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Is Ketosis Necessary On Low Carb Diet

Why A Low-carb Diet Is Best For Weight Loss

Why A Low-carb Diet Is Best For Weight Loss

Why a Low-Carb Diet Is Best for Weight Loss If you want to lose weight, you have a number of choices. The most popular is to cut calories and eat a low-fat diet. A way that’s becoming more popular, because it works much better, is to cut carbohydrates. Here we’ll take a look at scientific proof that a low-carb diet is best for weight loss. No calorie counting The biggest impediment to losing weight on a low-calorie diet is hunger. If you voluntarily reduce calories while eating the same foods, you get hungry, as is to be expected. Your body defends its weight, i.e. it has a set point, and makes you hungry if your weight moves away from the set point. On a low-carbohydrate diet, you merely cut the amount of carbohydrates in the diet, and in most studies looking at low-carb diets, the dieters ate as much as they wanted. Only carbohydrates were restricted. Cutting carbohydrates lowers levels of the hormone insulin, which signals the body to store fat, and which is responsible for setting the body weight set point. The result is nearly effortless weight loss. In the first study we’ll look at, a group of obese women were randomized to either a low-fat, low-calorie diet, or a low-carbohydrate diet that was not restricted in calories, and followed for 6 months. Weight loss result in the chart below. The low-carb group ate 20 g of carbohydrate daily, but were allowed to increase this to 40 to 60 g after 2 weeks, so long as they remained in ketosis as shown by urinary testing. The low-fat group was restricted in calories by 30% and ate about 55% of their calories as carbohydrates. Despite the fact that the low-carb group could eat as much as they wanted, they spontaneously reduced their calorie intake to about the same as the low-fat group. That shows the power of low-carb Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Necessary On A Low-carb Diet? Let’s Ask The Experts!

Is Ketosis Necessary On A Low-carb Diet? Let’s Ask The Experts!

One of the most asked about aspects of livin’ la vida low-carb has got to the issue of ketosis. There is so much misinformation about there about this very natural state that the body goes through when you are on a low-carb diet (primarily confusing it with a serious condition that diabetics must be careful of called ketoacidosis–NOT the same as ketosis). As such, there may be confusion that lingers out there among my readers who are just learning about this way of eating. In this recent blog post where I provided some “quickie one-liner” responses to some e-mails, I made the following statement: Being in ketosis is like being pregnant–you either are or you’re not; regardless of what the Ketosticks show you, if you are eating less than 30g carbohydrates a day, then you ARE in ketosis.? One of my readers named Charles Fred decided to respond to my statement which he disagreed with and it gets to the very heart of this issue about ketosis. Here’s what he wrote: Your statement reflects today?’s informed opinion, but my article in work, ?Unified Physiology of the Metabolic Syndrome,? has given me an unusual perspective which for the sake of brevity I?’ll state dogmatically. Ketosis need not and should not be part of low-carb eating. Low-carb diets should never be labeled as ?ketogenic? diets. Ketosis appears to be an ?Induction? phase of low-carb eating, but in fact it is a last ditch response to inadequate glucose. As such it is either temporary or avoidable. Low-carb eating is the evolution-derived diet of humans (unlike other primates). Humans are carnivores, hunters, because human evolution happened pre-fire and pre-agriculture when very few carbs were edible. For carnivores, gluconeogenesis in the liver supplies all necessary glucose. But if someone a Continue reading >>

3 Tips For Protein Consumption On A Low Carb Or Ketogenic Diet

3 Tips For Protein Consumption On A Low Carb Or Ketogenic Diet

Check out Dr. Steve Phinney and Dr. Jeff Voleks post on how much protein you need in nutritional ketosis . Once you know how much to consume, follow the tips below to perfect your protein. #1. Watch out for protein sources that contain carbs, such as nuts Whole food like meat, fish, poultry, nuts, eggs, and cheese are quality sources of protein. One egg or an ounce of these other sources listed each contain about the same amount of proteingenerallyabout 7 grams. When choosing your protein sources, keep in mind the carbohydrates in some foods. Those carbs can add up quickly, especially with nuts, some processed meats, tofu and certain vegetarian/vegan meat substitutes (see our guide for vegans and vegetarians ). Every source counts, so choose with caution and always check the nutrition labels ! The carbohydrate content of protein-containing foods varies. Lets take nuts as an example. From macadamias with 4 grams of carbs per ounce to cashews (which are not technically a nut) with 9 grams of carbs per ounce, the type you choose matters when it comes to keeping your total carbs low. #2. Make sure youre getting enough protein Too little protein can compromise your lean tissue mass (Hoffer 1984). When daily protein intake is inadequate, the body turns to lean tissue to meet its protein needs. This happens more rapidly when fasting for a prolonged period (greater than 24 hours) (Owen 1969). Its easy to get your protein needs met through meat consumption, but its not the only way. Because a ketogenic diet is high in fat and moderate in protein, vegetarians, vegans and pescetarians can follow this lifestyle as well. One ounce of protein-containing food contains about 7 grams of protein. Here are a few options for what a days worth of protein intake could look like for someone Continue reading >>

