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Is Ketosis Hard On The Kidneys?

Eat 1/2 Teaspoon Of Baking Soda Daily And This Happens To Your Kidneys!

Eat 1/2 Teaspoon Of Baking Soda Daily And This Happens To Your Kidneys!

The kidneys are small, only about the size of a fist, but they perform vital functions that play a role in overall health. Each day, the kidneys filter about 120-150 quarts of blood, to produce 1-2 quarts of urine, filtering waste and extra fluid out of the body. The kidneys prevent the buildup of waste in the body, keep electrolyte levels stable, and make hormones that regulate blood pressure, make blood cells, and maintain strong bones. Many factors can lead to kidney damage, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, a disease called glomerulonephritis, which damages the kidney’s filtering units, infections, kidney stones, and overuse of some over-the-counter pain killers. Repairing the kidneys after damage just may lie in a common household item: baking soda. How Does it Work? The endocrine system produces hormones and enzymes to help digest food into safer chemicals that the body can process. The pancreas is usually the organ that produces the majority of sodium bicarbonate to protect the kidneys during digestion. Sometimes, the kidneys will produce additional amounts, depending on the type of food you eat. If your diet includes added sugar, fried foods, fatty foods and other unhealthy choices, the endocrine system can become stressed. Both the pancreas and the kidneys will suffer a significant reduction in their ability to produce sodium bicarbonate effectively. Without sufficient production of bicarbonate, the acids produced during digestion cannot be effectively neutralized, causing kidney damage. In dialysis or other treatments for kidney damage, sodium bicarbonate is one of the most common agents used. A process known as acid buffering aids in the removal of excess fluids and waste material from the bloodstream. Dialysis helps to add sodium bicarbonate Continue reading >>

Chris Kruger Ketogenic Diets Damage The Liver And Kidneys-is Ketosis Starvation Mode-how Many Carbs

Chris Kruger Ketogenic Diets Damage The Liver And Kidneys-is Ketosis Starvation Mode-how Many Carbs

Get my weekly newsletter and fix your metabolism in the next 7 days for effortless weight loss: kruger10.com/fix-your-metabolism Your body needs Protein, Fats, Vitamins, and minerals, but your body has zero requirement for dietary carbohydrates. We should all stop eating them. You care about your health, start making Real Fasting effortless as part of the beasting, feasting, fasting lifestyle. Are you tired of cheat days, reward meals, and food binges, that derail your hard work and re-trigger a cycle of food addictions. Are you sick of trying eating six small unsatisfying meals per day to lose weight? Are you tired of feeling hungover after every "Carb day?" It's time to take control of your health and celebrate your success with genuine feasts. By using real fasting as part of the Beasting-Feasting-Fasting lifestyle is incredibly beneficial. How can I help you? What questions would you like answered? Please leave them in the comments below and I'll be back with a new episode tomorrow. It's my mission on YouTube to spread the practice of beasting, feasting, and fasting so that everyone can enjoy true health and effortless fitness. Please join me on this journey. You can start right here Please, subscribe to my channel and leave your comment below so we can advance the conversation and our understanding of health, strength, and happiness. Let's change the world, one healthy transformation at a time. Start now and I will be with you every step of the way. It's the fastest way to transform your body and your life. You can do it. You deserve it. Start today and I promise, you'll have an inspiring transformation story to share with the world in 70 days. @ChrisKruegerTSC Best, CK. PS: I also like videos from Charisma on Command. Checkout his video on 3 Jokes that make people Continue reading >>

Can Ketogenic Diet Be The Cause Of Kidney Stones?

Can Ketogenic Diet Be The Cause Of Kidney Stones?

