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Is Ketosis Similar To Paleo?

What’s The Difference Between “keto” And Whole 30?

What’s The Difference Between “keto” And Whole 30?

It’s that time of year again. That time, which comes 3 times a year for us at Rocket CrossFit, when dozens of us will band together for a Nutritional Challenge. We used to always do a Whole 30 Challenge, but for the last year, we’ve had several members – Brady and I included – do a Low-Carb, High-Fat plan instead, which is commonly called “keto.” In fact, since doing my first keto challenge 9 months ago, I’ve not gone back. I take vacations off, but other than that, I’ve felt so good, and found it so easy, that I’ve not stopped. But, what is the difference between Whole 30 (and “paleo”) and a ketogenic diet? Carbs. Carbs are the difference. Which translates also into: Sugar. Sugar is the difference. So, as we start this next Rocket Nutritional Challenge, let’s first lay out a few ground rules, and also explore the difference between Whole 30 and Keto, so that you can make an informed decision about what feels best for you, at this moment in time, for your body. (And, not to complicate things, but you can do both. That’s how I did my first round of keto.) KNOW WHY YOU ARE DOING THIS IN THE FIRST PLACE I will never advocate a strict plan of either nutrition or exercise unless you know why you are doing it and it is good for you both physically and emotionally. I will ask “why” until we get to the kernel. Are you doing it to lose weight? Why do you want to lose weight? If it is because someone called you fat, or you don’t fit into society’s little plan for us, or you think that being thinner will make you happier, I’ll ask “why” again. Why do you believe that? Is it based on facts and opinions of someone who has both knowledge and the right to tell you what to do with your body? (Hint, you’re the only person who has that right.) Ar Continue reading >>

The Difference Between The Ketogenic Diet Vs. The Paleo Diet

The Difference Between The Ketogenic Diet Vs. The Paleo Diet

If you are wondering what the difference is between the paleo diet and the keto diet, this post helps to break it down so you can make the right choice for your body. As with any new diet regimen, be sure to speak with your doctor. We’re all looking for ways to eat well and to eat within a budget, too. Two diets—one of them created as a medical response to a disease, the other as a claim to ancient roots of humans—have gained traction in any discussions about nutrition and eating. Let’s take a closer look at them. Ketogenic diets are the eating plans that many people with epilepsy use to help try to reduce the frequency or severity of seizures. The diets help to starve the body of unnecessary carbs, forcing the liver to generate something called ketos, which are released into the bloodstream instead of sugars. Paleo adherents, on the other hand, claim to be eating the same things that our ancient ancestors ate around cave fires (and that they killed themselves). While the diets bear some similarities to one another, they are also different in key ways. This graphic explains it. image credit: Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Lifestyle And Diet?

What Is The Ketogenic Lifestyle And Diet?

What is the Ketogenic Lifestyle and Diet? Similar to Paleo, Keto is a lifestyle change. Many following the Keto diet adopt a ketogenic lifestyle and intend to adopt long-term habits of reduced carb and sugar intake. It is a high fat and low carb diet meant to reduce sugar spikes and crashes and to transition your energy use from glucose (sugar) to dietary fat through Ketosis. People tend to feel more satisfied when they eat fats, so you shouldnt feel restricted with keto foods. The lifestyle is consistently making food choices that will help you maintain higher energy levels and performance. Wait eat more fat to get skinny and feel more energized? Yup! The basic tenet of this diet is that it changes the type of energy you burn. Glucose is the main source of energy in humans and many other organisms including bacteria through the metabolic pathway glycolysis . If we feed ourselves with plenty of glucose, our bodies wont need to reach into energy stores (stored fat) to fuel us. In a typical American diet, we eat lots of sugars and starches that are quickly turned into glucose and then used for energy. That means we have plenty of glucose to fuel our daily bodily functions and typically have some leftovers. Any glucose that isnt burned turns into adipose tissue or fat. Unfortunately, for many of us in the western world, we eat more than we need and end up with leftover energy, often found in the form of love handles. The focus of the ketogenic diet is restricting intake of sugar or foods that your body will quickly change into sugar so that your body has to look to other sources of energy. That reserve energy comes from fat! So basically eat fat to burn fat. Sounds great right? Who doesnt have a little adipose to burn? This diet doesnt recommend fried foods and canola oil Continue reading >>

Paleo, Ketogenic Or Slow Carb Diet: Which One Is Right For You?

