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Is Ketosis Natural

Is Ketosis Safe?

Is Ketosis Safe?

Is ketosis safe? is a common question for those who are new to the diet or haven’t really researched it thoroughly. When this question comes up, most people are drawing on what they’ve heard from the nearest layperson or about the dangers of ketoacidosis, which is much different. So, it’s time to set the record straight and shed some light on this confusion about the safety of ketosis! First, we’ll look at common myths, including the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis, and finally, how to make sure you’re following the ketogenic diet safely and healthfully. Misconceptions about Ketosis There’s a lot of false information out there about ketosis being bad for you, so let’s address it and talk about what’s untrue. Ketosis Health Myths The most common myths about ketosis being unsafe or unhealthy usually come down to misinformation. Here are some of the top health myths about ketosis and why they’re wrong: Myth: The ketogenic diet causes heart disease. We’ve all been told that fat, especially saturated fat and dietary cholesterol, cause hardening of the arteries and heart disease. This is simply not true based on the latest research. Plus, Dr. Anthony says a high-fat, ketogenic diet is the best thing for reducing inflammation long-term, and inflammation has been linked to heart disease and other diseases. Myth: It’s not safe for your kidneys. You’ll often hear about risk to the kidneys with high-protein diets, and sometimes ketogenic diets are still lumped into that category. But the keto diet is NOT high protein; it’s high fat and moderate protein. You’ll be eating a healthy level of protein that doesn’t overload your system and lots of healthy fats. Myth: Your healthy muscles will waste away. Nope, not if you keep fat intake high and Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Ketosis

Everything You Need To Know About Ketosis

Ketosis is a metabolic state in which your body uses fat, rather than sugar, for energy. Your body shifts into ketosis when your blood sugar is low, and the glycogen in your muscles has been depleted. Typically, this happens when you eat a low carb diet or fast from food altogether for a prolonged period. Ketosis is usually heralded as a fast and effective way to lose body fat. Research suggests that ketosis may positively affect health in other ways, as well. How Does Ketosis Work? Normally, your body is powered by sugar from carbohydrates, a macronutrient. However, if you drastically limit your intake of carbs, your body will tap into its sugar reserves, called glycogen. Once those are used up, a process that takes about three days, your liver begins to metabolize fat. This process is known as ketogenesis, and it produces ketones. Ketones are byproducts of fat metabolism that your body can use as an alternative form of energy.[1] One technical side note—some components of your body require a very small amount of sugar, but your body can produce that small amount of sugar by itself in a process called gluconeogenesis.[2] The Ketogenic Diet For your body to shift into ketosis, you must consume almost no carbohydrates. There are a couple of ways to limit your carb intake. One is through various types of fasting; another is by following a ketogenic diet. The ketogenic diet is high in fat (70-80% of your daily calorie intake), low in protein (15-20%), and very low in carbohydrates (5-10% with no more than 20-30 grams of carbs per day).[3] There are different variations of the ketogenic diet, but, in general, it consists of low carb vegetables like leafy greens (not starchy vegetables like potatoes and corn) and healthy sources of fat and protein like nuts, seeds, avocado Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. Want to be a fat-burning machine without having to count calories? Here’s a few ideas on how to get into ketosis faster on a low carb diet. Do you want to look leaner for bikini season? Yoga pants starting to feel a little tighter? One way to burn fat fast is to go on a ketogenic diet. The physiological process of burning stored fat instead of sugar, can be achieved within a short amount of time after following a strict keto diet. It is possible to get there in a day. In fact, some people show you how to get into ketosis, this fat burning state, in 24 hours. Do you need to fast? Becoming keto adapted where the body burns fat rather than sugar isn’t as hard as you might think. And, you don’t have to starve yourself to get there quickly. The great news for those who want to know how to get into ketosis faster is, well … you don’t have to fast. Fasting has been used for thousands of years by virtually every religion and traditional society. There are some people who think that a complete fast (not just intermittent fasting) is a way to get into ketosis faster. But the great thing about following a ketogenic diet is that you can eat until your heart—er, stomach—is content. You just have to eat enough of the right foods. And, of course, eat very little of the wrong foods. Is getting into ketosis safe without a doctor? Before reviewing how to get into ketosis quickly, let’s take a look at a quick background: T Continue reading >>

Do Ketogenic Diets Have A Place In Human Evolution?

Do Ketogenic Diets Have A Place In Human Evolution?

