If the shoes have to match your bright yellow running outfit… then Nike might have a better chance. You see? ...it is not anymore about just running. While running was the master-purpose, there is a variety of secondary criteria we subconsciously use for making decisions. Those criteria are what, in the end of the story, d Continue reading >>

Autism And The Ketogenic Diet - Why It Can Affect Autistic Symptoms

Autism And The Ketogenic Diet - Why It Can Affect Autistic Symptoms

If you’ve been following our series of things you can do to improve your child’s autistic symptoms at home, then you may have read our article on the Paleo Diet last week. If so, I would recommend checking that diet style out first. Often times, it works well for children with autism and is easier to pull off than the ketogenic diet is, which we’ll be discussing in this article. If you want all the articles from this series in a nicely designed eBook, simply click here and enter your email address. We’ll send it to you right away. What is the Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet is a diet that is low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. This is similar to the paleo diet but differs in how low you need to keep the carbs and how high to keep the fat. A ketogenic diet starves the body of glucose (what carbohydrates turn into in the body and what most humans run off of), to the point that the body starts breaking down fat into ketones. These ketones can be used to run the body like glucose was doing. When people are running on ketones, they are in a state called ketosis. The thing about the Ketogenic diet is that you have to keep your fat very high and typically monitor your blood ketone levels. Like always, I recommend working with a doctor before implementing anything you read on the internet. Isn’t Fat Bad? So this is a very common concern and is an area where there is a lot of confusion around. The first thing to understand is that there are six different types of fats, three of which are good and three of which should be avoided. The Good Fats Monounsaturated Fats This type of fat is most commonly found in avocados and nuts, like almonds or walnuts. Olive oil is another common source of monounsaturated fats. They’ve been shown to raise good cholesterol while Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Keto & Low-carb Diets

The Difference Between Keto & Low-carb Diets

By Myprotein Writer | Shaun Chapman The Ketogenic Diet or – Keto Diet – limits carbohydrate intake to around 50g per day or 5% energy intake – whereas a low-carb diet has no definition. Personal perceptions of low carb may be completely different to another person’s. In fact, on a ketogenic diet, the macronutrient content would be similar to like 5% carbs, 15% protein and 80% fat. This is according what we are currently giving people for a research study we are running at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge. This is the key difference between going keto and low carb, as this very limited amount of carbohydrate depletes the body and brain of glucose. This is where “keto-adaption” takes place and the body shifts away from carbohydrate metabolism and towards predominantly fat metabolism both at rest and during exercise. However, the central nervous system and brain cannot do this as fatty acids cannot cross the blood-brain barrier and therefore the increase of blood ketones (b-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone) reaches concentrations of 2mmol/l or more. This is why for the first few days on the diet you may feel tired, lethargic and lacking concentration. Ketosis & Ketones Ketone bodies are a major source of energy during periods of fasting or severe carbohydrate restriction (<50g) per day and are produced mainly in the liver. Originally thought of as just a metabolite; ketones may serve an important role linked with the increase of particular enzymes regulating endurance training adaptations. In addition, ketones may even play a role in influencing food intake control by affecting specific parts of the brain that regulate this (the hypothalamus) as well as the way they interact with hunger regulating hormones such as ghrelin. A carbohydrate intake grea Continue reading >>

What Are Core Differences Between The Paleo, Keto And Bulletproof Diets?

What Are Core Differences Between The Paleo, Keto And Bulletproof Diets?

0 As it is January and it’s the start of a new Year- I’ve seen many people start new diets or ways of eating. Because I’ve been eating Paleo for over 6 years, and now have adopted eating Keto with aspects of Bulletproof- I thought I’d share what I’ve learned if you are considering making a lifestyle change or just want to shed some pounds. I would like to stress that this is a lifestyle choice- when you start digging into the “why” behind eating Paleo and keto, you realize that the modern diet is full of crap that is terrible for you. At all costs you should avoid grains and processed foods! This doesn’t mean that you can’t occasionally eat these foods (trust me, I fall off the bandwagon sometimes), but you will feel much better when you adopt this style of eating as a lifestyle versus a short term “diet”. I eat Keto about 80% of the diet and then Paleo on the weekends, etc or when I am craving a little sugar or carbs. Because I can’t control myself around sugar it is best for me to eat a diet that eliminates it (Keto) because I have a hard time eating it in moderation. Paleo, at a Glance: Based on the idea of eating how our ancestors ate. The core idea behind eating Paleo is that our bodies have not adapted to eat our current grain based diet and that we are meant to subsist mainly on (grassfed/organic) meat, fats, veggies and some fruits/starches in moderation. There is a big emphasis on quality of what you are putting in your body. There is a ton of genetically modified and processed crap in the modern diet and the principles of Paleo (and Bulletproof) stress eliminating these foods. Research also suggests that the grains in today’s modern diet are so highly processed they do way more harm than any good, and that a lot of today’s modern di Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Keto: Whats The Difference?

Paleo Vs. Keto: Whats The Difference?

People may assume all low carb diets are equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. This is far from the truth, and the resulting confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. There are a lot of similarities between Paleolithic (Paleo) and ketogenic diets (KD), particularly when compared to the now discredited Standard American low fat, high carbohydrate diet. As a result, people may reasonably assume that all low carb diets are pretty much equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth, and the resulting confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. The similarities between Paleo and keto cluster around what they exclude: all grains and grain products (refined and unrefined), peas and beans, and refined sugars. In addition, the paleo diet excludes all dairy (milk, cream, and cheese), whereas the ketogenic diet allows butter, full fat cream and natural cheeses. The differences between the Paleo diet and KD are many, including: Amounts and sources of carbohydrates allowed or recommended Type, quality, and quantity of science supporting diet safety and efficacy Most importantly, the source and consistency of fuel to supply brain energy needs specifically the availability of ketones at adequate levels to replace glucose as the brains primary fuel Natural meats, poultry, fish (including farmed sources) Full-fat dairy (cheese, butter, ghee, Greek yogurt, cream including ice cream) High sugar fruit (orange, banana, apple, cherry, grape, peach, pear, pineapple) Low sugar fruit (berries, melon, tomato, avocado, ol Continue reading >>

More in ketosis