Paleo, Ketogenic Or Slow Carb Diet: Which One Is Right For You?

Kickstarting a new diet can be challenging, choosing the correct diet plan can be even more demanding! These days there is an overwhelming choice of diet plans. For some time the fitness community has gravitated towards the Slow Carb Diet, Paleo Diet and Ketogenic Diet. For those who are looking to improve their lives and lose weight, which one is the best? While all three diets incorporate many of the same foods and even have overlapping likenesses and benefits, each diet has its own function. In this article, well explore the differences between these three plans and to decide which one is best for you! The Slow Carb Diet The Slow Carb diet is defined by 5 rules: Avoid all “white” carbohydrates – i.e. anything made from grains, all corn products, rice, quinoa, white potatoes and bread. Specifically avoid grains, sugars and starches. This does not include any white vegetables or legumes (cannellini beans or cauliflower). This does however, apply to all dairy. Stick to eating the same few meals – this makes it easier to plan. The notion behind this is that anything that is planned tends to be more successful. It also means that we spend less time thinking about what we can eat, sidestepping the very reason that many people fail at diets. Do not drink calories – in a bid to keep all calories nutritious the slow carb diet prohibits any calories from beverages, so no milk, juice, sodas etc. The exception to this rule is one glass of red wine daily. No fruit – with the exception of tomatoes and avocados in moderation the Slow Carb Diet limits all intake of fruit. Fruits tend to have quite a high GI and are considered simple carbohydrates. These are easily digested and raise your blood sugar levels rapidly. Take a day off every week – commonly known as a cheat Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide To The Keto Diet

The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide To The Keto Diet

The keto diet (also known as the ketogenic diet) is well known for being low in carbohydrates. Keto is a state in which the body produces ketones in the liver, which are then used for energy. The keto diet can also be known as a low carb diet, low carb high fat (LCHF), or any diet that limits carbohydrates to a low level (typically lower than 30 grams of carbs). What Is The Keto Diet? What Happens To My Body during Keto? What Do I Eat? What Are The Benefits of The Keto Diet? Physical Performance during The Keto Diet Are There Dangers to The Keto Diet? When you’re on the keto diet, because it’s lower in carbohydrates, most of your calories come from fats and protein to fuel the body. When you ingest carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into the simplest molecule possible, glucose. This molecule forces your body to produce insulin. Insulin transports carbs across membranes to either be used directly as energy or to be stored for later use (either in fat or muscle/liver glycogen). Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert into and use for energy at any given time. Glucose will be the first thing chosen to use for an energy source. Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream, to transport it around your body, and to store it where necessary. When your body is using glycogen or glucose as its main energy source, your body will not need to burn fat. It’s therefore more likely that your body will store fat so it can be used at a later point in time when your energy (glycogen) levels are low. So, when you’re on a higher carbohydrate diet, your body will use glycogen as its main energy source. However, when you lower your carb intake, your body is pushed into ketosis. Keto is a natural process which we rely on when our food intake i Continue reading >>

4 Popular Diets: The Pros And Cons Of Gluten-free, Paleo, Detox And Ketogenic

4 Popular Diets: The Pros And Cons Of Gluten-free, Paleo, Detox And Ketogenic

A high-school reunion, New Year’s Eve, the start of summer. Certain times of the year prompt a renewed commitment to getting your health, fitness and nutrition in order. We may want the nutrition part of the solution to lie in a perfect “new” diet, such as the gluten-free, paleo, detox and ketogenic programs that may be on your radar right now. You may be asking yourself what these words even mean—and if you should be following one of these diet plans. Below is an overview of some of the pros and cons of each, along with a list of foods you are allowed and not allowed to eat. One note before you dig in: Remember that nutrition is not one-size-fits-all. I fully believe that there is not one right way for all of us to eat. What works for your best friend or brother may not be the best choice for you. If you choose to start a new nutrition plan, I recommend (in addition to consulting with a registered dietician ) you find one that works for your schedule, health (physical and mental), budget, cooking ability and, well, your whole life. Whatever diet plan you choose, you won’t continue with it if it’s not a good fit overall. Gluten-Free Diet This diet excludes foods containing the protein gluten, which is found in some plant foods. It is primarily used to treat celiac disease, gluten intolerance and often general irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. What foods are included? Foods that do not contain gluten, such as: Fruits and vegetables Most dairy products Meat, fish and poultry Beans Nuts and seeds (including flaxseed) Grains that don’t contain gluten protein, such as amaranth, cornmeal and rice What foods are avoided? Any grain-based product containing gluten protein, including: Wheat Barley Rye Triticale Any foods made in a factory with these grains What are Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Keto: Whats The Difference?