Is It Necessary To Include High Fat Intake In A Ketosis Diet, Or Is It Just A Convenience, Because Isn’t The Idea To Burn One’s Body Fat To Make Up For The Lesser Caloric Intake?

Is It Necessary To Include High Fat Intake In A Ketosis Diet, Or Is It Just A Convenience, Because Isn’t The Idea To Burn One’s Body Fat To Make Up For The Lesser Caloric Intake?

Hi, It is actually necessary to include more healthy fat in your diet if you want to follow keto diet. It is one of the major differences between low-carb diet and ketogenic diet. (low-carb diet does not emphasize on eating more fat while ketogenic diet does) Ketogenic diet is a diet that is high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. In other words, the fat-protein-carbs ratio should be around 7:2:1. You can include more healthy fat by eating more: Coconut oil Olive oil Avocado Organic butter Nuts (Almonds, Walnuts, Cashews…) Seeds (Flaxseeds, Chia seeds…) Cheese If you want to learn more about Keto diet, you can read my blog post where I listed all useful resources of ketogenic diet. Here’s the link: I would suggest that you watch all those videos to better understand how human body works when following a keto diet, and get a well-rated cookbook to get started. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs Keto: Why Ketosis Is Different From A Low Carb Diet

Low Carb Vs Keto: Why Ketosis Is Different From A Low Carb Diet

Free resources, guides, tips and tools on how to improve your health, food, fitness and more! Low Carb vs Keto: Why Ketosis is Different From A Low Carb Diet Are you making a critical mistake when it comes to ketosis?Ive been extremely guilty of it in the past. One of the biggest mistakes for people trying to improve their health is the misconception that a low carbohydrate diet equals a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, this isnt the case and could be killing your efforts to get all of the health benefits you are looking for. There are some critical differences in what people think a low-carb high-fat (LCHF) diet is and what a ketogenic diet is. High carb doesnt mean diabetic. Just like low carb doesnt mean ketogenic. If youre not super down with what ketosis is, it is simply a metabolic state of using fats for energy. This provides a lot of benefits that we can get into later, but long story short, there are numerous benefits that youre going to be missing out on if you are simply low-carb and not definitively in ketosis. Your low carb diet can actually be pretty brutal if it is not a ketogenic diet. As evidence, this is a maddening conversation that bubbles up more and more as I wont shut up about ketogenic diets: Person: Yeah, I tried ketosis and it sucked, I felt awful. Doesnt work for me. Me: Hmm, thats weird, did you check your ketone levels? Person: No. But, I was low carb. Ketosis isnt for me. It sucks. Me: Well low carb doesnt mean youre burning fats and utilizing ketones, so your body was still probably trying to use carbs as fuel, but you didnt have enough around eating low carb, which is why it sucked. Person: Im not tracking. Ketosis sucks. And so do you. This person was low-carb, not keto. There is a huge difference. By why? Time for some definitions: Low-c Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Vs. Low-carb Diet: A Personal Choice

Ketogenic Diet Vs. Low-carb Diet: A Personal Choice

Ketogenic diets (aka keto diets, nutritional ketosis or NK) are currently all the rage, and for good reason. As I wrote in a previous post a few weeks ago, very-low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets (VLCKDs) are extremely effective for weight loss and diabetes, among other things. There's also emerging evidence suggesting they may be beneficial for certain cancers and neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease and ALS (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease). Having previously worked in a clinical setting with several patients who had the misfortune of contracting these diseases, I find it very encouraging that following a ketogenic might offer some improvement for them, as well as others in the same boat. I follow a VLCKD and receive a lot of great feedback from others who have also experienced overwhelmingly positive results with this way of eating. I love hearing these success stories, so please keep them coming. However, one reader named Michelle had this to say in the comments section of my recent article: "I don't do well on a very low carb diet; I have to have around 50-70 g's of carbs a day to feel well and function. I guess this is still low carb when compared to the standard diet, but find so much prejudice against me because people say 'If you just stuck to eating VLC you would eventually lose weight and feel better'. This just is not the case with me. I've adapted the LC diet for me and I feel great and I am losing weight steadily. Please folks, stop thinking that one size fits all, it does not! Great site. Thank you for all your efforts." I was disappointed to hear that this woman -- who is most definitely following a low-carb diet and having success doing so -- feels that others are judging her for not restricting carbs to ketogenic levels (generally defined Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Are Low-carb Diets Effective For Weight Loss?

