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Is Ketosis Safe While Breastfeeding

Atkins For Breastfeeding Mothers

Atkins For Breastfeeding Mothers

For new mothers, losing weight is probably the furthest thing from their minds and in my opinion, this is exactly as it should be. I think that in our culture mothers are sometimes expected to bounce back to ‘normal’ as though nothing has changed! In reality, everything has changed and you have a lot more important things to think about in those first few weeks or months. As well as getting to know your baby, establishing breastfeeding, adjusting your sleeping patterns and often your expectations you need to try to give yourself time to rest and recover. However, at some point when you feel ready to begin losing the baby weight and you have consulted with your doctor, the Atkins Nutritional Approach is an excellent choice. This is true no matter how you feed your baby but when breastfeeding there are some extra considerations so I’ll focus on these for this article. Won’t breastfeeding make me lose the baby weight? While breastfeeding certainly helps with losing the baby weight more quickly, it’s not a magic fix. Just as you cannot ‘out-train a bad diet’ you can’t ‘out-breastfeed a bad diet’ either! There are many many regular gym goers and marathon runners that are overweight proving that exercise alone will not make you lose weight. In the same way, it stands to reason that if your diet is not good, the extra calories needed for breastfeeding will not make you lose the baby weight either. Should I wait until the baby is weaned? Sometimes you may see the advice to wait until the baby is weaned before starting a diet. However the World Health Organisation say: “Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended up to 6 months of age, with continued breastfeeding along with appropriate complementary foods up to two years of age or beyond.” Obviously, the deci Continue reading >>

Low Carbohydrate Diets And Breastfeeding

Low Carbohydrate Diets And Breastfeeding

Article written by Dr Susan Tawia, Manager, Breastfeeding Information and Research team, for the January 2017 health professional member eNewsletter. Low carbohydrate (carb), high fat diets continue to be popular and women of reproductive age are following them. They will often change their diet to a more ‘conventional’ one during pregnancy, but are often keen to return to a weight-loss diet, that they have had success with, after the pregnancy. So, what do we know about the effect of low carb, high fat diets on breastmilk composition and on the metabolism of the breastfeeding woman? The lack of research on this type of diet, and the possible effect on breastmilk composition, breastfeeding women and their infants, was highlighted by both breastfeeding experts and dietitians in 2004 (Heinig & Doberne, 2004; Wood & Hilldebrandt, 2004) at the height of the popularity of the low carb, weight loss diet advocated by Dr RC Atkins — the Atkins diet. Research on low carb, high fat diets has been undertaken, but surprisingly, only one study has been done. Mohammad, Sunehag, & Haymond (2009) looked at maternal breastmilk production, infant intake and maternal glucose metabolism and broadly looked at the macronutrients in breastmilk. Two moderate hypocaloric diets (1785 ± 22 kcal/day) were assessed in a cross-over design: seven, healthy lactating mothers and their infants were studied on 2 occasions in random order for 8 days separated by 1 to 2 weeks. On one occasion, the subjects received the low carb, high fat (LCHF, 30% of energy as carbohydrate and 55% as fat) and on the other occasion received the high carb, low fat diet (HCLF, 60% of energy as carbohydrate and 25% as fat). It is important to note that the amount of carbohydrates consumed during the LCHF was around 150 Continue reading >>

Lose Weight Postpartum Intermittent Fasting While Breastfeeding

Lose Weight Postpartum Intermittent Fasting While Breastfeeding

Lose Weight Postpartum | Intermittent Fasting While Breastfeedimg I was warned off immediately from fasting while breastfeeding even intermittent fasting such as eating during a 6 or 8 hour window (fasting for 18 or16) or a full 24 hours once/twice a week. As for intermittent fasting while breastfeeding, since I wanted to begin IF while nursing, I first considered things like established milk supply and breastfeeding history. I was oddly lucky in that no matter how much I exercised, or how little I ate, I kept a steady oversupply of milk. I also wondered about the fact that there are women who have breastfed just fine during famines. I personally think the whole you must eat an extra 500-800 calories while breastfeeding is slightly over exaggerated. And I think trying to eat that way contributed to my having a hard time losing the baby weight. I probably could have maintained my normal eating of around 2200 calories and still nursed. But of course, this is all based off my personal experience with breastfeeding, I definitely wouldn’t recommend this for a mom who may have trouble with nursing. Source Here is a link to my first week’s experience in Intermittent Fasting while breastfeeding. And my personal journey to lose weight postpartum The benefits of intermittent fasting such as Lean Gains and Eat Stop Eat method are inticing to me. Since I wanted to begin intermittent fasting while breastfeeding, I decided to research what the possible effects would be to my milk and milk production as this is my first concern. Intermittent Fasting While Breastfeeding: Milk Consistency It seems like many people suggested my milk would turn to crap or poison if I began a fast that was longer than 16 hours. I decided to look at some studies that studied the makeup of lactose/milk a Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs To Eat When You're Breastfeeding And Following A Paleo Diet