Paleo Vs. Keto: Whats The Difference?

People may assume all low carb diets are equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. This is far from the truth, and the resulting confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. There are a lot of similarities between Paleolithic (Paleo) and ketogenic diets (KD), particularly when compared to the now discredited Standard American low fat, high carbohydrate diet. As a result, people may reasonably assume that all low carb diets are pretty much equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth, and the resulting confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. The similarities between Paleo and keto cluster around what they exclude: all grains and grain products (refined and unrefined), peas and beans, and refined sugars. In addition, the paleo diet excludes all dairy (milk, cream, and cheese), whereas the ketogenic diet allows butter, full fat cream and natural cheeses. The differences between the Paleo diet and KD are many, including: Amounts and sources of carbohydrates allowed or recommended Type, quality, and quantity of science supporting diet safety and efficacy Most importantly, the source and consistency of fuel to supply brain energy needs specifically the availability of ketones at adequate levels to replace glucose as the brains primary fuel Natural meats, poultry, fish (including farmed sources) Full-fat dairy (cheese, butter, ghee, Greek yogurt, cream including ice cream) High sugar fruit (orange, banana, apple, cherry, grape, peach, pear, pineapple) Low sugar fruit (berries, melon, tomato, avocado, ol Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs Atkins Vs Ketogenic Diet

Paleo Vs Atkins Vs Ketogenic Diet

Paleo, Atkins, Ketogenic… what the heck is the difference!? The Paleo diet, Atkins diet and ketogenic diet have a lot of overlap - in fact, you can actually be on all three of these diets at once. This overlap makes the three diets very easy to confuse and, it can make your decision on which diet is best for your goals a little bit tough. But, as always, you’ve got a scientist on your side and, today, I’m going to clear up the main difference. Let’s get started! Paleo vs Atkins vs Ketogenic Diet: a Comparison Ketogenic Diet To start off, I’d like to explain to you guys a bit about a biological state called nutritional ketosis. Pay attention, because this is a pretty important concept that may be a major factor in your dietary decision. Nutritional ketosis is a biological state in which your body being using fats, rather than glucose, as it’s main fuel source. In order for fats to be used as fuel, they are converted into ketone bodies, which is the basic goal of the ketogenic diet. Although more complex, cyclical ketogenic diets exist, in which you are cycling in and out of ketosis, with the basic ketogenic diet your body is in a constant state of nutritional ketosis. In order to enter into nutritional ketosis, you must drastically restrict your glucose supply, while concurrently increasing fat consumption so that your body is essentially forced into burning fat as fuel. Your macro breakdown should look something like 60-80% fat, 5% carbohydrates and the remainder as protein. As 1g carbohydrate is equivalent to approximately 4 calories, a 5% carbohydrate intake would equate to approximately 25g carbs daily for someone on a 2000 calorie per day diet. Keep in mind, these numbers are approximations and each person will enter ketosis at slightly different values, Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between The Paleo, Keto, And Banting Diets??

What’s The Difference Between The Paleo, Keto, And Banting Diets??

Hmm. You wouldn’t believe how often people get these three confused. Why??? Because they are all LOW CARB. But. They are NOT the same. I’m going to make it SUPER SIMPLE for you. First, I’m going to give a description (in a nutshell) what each of these diets boil down to. Then, we will cover some frequently asked questions. We will cover: What is the Paleo Diet? Questions surrounding the Paleo Diet. What is the Keto and Banting Diet? Questions surrounding the Keto/Banting Diet. Ready? The Paleo diet focuses on eating only natural whole foods. The crux: Eat like a caveman or hunter-gatherer, and eliminate foods that relate to civilisation in any way – i.e. agriculture: foods produced through farming grains, dairy etc. Why? The idea is that our modern lifestyle is at the root of all our problems. The Paleo diet aims to eradicate the bad habits associated with a modern diet (a diet high in trans-fats and processed carbs), to reduce the risk of suffering from chronic ailments like type 2 diabetes, depression, obesity, Alzheimer’s Disease and so forth. Food List: QUESTIONS: PALEO DIET Is Paleo high protein? Not necessarily. However, some specific weight-loss Paleo Diets sometimes specify a high protein component. Why is it called the Paleo Diet? “Paleo” is short for “Paleolithic” – and relates to foods that were available to people of the Paleolithic (caveman) Era. This was a time period before the rise of the Agricultural Revolution. Can you drink alcohol on the Paleo diet? This is a tough one. The easiest answer is: no. The basis of the Paleo diet is to move away from toxins and processed foods – it’s kind of the whole point, actually. BUT – life happens. So the best advice is to LIMIT alcohol intake AND select the right form of it. My point is, do Continue reading >>