Are Low-carb Diets Effective For Weight Loss?

Do you want to lose weight, build muscle, or feel more fit? Join Beachbody On Demand, and get unlimited access to Beachbody’s world-famous programs, including 21 Day FIX®, CORE DE FORCE®, and P90X®. Don’t miss out on your chance for amazing results. Sign up today! You’ve probably heard about the benefits of a low-carb diet. Namely, that you’ll experience rapid weight loss by ditching the bread basket and doubling down on a cut of steak. But a low-carb diet isn’t that straightforward in actual practice. Though the principle behind it sounds simple enough — less pasta! more protein! — the diet can be easy to misinterpret. Thanks in part to the perpetuation of popular low-carb diets like the Atkins Diet, which recommended replacing carbs with virtually any high-fat, high-protein foods when it came onto the scene in the early ’70s (it’s now a phased approach that includes gradual increases in carbs), many people end up taking low-carb diets to extreme measures. People nixed hash browns and toast, and piled their plates with bacon, eggs, and sausages with impunity. Some people lost weight, and often quickly, following this model. But, why exactly can people lose weight following a low-carb diet? What Is a Low-Carb Diet, and How Do You Lose Weight on It? According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, carbohydrates should make up 45 to 65 percent of a person’s total daily calorie intake. Any amount less than this could be considered low carb. For someone consuming 2,000 calories a day, this is about 225 to 325 grams of carbohydrates per day. Most low-carb diets limit carbohydrate intake to between 50 to 150 grams per day, depending on the diet, so there’s some variation. If you want to follow a low-carb diet in a way that optimizes overal Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

An Overview Of The Ketogenic Diet

An Overview Of The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet has been in use in medical settings for about 100 years. According to medical researchers , the diet was developed in the 1920s to mimic fasting diets that were used as early as 500 B.C to treat epilepsy and other seizure disorders. While it was used successfully to treat the disease for many years, interest in the diet diminished in the 1990s when anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) were introduced. However, the diet became popular again as certain forms of drug-resistant epilepsy and other pediatric epilepsy syndromes were identified. The ketogenic diet was used successfully in many of these patients. In recent years, the keto diet's role in medicine has been expanded and program is also sometimes used to treat other conditions including headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), cancer, stroke, mitochondrial disorders, brain trauma, psychiatric disorders, autism, and migraines. Researchers are conducting studies to learn why the diet has a positive effect on some of these conditions. But many published reports suggest the ketogenic diet helps to normalize atypical metabolisms which may cause the disorders. The diet has also become popular in some athletic and weight loss communities. People learned that medical patients who are put on the diet often lose weightwhich led to the diet's popularity as a quick method to slim down. Some celebrities and professional athletes have promoted the diet as their preferred eating plan for weight loss, weight maintenance, and improved athletic performance. The resulting media coverage has boosted the keto diet's popularity even further. A ketogenic diet is one in which carbohydrate intake is severely restricted. However, not all low-carbohydrate diets are ketogenic. Continue reading >>

10 Myths Within The Low-carb Community

10 Myths Within The Low-carb Community

Low-carb diets are awesome. The research is clear that they can reverse many common, serious diseases. This includes obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and a few others. Collectively, these are the biggest health problems in the world. That being said, I've noticed a problem that has been growing steadily over the past few years in the low-carb community. A lot of dogma seems to be getting accepted and many myths that are NOT supported by science have gained foothold. This is a consequence of a phenomenon called group thinking, which is common in nutrition circles and can lead to a distorted view of the science. This is a big problem, because dogmatic and extremist views will not help the low-carb diet gain acceptance. They will simply scare intelligent people away and put them in a defensive mode instead of making them willing to observe the arguments objectively. Plus... dogmatic, unscientific views are what got us into this terrible public health mess in the first place. Let's not make that same mistake again. Low-carb diets are super healthy. The studies consistently show that they cause more weight loss and improve most risk factors for disease more than the failed low-fat diet that is still being pushed by nutrition organizations all over the world (1, 2, 3). That being said, low-carb is not appropriate for everyone. We're all different and what works for one person may not work for the next. I know many people who have given low-carb an honest shot and didn't like it, either because they didn't get the results they expected or they simply didn't feel good. For others, low-carb can be downright detrimental. This includes people who are physically active, especially athletes who do a lot of anaerobic work. These individuals need a lot more carbs than peop Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Necessary For Weight Loss?