How Many Carbs To Eat When You're Breastfeeding And Following A Paleo Diet

To carb or not to carb? That is the question....it seems like I'm asked about carb levels all the time and when I received an email from a client about a suddenly low milk supply after starting a Paleo diet, I knew her story would probably resonate with lots of other gals. So, here you have it. My former (most wonderful client) is about 4 months postpartum. She started going to Crossfit mom's as a way of connecting with other women and it was the only program in town that made it easy for her to workout with her baby. Since the start of the new year, her Crossfit group decided to start a one month "Paleo Challenge". Of course, I support this kind of awesome nutritional reset ANYTIME, no challenge required, but I was thrilled to hear she was going to give paleo a good ol' college try. 10 days into the challenge, she had lost 6 lbs. She wasn't sleeping and neither was her baby, who previously slept through the night. She also noticed that her milk supply had significantly decreased. What was going wrong? Should she give in to the bread cravings that were taking over her life? I asked her to punch her nutrition into an online app (I usually recommend My Fitness Pal) which as it turns out, she already did (she's so smart). When she told me her macro's, I instantly knew what the problem was. Carbs were only making up about 20-25% of her diet. Not by choice, just by accident. This would explain the insane weight drop, often caused by rapid water loss when switching from a SAD diet where carb levels are anywhere between 50-60%. The most common mistake folks make when going Paleo is going too low carb by accident. While a Paleo diet is typically lower in carbs than the modern SAD, it isn't designed to be a "low carb diet". Going low carb can happen by accident when we replace t Continue reading >>

Babies Thrive Under A Ketogenic Metabolism

Babies Thrive Under A Ketogenic Metabolism

Some people, even some scientists who study ketogenic metabolism, have the idea that ketogenesis is somehow abnormal, or exceptional; an adaptation for emergencies only. We disagree. One reason we think a ketogenic metabolism is normal and desirable, is that human newborns are in ketosis. Despite the moderate sugar content of human breast milk, breastfeeding is particularly ketogenic. This period of development is crucial, and there is extensive brain growth during it. Although the composition of breast milk can be affected by diet [1], it is reasonable to assume that breast milk has always been ketogenic, and this is not an effect of modernisation. When the brain is in its period of highest growth, and when the source of food is likely to be close to what it evolved to be for that period, ketones are used to fuel that growth. If nothing else, this suggests that learning is well supported by a ketogenic metabolism. It is also consistent with the ability of ketogenic diets to treat a variety of seemingly unrelated brain disorders and brain trauma. Newborn infants are in ketosis. This is their normal state. Breastfeeding is particularly ketogenic (compared to formula feeding). Breastfeeding longer (up to a point) is associated with better health outcomes. This suggests the hypothesis that weaning onto a ketogenic diet would be healthier than weaning onto a high-carb diet. (Mark-up ours) Human babies are in ketosis Soon after birth, human babies are in ketosis, and remain so while breastfeeding [2]. They use ketones and fats for energy and for brain growth. When this has been studied, in the first couple of hours after birth, babies aren't immediately in ketosis. There is a short delay [3]. During that brief period before ketogenesis starts, lactate (confusingly not to do Continue reading >>