Most People Shouldn't Attempt Low-carb Diets Like Keto Or Paleo

Most People Shouldn't Attempt Low-carb Diets Like Keto Or Paleo

Sustainable health change occurs not by finding a "perfect" diet — finding is fairly passive — but rather through creating an individualized health "mix." Creating is active, and health is an active process. To create an individualized health mix, you have to learn about the various nutrition options available and parse out the nutritional guidelines that will work for YOU. My personal mix is built upon being aware of what I put in my body, as well as pillars "stolen" from a variety of sources. I limit snacking and aim for a substantial gap between dinner and breakfast — thanks, intermittent fasting. I eat almost exclusively from the "outside of the grocery store" — meaning fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and good-quality fats — thanks, Paleo, and habits formed while being vegetarian. Plus, I eat what I love in moderation. I call this my "love it rule" — thanks, Weight Watchers for the balanced approach. I use what works for me and ignore what doesn't. Curious what your "mix" is? Earlier, I covered the pros and cons of high-protein diets. Then, I examined the vegetarian versus vegan versus high-protein debate. I've also tackled "low-fat" diets, the Mediterranean diet, and Weight Watchers. Today a smorgasbord of smaller analyses (I only have so much space and the material for analysis is endless): the ketogenic diet, Paleo, intermittent fasting, and meal delivery services. Ketogenic diet The ketogenic diet advocates extremely low-carbohydrate (10-15 grams daily) and high-fat (75 per cent of diet) consumption. The goal is to put your body into ketosis so that it uses ketones as energy. The rationale is that the diet gives you the benefits of fasting — such as fat loss — without actually having to fast. I know I am supposed to be "Switzerland," Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Paleo And Keto Diets?

What’s The Difference Between Paleo And Keto Diets?

We live in a remarkable time. Anyone with an internet connection or smartphone can access a staggering amount of information in just moments. Although much of the time spent on the internet is devoted to watching cat videos on YouTube (my personal favorite), many people are using this wealth of knowledge to take their health education into their own hands. They’re investigating a host of nutrition and lifestyle options, including the paleo diet and one of the most searched diets in 2016, the keto (ketogenic) diet. Over the past 20 years, I’ve explored variations of these two dietary approaches. I’ve found them to be remarkably effective for a variety of needs—ranging from fat loss to reducing inflammation to improving athletic performance. Paleo Diet vs. Keto Diet Based on questions I’ve gotten, there’s clearly a lot of confusion on what constitutes a paleo vs keto diet. This article should help put both approaches in proper context and help you decide which might be a good option for you. The Paleo Diet Unlike most dietary approaches the Paleo diet was not “thought up” by any given person (although there certainly have been researchers who have championed the approach). The Paleo diet concept was born through the observations of dozens, if not hundreds, of anthropologists and medical explorers. They realized that hunter-gatherer groups were largely free of modern degenerative diseases. Yes, these people were remarkably healthy even despite an almost complete lack of modern medical interventions. While these groups suffered from high rates of infectious disease, injury, and childbirth complications (all areas where modern medicine excels), even those who lived into advanced age were largely free of obesity, type 2 diabetes, autoimmunity, heart disease an Continue reading >>

What Are Core Differences Between The Paleo, Keto And Bulletproof Diets?

What Are Core Differences Between The Paleo, Keto And Bulletproof Diets?