Is Ketosis Necessary For Weight Loss?

Ketosis involves a high level of chemicals called ketones in the body. Ketone levels become elevated when glycogen stores in the liver have run out and the body needs to burn stored fat for energy. Ketosis can be caused by a diet low in carbs and high in protein. Some people believe that very high-protein diets are the best way to lose weight. The reality is that these diets only enhance the initial water loss that is commonly seen at the beginning of a weight-loss program. Over time, very high-protein diets do not lead to a superior weight loss. Also, the large amount of protein consumed on this type of diet places excessive stress on the kidneys. Very high-protein diets can also make you feel tired, light-headed, and irritable. Weight Watchers encourages moderate amounts of lean protein as part of healthful weight loss. Weight Watchers offers a comprehensive approach to weight loss that can help you reach your goals. Ketosis is not a usual state for the body to be in. It is a back up state when the body (the brain in particular) can no longer rely on its main energy source, glucose, sugar's most basic form. It is not necessary or recommended for weight loss. Energy levels will be drastically reduced and your ability to sustain and recover from any activity will be compromised. Weight loss is about burning more calories than you consume in a healthful manner. Incorporation of increased activity with cardiorespiratory exercise and resistance training along with a sensible reduced calorie diet is the way to go! Ketosis is not necessary for weight loss. Promoted by some low/no carb diets, ketosis is actually an indication that energy metabolism is not working as well as it could. Here's a little science...ketosis is characterized by elevated levels of ketene bodies in the Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And The Ketogenic Diet

Weight Loss And The Ketogenic Diet

It’s pretty obvious the well-known advice to “eat less, move more” for losing weight is not working for most people — if any. In fact, at least ⅔ of dieters who lose weight not only gain it back, but often do so with some extra weight. Yikes. So the question is, can there be a real solution to this problem? There just might be, and it’s a little-known process that more and more people are catching on to: ketosis for weight loss. Ketosis on a low-carb, ketogenic diet works because it helps suppress your appetite unlike other ways of eating. Not only that, it can also support increased focus and mental clarity. Imagine no longer obsessing about food or worrying about eating too much because your appetite is just… under control. No more counting calories! No more cravings. No more crazy amounts of exercise. Just satiety and a regulated appetite. Not only that, a ketogenic diet might even be able to help you lose weight faster than other methods — while keeping the weight off. If this idea appeals to you (and come on, how could it not?), you might be ready to try a ketogenic diet for weight loss. But you’re still left with some questions, so let’s cover all of the details you need to know to get started. Before you can use a ketogenic diet for weight loss, it’s a good idea to have an understanding of how it works. Here are some important points about the ketogenic diet: A ketogenic diet is centered around bringing the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis is metabolic process in which the body burns fat for energy instead of its primary fuel, carbohydrates. When you drastically cut down on the amount of carbohydrates or calories you’re eating, and there aren’t enough carbohydrates from food to burn for energy, the body switches to the state of keto Continue reading >>

Can You Burn Fat Without Being In Ketosis?

Can You Burn Fat Without Being In Ketosis?

When you're trying to lose weight, what you really want is to lose fat while preserving your lean muscle mass. Ketosis occurs when the body burns fat at a high rate. Lowering your carbohydrate intake gets you into the fat-burning zone, but you don't necessarily have to be in ketosis to achieve this goal. Video of the Day Ketosis means that your body is burning fat at high enough rates that you have a lot of ketone bodies, waste compounds produced during the burning of fat. These ketone bodies can also be burned for energy by your brain and most of your other body cells. To have ketone levels high enough to be detectable, you need to keep your carbohydrate intake lower than 50 grams per day, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. If you are in ketosis, which can be verified by using urine ketone strips, you can be 100 percent sure that your body is in fat-burning mode. During a study published in 2005 in the "Journal of the American Medical Association," researchers compared different diet plans, finding that people can lose fat without being in ketosis. If your carb intake is too high, your body prioritizes burning these carbs first. You can promote fat burning by decreasing your carbohydrate intake, but you don't necessarily need to go as low as required to be in ketosis. Restrict your carbs slightly to help your body switch into fat-burning mode more easily. You can burn fat even if you're not producing ketones as long as you create a calorie deficit. In other words, if you eat slightly less than your body needs, your body must gain energy from somewhere else, such as the fat in your love handles. To burn more fat, cut down on your portion sizes, especially of carbohydrate-rich foods such as sweets, soft drinks, bread, pasta, rice an Continue reading >>

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