Here’s What Research Says About Keto While Breastfeeding

Here’s What Research Says About Keto While Breastfeeding

Did you know that soon after babies are born they enter a natural state of ketosis? Yep, you read that right — research shows that newborn infants are in ketosis and remain in this normal, healthy state while breastfeeding[*][*]. Furthermore, research confirms that breast milk from healthy mothers is actually made up of 50-60% fat, and the cholesterol in breast milk supplies babies with almost six times the amount that most adults consume in their diets [*]. So, if babies are naturally born in ketosis and benefit from using fat and ketones for fuel, then why would it be an issue for a breastfeeding mother to follow a ketogenic diet/lifestyle? What Does the Research Say About Keto While Breastfeeding? Unfortunately, the current scientific literature surrounding the ketogenic diet and breastfeeding is extremely limited. However, one study performed in 2009 compared a low-carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet to a high-carbohydrate, low fat (HCLF) diet in breastfeeding women[*]. Results from this study showed the following: Regardless of the diet, daily breast milk production and daily infant breast milk intake remained the same. Neither diet had an effect on milk lactose or protein concentration; however, milk fat concentration and the energy content of milk were higher during the LCHF diet than the HCLF diet. Infants’ energy intake (kcal/day) was higher during the LCHF diet than during the HCLF diet. The estimated average maternal energy expenditure and the sum of maternal energy expenditure plus milk energy content were higher during the LCHF diet than during the HCLF diet. Based on these results, researchers concluded that breastfeeding mothers could lose more weight while consuming a LCHF diet than a HCLF diet without affecting milk production and still supplying the Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding On A Ketogenic Diet

Breastfeeding On A Ketogenic Diet

Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet: my personal experience Having a baby is one of the most exciting and nerve wracking times in your life, one great big cocktail of emotions. With nine months to prepare, trying to absorb as much information as possible can make you panic rather than put your mind at ease. There’s an abundance of general information on the internet but a lot of this is conflicting and very confusing! I’ll seek to answer the question I know you’ll all be wondering. Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet: Is it safe? I began my ketogenic journey during pregnancy in preparation for our daughter being born. Searching the internet for information on the ketogenic lifestyle and new mothers, I found the information on breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet was limited and very conflicting. Every mother wants to do what’s best for their child – I desperately wanted to give myself the best chance of breastfeeding our daughter as possible. My ultimate concern was that the keto lifestyle may prevent my ability to do this. I wanted to share my story with you in the hope that it may provide some of that missing resource that i was desperately seeking when my journey first began. The darkness After 12 weeks of being fully keto adapted, I was feeding my baby one afternoon and noticed that she was becoming very frustrated. She had only been feeding for a short while and began pulling at my boob, becoming very restless. Whilst looking for the cause of her frustration, to my horror I realised that my milk had completely dried up! I was immediately overwhelmed with blind panic. A moment of weakness, fuelled by sheer panic and a lack of sleep, resulted in me finding an excuse to get my hands on the forbidden foods – refined carbs and sugar! The cravings part of my brain h Continue reading >>

I Am Breastfeeding My Baby And I Want To Lose Weight. Is A Low Carbohydrate Diet Safe For A Breastfeeding Mother?

I Am Breastfeeding My Baby And I Want To Lose Weight. Is A Low Carbohydrate Diet Safe For A Breastfeeding Mother?

Many women are anxious to get back in shape after childbirth, but we must remember that pregnancy weight wasn’t gained overnight, and won’t disappear quickly, either. It is wise for mothers to wait until two months postpartum to purposely lose weight, as the mother’s body needs time to recover from childbirth and establish a good milk supply. Many mothers find that by following a sensible diet they are able to lose weight steadily while breastfeeding. Anyone who wants to start a weight loss diet should consult with their physician to rule out any health problems that would contraindicate the diet. If a breastfeeding mother is interested in any type of weight loss diet, there are several factors she should consider. Nutritional balance-- A breastfeeding mother should receive adequate and balanced nutrition, for her breastfed baby’s sake, and the sake of her own health. Otherwise, she risks depleting her body’s nutritional stores. A malnourished mother may have inadequate levels of vitamins A, D, B6 and B12 in her milk, and may risk decreased milk supply. Hunger-- Inadequate caloric intake results in feeling weak, tired, and drained. When a mother feels this way, taking care of a baby is very difficult, and these very real feelings can result in lowered milk supply and inhibited milk ejection (letdown) reflex. The Subcommittee on Nutrition during Lactation advises breastfeeding mothers to take in 1500-1800 calories per day. Rate of weight loss-- Gradual weight loss has not been found to affect either the mother’s milk supply or the baby’s health. However, there are documented concerns when a breastfeeding mother loses weight rapidly, defined as more than a pound (.45 kg) per week. Toxins, such as environmental contaminants PCBs and pesticides, are stored in Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto Os And Bio Max Review Best Fat Loss Ketone Supplement