Part 1: How to think about ketogenic diets within human evolutionary history In the past decade ketogenic diets in humans have started to attract the attention of a few forward thinking researchers as well as a small number of online health enthusiasts. In any diet there are three main elements called macronutrients – fat, protein and carbohydrate. On a ketogenic diet most calories come from fat (65-90%), a moderate amount from protein (<10-25%) and a small amount from carbohydrate (0-15%). A ketogenic diet is often mistaken for a high-protein diet. This is not accurate. A ketogenic diet means eating food that produces ketones, a kind of molecule in the blood that provides energy, like glucose does. Producing a high enough level of ketones is called being in ketosis and it is a metabolic state in which the body relies much less on glucose. The who’s who of low-carbohydrate ketogenic research, headed by Accuros et al. in 2008 (1), defined ketogenic diets as containing <10% of calories from carbohydrates. There are two reasons that I prefer to give a range of 0-15%. First, scientists have not fed large populations in a controlled manner to see how much of each macronutrient is needed to shift more than half of them into nutritional ketosis (we lack empirical data on this). This is complicated by that fact that different people get into nutritional ketosis more or less easily because of various factors, like their level of insulin resistance for example. Second, scientists have not yet defined what the nutritional ketosis threshold is exactly, despite their being good approximations. Before exploring the appropriateness of ketogenic diets for humans, I’d like to justify why I approach questions of human health and nutrition the way I do by introducing 2 concepts; evo Continue reading >>

Product Review: Natural Ketosis

Product Review: Natural Ketosis

After years of following a ketogenic, paleo-friendly diet, I have been able to experience some of the great health and weight loss benefits of eating real food low in carbs. Don't get me wrong, there are exceptional people who do well on a high-carb diet but most of us benefit from a low to moderate carbohydrate diet. As I always say, it's not just about the carbs in foods you eat - food quality matters equally. I've never been overweight and have always been very active but I still found it quite difficult to maintain a healthy weight. Long time before I embarked on a paleo-friendly ketogenic diet, I've been experimenting with fad diets including calorie-restricted, vegan and even juice-based diets. Such unhealthy dieting made my body sick and left me with damaged metabolism and under-active thyroid. As I soon discovered, healthy low-carb is likely the only sustainable way of eating while keeping my body healthy and the scales down. I still remember how difficult it was for me when I started eating LCHF, as I didn't know anything about real food. I was often lacking motivation and saw it as a rather time-consuming way of living. If I knew about Natural Ketosis years ago, it would definitely make my life easier. Natural Ketosis, started by Hannah Sutter, is a UK food delivery service that is unlike any other. Their meals are low in carbs and free of artificial additives. Unlike other diet plans, their aim is to kick-start your diet and teach you about real food and long-term weight loss. So, I decided to give their their diet plan a try. Although the full plan usually takes longer and depends on individual preferences and targets, I've only tried it for 14 days just to get an idea of what it offers. Here is what I've discovered... What I like about this diet plan Meals Continue reading >>

My Thoughts On Low Carb And Paleo Episode 3: A New Hope

My Thoughts On Low Carb And Paleo Episode 3: A New Hope

Really clear, concise and informative post! If people still insist on not “getting” it, know that you have been as pedagogical as is humanly possible and that people, at the end of the day, will have to be responsible for their own reactions. Some reflections based on my own “tinkering”: My first foray into paleo was in 2005. I jumped on board to lose a few vanity lbs (I’ve never been in horrible shape) and for overall health. Unlike many paleo adherents, I’m neither a reformed vegan nor someone who’s had a lot of health issues. My introduction to paleo came as a result of being the co-translator for the Swedish version of Loren Cordain’s The Paleo Diet. The whole thing just made sense to me, and coming from a science background I found the whole premise intriguing. However, when I first discovered paleo, it had yet (at least as far as I was aware) to start overlapping with the whole LC philosophy. As a result, I focused entirely on nutrient density and eliminating the bad stuff. So, I ended up eating starchy tubers more or less freely (no potatoes though) and quite a bit of fruit on top of that. I lost 25 lbs over a four-month period with little effort (I was tiny by the end of it). When I actually bothered to add up the calories I was eating it was never over 1600-1800 kcal (I’m 5’7” and naturally muscular). I almost started worrying that I wasn’t eating enough. The things was, though, that I was hardly ever hungry. The increased satiety, weight loss and stable blood sugar came despite not specifically aiming to reduce carbohydrates. However, I think it’s important to note is that even a so-called high carb paleo diet will usually be lower in carbs than the standard Western diet. Just eliminating refined sugars and grains might be enough to c Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