Nowadays, often we either suffer from kidney stone problem or we hear that our familiar persons are suffering from kidney stone. Most of us even believe that the diet habits of low-carb can be the cause of this problem. Before going into the arguments we must know why do we have kidney stones? Reason for kidney stones Generally, kidney stones are the crystal hard mass that get its form in our urinary tract. Obviously, it is tremendously painful, especially when it goes by the thin ureter in the body. Kidney stones are of different types, but the exact cause of kidney stones are still unknown. It is also true some people are prone to get the kidney stones in their body. Thus, we are not sure that ketogenic diet kidney stones are interlinked. What is the ketogenic diet? A low-carb diet is also known as the ketogenic diet. In these diets, we get protein and fat. The ketogenic diet produces ketosis and this is a condition of the body in which it uses the ketones and fat to burn the fat molecules to make the fuel in the body. This is the basic source of energy or fuel. These diets control your appetite and support to burn the fat, as a result you lose your weight. Benefits of ketogenic diet The ketogenic diet means controls of protein, fat, and carbohydrates which you take as you can only consume maximum fifty grams of carbohydrates per day. These diets not only help to reduce your body weight, but it also helps in certain diseases like epilepsy or malignant brain cancer, etc. However, after having too many ketones in the body, your urine changes into acidic and this gives stress to your kidneys which ultimately changes into kidney stones. Thus, ketogenic diet kidney stones are having the link to each other. Some people who intake too much of meat, fish or poultry protein al Continue reading >>

Ketogenic: Contraindications And No-no’s

Ketogenic: Contraindications And No-no’s

Ketogenic – or keto as it is more commonly known – is really a lifestyle: a way of eating, thinking about and experiencing food. The Ketogenic Kitchen shows you how to approach this lifestyle – you can get into it slowly or dive straight in; it’s up to you. The main goal of the ketogenic diet is to teach the body to run on fat instead of glucose, so all carbohydrates are severely restricted and are instead replaced with fats in the form of oils, dairy, oily fish, avocadoes, nuts and seeds. But as with any regime that brings change on this scale, there are important points to note and also some key contraindications. And while many of the contraindications are pretty obscure, it’s essential to know what they are, just in case. The book summarises them, but we look at them in closer detail below. High fat, not high protein Keto is a clinically proven method of weight loss, but it also holds much promise for patients suffering from cancer, diabetes, epilepsy, neurological disorders like Multiple Sclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. But when people hear ‘low-carb’, they immediately think ‘high-protein’, but that’s not the case with keto. Most of what keto-ers eat is fat – in its many (and delicious!) forms. Proteins are kept at a moderate level because – and few people know this – the body will turn excess protein into sugars. Why keto is different Keto is unlike other ‘diets’ in one very important respect. If it is to do its job properly and switch your body to burning fat, you can’t take a ‘break’ or a ‘day off’. It’s not an 80:20 diet; it’s a metabolic therapy. Very simply, your body is either in ketosis (burning fat) or it’s not. There’s no middle ground. And it can pose dangers, especially if it isn’t implemented corr Continue reading >>

The Paleo Diet And Kidney Stones

The Paleo Diet And Kidney Stones

A long time ago…well, it was actually only about 3 years ago, but it certainly feels like a long time ago…when I first began my Nutritional Odyssey, one of the first stops on my quest, was the Ketogenic diet. I read Lyle McDonald’s book “The Ketogenic Diet”, and promptly lost 24lbs of pure body-fat over the next two months. I wasn’t interested in the Ketogenic Diet as it pertains to the form of the diet that some progressive doctors are prescribing to children with Epilepsy, I was more concerned about the weight-loss and body-building applications as they pertained to me. It was obvious to me at the time, that the general consensus was that there is a high risk of Kidney stones while on a Ketogenic diet, and that Potassium supplementation was highly recommended to combat this heightened risk. Why is there a higher risk of Kidney Stones while on a Ketogenic Diet? Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% []. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Continue reading >>

Bring In The Research Supporting The Blood Sugars You Want To Achieve Will Work.

Bring In The Research Supporting The Blood Sugars You Want To Achieve Will Work.

One of the worst things high blood sugars do to your body is that they slowly destroy your kidneys. Unfortunately, as is the case with so many "diabetic" complications, this organ destruction also appears to begin long before many people are given a diabetes diagnosis. The landmark UKPDS study found that one out of eight people diagnosed with diabetes already were leaking small amounts of protein into their urine. This symptom, called "microalbuminuria." is an early sign that kidneys have been damaged. Though there is no total agreement as to why this occurs, some factors that promote kidney damage are: 1. High blood pressure. When blood pressure is high, large protein molecules, including those that are glycosylated (covered with sticky excess sugar molecules) are pushed through the pores of the kidney's filtration units, damaging them. 2. High blood sugar. When normal glucose regulation fails, the kidneys must remove excess glucose from the blood, leading to high concentrations of glucose in the kidneys. These glucose molecules clog up tiny capillaries in the kidneys as they do those elsewhere in the body. Eventually this clogging destroys the glomeruli, the filtration units of the kidney. An eleven year study of over 1800 people with diabetes found a straight line relationship between the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and the A1c. The risk began to increase significantly when the A1c rose over 6.0%. Poor Glycemic Control in Diabetes and the Risk of Incident Chronic Kidney Disease Even in the Absence of Albuminuria and Retinopathy: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Lori D. Bash et al. Arch Intern Med. Vol. 168 No. 22, Dec 8/22, 2008 Another study, that followed people with Type 1 diabetes for more than a decade found that those who had achi Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

The ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketotic, and only for a brief portion of the program. It has not been associated with kidney damage or disease in individuals who have normally functioning kidneys. Concerns regarding undue stress on the kidneys are often aimed at very low carbohydrate, very high protein ketogenic diets. Few studies have shown any actual damage, however. (Note: Although the Weight Loss portion of the ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketogenic, it is not considered to be exceptionally “high protein” for most individuals.) Dietary ketosis is among the most maligned and misunderstood concepts in nutrition medicine. Particularly among researchers who don’t actually treat patients, ketosis (the presence of ketone bodies in the urine) is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening build-up of ketone bodies due to muscle wasting and dehydration as in states of shock or uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Whereas patients in ketoacidosis are closely monitored in Intensive Care Units, individuals in ketosis are amongst the healthy, active population. Dietary ketosis is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis is achieved. Blood glucose levels are stabilized within a normal range and there is no break-down of healthy muscle tissue. It would be diffi Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

How Low-carb Diets May Be Causing More Kidney Stones

How Low-carb Diets May Be Causing More Kidney Stones

Like many busy people, David Crossley often used to find himself so wrapped up in his working day that he would go without lunch, and often barely stopped for a cup of tea. In fact, David, 63, a musculoskeletal therapist from Birmingham, admits: 'I would often be so busy at the clinic that I'd forget to drink any liquid at all, other than the odd cup of tea or coffee. It had been the same way for years - although I would drink more water at weekends.' Last year, this habit caught up with him. He noticed a vague ache in his abdomen, stretching around to his back. 'It wasn't agonising but it just didn't feel quite right, so I went to the GP,' he says. 'As I had some bloating, he sent me for an ultrasound.' This revealed two large stones in his right kidney - a direct result, his doctors believe, of his low fluid intake. A CT scan showed that the stones were so large (6 mm across) they could not be passed naturally, and he needed surgery. One in ten of us will develop a kidney stone, and the numbers are rising dramatically. They are the result of waste products in the blood forming crystals inside the kidneys, which eventually build up into a solid lump. They can be excruciatingly painful - on a level, say experts, with childbirth. The stones often remain symptomless while they're in the kidney. They start causing pain - known as renal colic - once they travel down the ureter, the narrow tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. 'Renal colic is caused by the stone suddenly blocking the ureter,' says Mr Leye Ajayi, consultant urological surgeon at the Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth, London. The pain often comes on suddenly and can cause the patient to 'writhe around in agony', he adds. The pain can be intense enough to cause nausea and vomiting. Once on th Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Is Ketosis Dangerous?

Duck Dodgers October 14, 2014 Peter, An article by Per Wikholm was published in this month’s LCHF Magasinet, where Per demonstrates that the Inuit could not have been in ketosis given that the scientific literature is abundantly clear, over and over again, that the Inuit consumed too much protein, and more importantly, Per debunks Stefansson’s claims for high fat with writing from his own books—Stef admitted in the pemmican recipes that Arctic caribou was too lean to make pemmican that supported ketosis. The most popular LCHF bloggers in Sweden, Andreas Eenfeldt/Diet Doctor and Annika Dahlquist have reluctantly agreed with Per’s findings—admitting that the Inuit were likely not ketogenic from their diet. I’ve put together a comprehensive review of the scientific literature regarding the Inuit, encompassing over two dozen studies, spanning 150 years, with references from explorers, including Stefansson. In the comments section of that post, Per gives a brief overview of how he was able to prove Stefansson’s observations on high fat intake were flawed. The post is a review of all the available literature that I could find (over two dozen studies). But, the literature certainly does not in any way support ketosis from the Inuit diet due to such high protein consumption. As Per (and Stefansson) points out, the caribou is too lean and as the many quotes show, the Inuit were saving their blubber and fat for the long dark Winter to power their oil lamps and heat their igloos. Again and again, we see that in the literature, as even Stefansson admits this. As far as glycogen is concerned, their glycogen intake is probably not worth scrutinizing given the well-documented high protein consumption in every published study. It really is besides the point. But, interest Continue reading >>

Could A High-fat, Low-carb Diet Someday Replace Dialysis?