Pruvit Keto Os And Bio Max Review Best Fat Loss Ketone Supplement

0320SHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS is a DRINK that puts your body into ketosis in 59 minutes or less, without changing your diet! Puts your body into FAT BURNING MODE! Pruvit KETO OS and Keto Max Review: Does KETO OS Work? Prüvit’s proprietary formula, KETO OS, has been researched, tested, and is doctor approved. It is the first natural consumer product on the market to provide elevated blood ketone levels to the body. Profession athlete’s body builders, and every day people are using our products for fat loss, muscle preservation, appetite suppression, increased focus, better sleep and more! You simply mix Keto OS with water and drink it, 1-2 times a day to benefit from the amazing effects of Ketones in your body. What is Keto? Pruvit – KETO OS Review Save 10% on your order today by choosing today and smart ship option! No coupon code needed, discount is automatically applied for you! Have Questions? Click live chat at the bottom of the screen! What are the side effects of KETO OS? I get asked that question a lot. I realize it’s because most supplements out there have nasty side effects and you are often miserable while taking them. Often, at the same time you are dieting and starving yourself while on those supplements. Restricting calories makes you tired, hungry, gives you mental fog and makes you CRANKY and HANGRY! This is why many fail. You are depriving yourself and that is not a normal lifestyle or a long term solution. You will eventually give up, and all that you accomplished will be lost. Many end up bingeing on bad foods because they starved themselves for so long, quickly gaining all their weight back that they lost. Keto OS is different because it Continue reading >>

Case Study: Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding Mothers

Case Study: Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding Mothers

I recently had an interesting experience helping a mother with a breastfeeding situation. I received her permission to share her story here as a case study to help other mothers/breastfeeding counselors. Helping situation: The mother contacted me because her baby was experiencing poor weight gain. Baby was three months old and after having gained steadily during the first two months had not gained weight in a month and was still at nine and half pounds. In addition to talking about signs of dehydration, we explored a ton of possibilities during the hour-long call, including the fact that baby started daycare and then weight gain stopped. Towards the end of the call, I asked a couple of questions about the mother’s diet, mentioning that sometimes certain proteins in foods can cause sensitivities in the baby. Mother paused and then said, “so protein might possibly be related to this?” She then shared that she has been on a high protein/low-carb diet that she started last month. My brain tickled with a memory and sure enough in the conference notes from Diana West’s presentation at the 2011 LLL of Missouri conference, I found the note that, “Low carb diets have been observed to significantly decrease milk production.” I suggested mama go back to eating the way she used to do. Follow-up results: At the beginning of this month, the mother emailed me to let me know that she’d discontinued the low-carb diet and baby gained a pound in a week. A second follow-up email reported another pound of weight gain and a third email showed pictures of a happy, chubby breastfeeding baby. I was fascinated at the potent results from this seemingly small/possibly unrelated change. LLLI has additional information about low-carb diets and breastfeeding women here, but it does not Continue reading >>

New Mother Nearly Dies From A Low Carb Diet: 32-year-old Developed Life-threatening Condition After Ditching Bread, Rice And Pasta While Breastfeeding

New Mother Nearly Dies From A Low Carb Diet: 32-year-old Developed Life-threatening Condition After Ditching Bread, Rice And Pasta While Breastfeeding

A new mother developed a life-threatening condition due to eating a low carbohydrate diet while breastfeeding, doctors claim. The 32-year-old Swedish woman was rushed to hospital with nausea and vomiting, heart palpitations, trembling and spasms in her limbs. When questioned, she said she had been following a a strict low carbohydrate high fat diet (LCHF) in order to lose her baby weight, doctors describing her case in the Journal of Medical Case Reports said. The regime saw the woman, who is unidentified, eating less than 20g of carbohydrate day, the equivalent of a medium-sized potato, or a thick slice of toast, while breastfeeding her 10-month-old son. In the UK, adults are advised to get half of their daily energy intake from carbohydrates, according to a report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition, who advise the Government. This is the equivalent of 200 - 240g of carbohydrates in a person eating 2,000 calories a day. The woman said she had lost 4kg on the diet but had begun to feel very ill. In hospital, medics carried out tests and discovered she was suffering from ketoacidosis, a rare but potentially life-threatening condition normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. ‘The primary diagnosis was thought to be ketoacidosis due to starvation induced by the LCHF diet,’ doctors writing in the journal. When a person has raised blood glucose levels, or are eating a low carbohydrate diet, their body may go into a state of ketosis. Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blo Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Follow The Banting Diet While Breastfeeding?

Is It Safe To Follow The Banting Diet While Breastfeeding?