As The Eating Academy approaches its first birthday in about a month, I figured it was as good a time as any to put together some thoughts on a subject I get asked about with great frequency. (For those wondering when I’ll get to Part X of The Straight Dope on Cholesterol, the answer is, “hopefully before the end of the year.”) A few months ago I was planning a post along the lines of “the 10 things you need to know about ketosis,” but I’m now thinking that might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse. So, let’s start with a more fundamental set of questions. In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that you’ll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of “experts” out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know it’s trendy to make blanket statements – ketosis is “unnatural,” for example, or ketosis is “superior” – but such statements mean nothing if you don’t understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, let’s agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, I’ve deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. What is ketosis? Ketosis is Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis And Exogenous Ketones For Performance

Nutritional Ketosis And Exogenous Ketones For Performance

Before we begin on ketosis, please note this is not intended to discuss all of the research around ketosis, as science has proven its therapeutic benefit for the treatment of chronic conditions including epilepsy, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Rather, this article serves as a summary of the key points, benefits and areas of considerations for those with metabolic and/or performance goals. What is ketosis? Ketosis (noun): a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides most of the energy. Essentially, ketosis is a metabolic state in which you’re predominantly burning stored fat for fuel and converting fat into ketones to be used by the cells. The ketone bodies, acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB), are usually formed either when liver glycogen is low, or via metabolism of medium chain trigylcerides (MCTs). Ketone levels are regulated largely by the hormones insulin and glucagon. The exact definition of ketosis refers to blood concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mmol/L, however 1.5-3.0 mmol/L is considered optimal nutritional ketosis and is recommended for maximum metabolic benefits. Please note: these levels do not apply if you are using ketosis for the therapeutic benefits mentioned above. How to get into nutritional ketosis Low carbohydrate, higher fat (LCHF) nutrition. Find out more and learn what you can eat in our LCHF 7-Day Meal Plan here. For most people, carbohydrate intake will need be <50 grams per day. Smart training, utilizing fasted aerobic training, lowering the volume of intensity, and lifting heavy weights. Lifestyle strategies including stress management, adequate recovery, good sleep and moderating your Continue reading >>

Ketosis: A Desirable State

Ketosis: A Desirable State

Ketosis is a natural state for the body, when it is almost completely fueled by fat. This is normal during fasting, or when on a strict LOW-CARB DIET, also called a KETO DIET. The “Keto” in the word ketosis comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “Ketones”, an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if we eat very few carbs (that are broken down into blood sugar) & only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat & are then consumed as fuel in the body, including by the brain. Our brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day, & it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose or ketones. On a ketogenic diet, our entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat, the insulin levels become very low & fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access our fat stores to burn them off. The studies show that ketogenic diets lead to more weight loss. It’s a common misconception that the brain needs carbs but the truth is that the brain happily burns carbs when we eat them. But if we don’t eat too many carbs, the brain is happy to burn ketones instead. As the body can only store carbs for 1 day or 2, the brain would quickly shut down after a couple of days without food. Alternatively it would quickly have to convert our muscle protein into glucose; a very inefficient process, just to keep the brain going. Many people even feel more energized & focused when the brain gets to run on ketones, made from fat & it certainly speeds up fat loss, if we’re trying to lose weight. By giving our body & brain an almost unlimited supply of energy Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss What is Nutritional Ketosis? Ketosis is an eating plan where the body uses ketones to fuel the brain and body instead of glucose like most people use when on the SAD (standard American diet). It can be very helpful for blood sugar and consistent energy because fat is a very stable source of fuel. We all have a few million calories of fat we would gladly burn off, right? It takes a while to get into ketosis and it can be elusive if you are not paying close attention. It can be very safe for a period of time (even forever) but each person has to decide what feels compatible with their own lifestyle. Some experts do not think it is an optimal state for athletes but others experts disagree. I think we all have bio hack ourselves to see what feels right. Of course, I believe that the paleo template is good starting place for optimal health but ketosis can be an add-on or tweak for people who get stuck or feel hopeless. It can be a powerful and effective way to lose weight without hunger and many of my friends have had success with it. Always ask your doctor before beginning any new nutrition or weight loss plan. Here are some ways to make it work for you: 1. Eat Less Protein I have a made a handy dandy chart here for figuring out the right amounts for you. Most average ladies need about 50-100 grams, no more, fyi. You have to self experiment a little to find what is right for you. The idea is that protein can turn to sugar if someone eats more than they need, then the sugar spikes blood glucose encouraging fat storage. 2. Eat More Fat I used to see this all the time in clients, I say add more fat and people add a tsp of evoo to their salad, NO!!! I am talking about seeing fat as a food group not a side item. Avocad Continue reading >>

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