0 As it is January and it’s the start of a new Year- I’ve seen many people start new diets or ways of eating. Because I’ve been eating Paleo for over 6 years, and now have adopted eating Keto with aspects of Bulletproof- I thought I’d share what I’ve learned if you are considering making a lifestyle change or just want to shed some pounds. I would like to stress that this is a lifestyle choice- when you start digging into the “why” behind eating Paleo and keto, you realize that the modern diet is full of crap that is terrible for you. At all costs you should avoid grains and processed foods! This doesn’t mean that you can’t occasionally eat these foods (trust me, I fall off the bandwagon sometimes), but you will feel much better when you adopt this style of eating as a lifestyle versus a short term “diet”. I eat Keto about 80% of the diet and then Paleo on the weekends, etc or when I am craving a little sugar or carbs. Because I can’t control myself around sugar it is best for me to eat a diet that eliminates it (Keto) because I have a hard time eating it in moderation. Paleo, at a Glance: Based on the idea of eating how our ancestors ate. The core idea behind eating Paleo is that our bodies have not adapted to eat our current grain based diet and that we are meant to subsist mainly on (grassfed/organic) meat, fats, veggies and some fruits/starches in moderation. There is a big emphasis on quality of what you are putting in your body. There is a ton of genetically modified and processed crap in the modern diet and the principles of Paleo (and Bulletproof) stress eliminating these foods. Research also suggests that the grains in today’s modern diet are so highly processed they do way more harm than any good, and that a lot of today’s modern di Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

What Does A Ketogenic Paleo Diet Look Like?

Update: I did a (failed) ketosis experiment on myself that you can read about here, here, here, and here. Jimmy Moore is dropping weight with the fervor of a college wrestler right now on his experimental ketogenic diet. In fact, he’s lost about 47 pounds in the last 3 months, and he’s still going. He’s an awesome guy and he’s been struggling with his weight for a while now, so I’m psyched for him to say the least. He gives updates every month or so on his progress, but he never tells his readers exactly WHAT he’s eating. I’m itching to know. Now, Jimmy isn’t strictly Paleo: he eats full fat dairy, so even if he did report to us what he was eating, it wouldn’t be super helpful to a lot of people. I got to thinking what a ketogenic Paleo diet might look like. Without all that cheese and cream to assume the fat positions, it’d require a lot more tallow, lard, coconut oil, and coconut milk, as well as the fatty meats, eggs, nuts, and avocados. Here’s a picture of one of Jimmy’s meals to give you an idea of the amount of dairy he’s eating (well, at least at this particular meal). I think that’s sausage, avocado, scrambled eggs, some sort of hot sauce, and heavy cream. By the way, I’m in no way criticizing Jimmy right now. If I could eat dairy, I probably would, and I think this meal looks amazing. What’s ketosis? Before I go any further with this, I’ll briefly explain what ketogenic means and why one would aspire to be on a ketogenic diet. Some say you need to eat fewer than 30 grams of carbs per day to be in ketosis. It may be fewer than that to get into a deep state of ketosis, and you must not eat too much protein either. So a ketogenic diet is high fat, low(ish) protein, and very low carb. More on that in a moment. When you are in ketos Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet Versus Ketogenic Diet

Paleo Diet Versus Ketogenic Diet

In the world of diets it’s hard to pick the one best suited for you. This is why it’s important to understand each diet and how each one can help you achieve your goals. Both the Paleo diet and ketogenic diet have been increasing in popularity. Although you may have a broad understanding of them, before you start either one it’s good to understand them in-depth. Here we compare these two popular diets to reveal their similarities and differences so you can make an informed decision. What is the ketogenic diet? Typically when a person starts a diet the reason is to lose weight. The ketogenic diet has been praised for its ability to promote quick and effective weight loss. But how you ask? Well… The premise behind the ketogenic diet is that the body will use its own fat-burning abilities to lose weight within 10 days. Although this may be appealing it’s important to know that some consider this diet to be dangerous. On the ketogenic diet you are restricted to a low or no-carbohydrate meal plan. By doing this the body goes into a state called “ketosis.” When we consume little to no carbohydrates molecules called ketones build up. The process of ketosis restricts conventional sources of energy – carbohydrates – so the body begins to use its own fat supply to produce energy. The nutrient intake on a ketogenic diet 70-75% of calories from fat (calorie counting is optional) 20-25% from protein 5-10% from carbohydrate on a daily basis Difference between Paleo diet and ketogenic diet The Paleo diet works on the premise of eating like our ancestors – or cavemen. The diet restricts artificial food and uses only organic, free-range, natural items. Food item wise, the Paleo diet is similar to the ketogenic diet as it limits the use of carbohydrates, but differs a Continue reading >>

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