Not all moms bounce back to their pre-baby body. If you’re considering the banting diet made popular by professor Tim Noakes in his book The Real Meal Revolution, read on before embarking on this journey, especially if you are breastfeeding. Q: I’m following the Banting diet and am breastfeeding my baby. Can it affect my baby negatively in any way since I’m not consuming carbs? I’m also curious if any other diets could affect breastfeeding babies, for example mothers who are vegans or don’t consume dairy? Nutritional therapist Hannah Kaye answers: Unless you are avoiding all fruit, vegetables and grains, you are, in effect, still eating carbohydrates. A cup of broccoli contains roughly 6g of carbs and a cup of cauliflower contains roughly 5g. For that reason, following Banting does not mean you are carb free. It only means that you are grain free (and legume free). However, there are potentially two issues when following a low-carb diet while breastfeeding. The first is related to entering a state of ketosis. This is when the body does not have enough glucose for energy. Stored fats are then broken down for energy, resulting in a build up of ketones (produced when the body burns fat fuel) within the body. There is not enough research to say whether the ketones that are excreted into the blood and urine are also present in breast milk and, if so, at what levels these would pose a danger to the breastfed baby. The second issue is related to rapid weight loss, which is more than 0.5kg per week while breastfeeding. Gradual weight loss has not been found to affect the mother’s milk supply or the baby’s health, but rapid loss has been linked to a decrease in milk supply. Additionally, toxins are stored in body fat. Rapid weight loss increases the release of thes Continue reading >>

Keto During Pregnancy

Keto During Pregnancy

I get a ton of emails a few months after these consults telling me that they are ecstatic and are now pregnant but are wondering on what to eat now. As if this diet of REAL food would be harmful to a fetus. There are many reasons why to not add in certain foods like gluten and dairy. Many times when cravings get the best of pregnant clients and they consume these foods, the auto-immune response can result in a miscarriage. But even if the clients are committed about staying away from gluten and dairy, they often worry that too low of carbs is bad for the fetus. You will never find evidence of this, but you will read it all over the web. The information that clients read have a few flaws: 1. A huge mistake is when people and doctors compare benign dietary ketosis to diabetic ketoacidosis. You can produce ketones in a starvation state. So instead of using a well-formulated low carb diet, they starved pregnant rats to get them into ketosis. The flaw in that evidence should be obvious. 2. The last form of this “evidence” is when they sliced up the brains of rat fetuses and saturated them in ketones. What happened was that the brain cells lived but it stopped producing new brain cells. This is thought to be evidence that ketosis causes retardation. Now let’s dive into the facts. The lean human body is 74% fat and 26% protein by calories. Fats are a structural part of every human cell and the preferred fuel source of the mitochondria, the energy-burning units of each cell. A fetus naturally uses ketones before and immediately after birth. Many studies done on pregnant pigs that are placed on ketogenic diets have fetuses with “increased fetal brain weight, cell size and protein content. In the early stages of pregnancy there is an upsurge in body fat accumulation, whic Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Prof Noakes is on trial for ‘advising’ a mom to wean her baby onto low carb, high fat foods. Could babies’ innate ketosis – a state more often associated with low-carb, high-fat diets – be an arrow in Prof Noakes’ defence’s quiver? By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD Did you know that human newborns and exclusively breastfed babies are in ketosis? 1 I am a dietitian, with two years of intensive postgraduate training in nutrition, and I didn’t realise this until just over a month ago. The fact that human babies are naturally in ketosis is an inconvenient truth because it implies that ketosis (which also occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet) is not only a natural metabolic state for human infants, but that it’s probably beneficial too. Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. 2 “Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. ” A word on ketones and ketosis Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body uses fat as fuel in preference to carbohydrates – as occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. The body makes ketones from fat, when dietary glucose (from carbohydrates and sugar) is low. Ketones can be used as fuel to produce the energy your body and brain needs to function. The human brain only has two options for fuel: glucose or ketones. The other body orga Continue reading >>

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

Is Safe While Pregnant And/or Breastfeeding?

KETO//OS is quite safe during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. It is recommended to choose the caffeine free Keto//OS and drink plenty of water. Ketones naturally exist in the body, and are created as a normal process of fat metabolism. KETO//OS simply provides these ketones from an exogenous source, but they have the same beneficial impact. However, if you suffer from any medical conditions, it is always safe to consult your health care provider prior to starting any new nutritional supplement. Continue reading >>

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