Could A High-fat, Low-carb Diet Someday Replace Dialysis?

MORE A type of low-carb, high-fat diet that's typically used to manage seizures for children with epilepsy could reverse kidney disease in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics, a new animal study suggests. If successful in humans, the so-called ketogenic diet could have the potential to replace dialysis, which is a procedure that artificially filters blood in place of a damaged or failed kidney, said study researcher Charles Mobbs, professor of neuroscience and geriatrics and palliative care medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. "I speculate that this may be useful to completely cure diabetic kidney failure , and I hope that it's possible," Mobbs told MyHealthNewsDaily. "If it's possible, we can potentially not require dialysis. That's a big deal." However, a lot more research in mice is needed before any studies can be done in humans, Mobbs said, let alone determine if the diet can reverse advanced kidney disease in humans, he said. "That's the first thing we want to establish in mice: Can we truly reset the clock? Can we completely correct the [kidney] impairments?" Mobbs said. Other experts say the finding is promising for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics with earlier-stage kidney disease, but more research must be done to provide evidence that the diet can make an impact on end-stage kidney disease , or kidney failure. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin (needed to move blood sugar into cells for energy) to control blood sugar levels, according to the National Institutes of Health. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels. Overweight and obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, according to the N Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Researchers have found that by administering a low-carb, high-fat diet in mice, that diabetic kidney damage was reversed, and also uncovered an array of genes associated with kidney failure. Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have for the first time determined that the ketogenic diet, a specialized high-fat, low carbohydrate diet, may reverse impaired kidney function in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They also identified a previously unreported panel of genes associated with diabetes-related kidney damage, whose changes in expression were reversed by the diet. The findings were published online in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE. Charles Mobbs, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience and Geriatrics and Palliative Care Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and his research team evaluated mice that were genetically predisposed to have Type 1 or 2 diabetes. The mice were allowed to develop diabetic nephropathy, or kidney damage. Half of the mice were put on the ketogenic diet, while the control group maintained a standard high carbohydrate diet. The researchers found that after eight weeks, molecular and functional indicators of kidney damage were reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet. Microscopic analysis showed that kidney pathology in the model of Type 2 diabetes was partially reversed. "Our study is the first to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes," said Dr. Mobbs. "This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year." The ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high-fat diet typically used to control seizures in children with epilepsy. Many cells can get their e Continue reading >>

Cons Of High-protein Diets

Cons Of High-protein Diets

So your buddy tells you he’s starving and has a case of hunger breath. After your workout, you guys head to lunch. He orders a cheeseburger deluxe platter, no bun, extra cheese, no fries. He explains the carbs are totally bad for him and that he's on a high-protein diet. Whether it's the Atkins Diet, Zone Diet, The South Beach Diet, Meat-Mania, Proteinopia or whatever fancy name they call that high-protein diet he's on, it's doing more harm than good. The calling card of high-protein diets is that your body burns fat for energy and that, in turn, will result in weight loss. Prolonged consumption of high protein sends the body into a state of ketosis. That’s top of the list of cons of high-protein diets. Ketosis occurs when the liver converts fats into fatty acids for use as energy and the by-product, ketones. Ketones increase the acidity of the blood and can be detected in the urine. In extreme cases of starvation or fasting, the body undergoes gluconeogenesis, which is the production of glucose from sources other than carbohydrates, primarily protein. Possible kidney damage High-protein diets place a lot of stress on the kidneys. The initial weight loss on high-protein diets is from water loss. When carb intake is restricted, the body uses muscle and liver glycogen for energy. For each gram of glycogen, two grams of water are used or “lost.” The minute you give into your carb craving, that weight will come back. The diuretic effect of eliminating carbohydrates from your diet stresses the kidneys while they remove urea, a by-product of protein synthesis, from the body. Compounding that problem, when the body is in a state of ketosis, increased levels of calcium are excreted — that can lead to kidney stones; a build-up of calcium in the urine. Think about the e Continue reading >>

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